akmd
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I'm currently reaching the end of a Foundation Degree in Graphic Communications. However, I think there's a good chance I'm not even going to pass it. Recently, I have developed an interest in Economics and noticed LSE does offer degrees via distance learning. The degree I end up with is exactly the same standard as the one obtained by internal students.

I feel my current course is not what I should be doing as I'm not good enough to make work of an acceptable quality. My written/academic skills are far stronger and my tutors have even told me this. Economics is something I'm very interested and I feel I could do very well if given the opportunity to study it.

I live in London so I'm perfectly capable of visiting the university and use their library. Since I won't have face-to-face tuition and other factors , the course fee is lower too. I'm not quite sure I meet all the entrance requirements but it is mentioned on their site that they will consider ALL applicants and will notify if I need other qualifications before joining the course.

I'm seriously thinking of applying. Do you think I stand a chance? Here's the relevant web page: http://www.londonexternal.ac.uk/pros...cs/index.shtml I would appreciate any comments.
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Knogle
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It's dirt easy to be admitted into practically any one of the LSE's external programmes. Whilst the administration insists that graduates of the programme are held in the same regard as internal students, industry professionals certainly don't believe likewise -- and that's what really matters. The EP is a cash cow for the LSE, which runs it simply to fund scholarships, subsidise home students, compensate professors, and so on. I'm probably going to take some flak for this, but my opinion is based on informed research and exchanges with existing students both on the internal and external programmes, university staff, and employers.

If you're in London, why don't you apply as a student of the internal 3-year programme? As a home student, you also pay remarkably low fees.
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akmd
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I would have applied as an internal student but that would involve going through UCAS for 2008 entry (unless I could get a place through clearing this year) and I don't meet the entry requirements although they may still consider me anyway. You say the external degree is not looked on as well as those obtained internally but surely getting an excellent class degree externally would put me in a better situation than my current one? Thank you for your input.
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Knogle
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(Original post by akmd)
I would have applied as an internal student but that would involve going through UCAS for 2008 entry (unless I could get a place through clearing this year) and I don't meet the entry requirements although they may still consider me anyway. You say the external degree is not looked on as well as those obtained internally but surely getting an excellent class degree externally would put me in a better situation than my current one? Thank you for your input.
It's a grey area TBH - something which I can't comfortably and authoritatively comment on. You're right that you'll only be able to apply for '08 entry, but IMO if you could occupy the next 16months or so with meaningful work experience or personal projects, that would comfortably make up for the deferred placement. You certainly won't find L101 in Clearing, so don't pin your hopes on that.
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akmd
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Thank you for the quick reply. Perhaps I should see what the outcome of my current course is and then, if this is not favourable, consider appkying for this external programme and see what happens from there.
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2late
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In order to satisfy the entrance requirements for the BSc Economics, applicants must be at least 17 years of age at the time of registration and must demonstrate that you have reached a level of competence in Mathematics at least equivalent to a pass at GCSE/GCE 'O' Level, at not less than grade C, in a mathematical subject. Applicants should also hold passes in either:
two subjects at GCE 'A' Level + at least three further subjects at GCSE or GCE 'O' Level (at not less than grade C or a 'pass' if taken prior to 1975)

or three subjects at GCE 'A' Level + one further subject at GCSE or GCE 'O' Level (at not less than grade C)

or two subjects at GCE 'A' Level + two further subjects at 'AS' Level.
Compare that and the traditional AAA at A level coupled with 6+ A* at GCSE for an internal student. Clearly there is a difference in expectations, by which there is clearly difference in programme difficulty, which is clearly seen by employers. :P
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akmd
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(Original post by 2late)
Compare that and the traditional AAA at A level coupled with 6+ A* at GCSE for an internal student. Clearly there is a difference in expectations, by which there is clearly difference in programme difficulty, which is clearly seen by employers. :P
That may be so but I still feel it is worth looking into. I'm currently at Kingston University on a Graphics course as I mentioned in my original post. I feel that studying this degree would give you more options in regards to employment. If I get a First class external degree from LSE, surely it would be more beneficial to me than a degree from Kingston?
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Phoenix Wright
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Well, what another poster here has done is he got a Bachelors from LSE's external degree program, but then was accepted into an MSc program at LSE as well which he'll be doing at the LSE, so that might be a way to go to, eh?
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akmd
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(Original post by Phoenix Wright)
Well, what another poster here has done is he got a Bachelors from LSE's external degree program, but then was accepted into an MSc program at LSE as well which he'll be doing at the LSE, so that might be a way to go to, eh?
I think you might be right, Pheonix (Excuse the pun! )

I'll just have to wait and see. One thing that concerns me a bit is my age. I will be 21 in July. If I start this external programme this year, I'll graduate when I'm 24. If I decide to MSc, I'll be 25. Would that mean I would be no longer eligible for a junior position or would that not matter?
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Phoenix Wright
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I think junior position refers to your qualifications, not your age. But don't quote me since I'm not up-to-date on UK terminology.
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shady lane
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I think an Open University degree would be better, it is more respected than the London External program. Or try Birkbeck--all their courses are part-time.
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akmd
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I looked at Birkbeck but their degrees seem to last four years as opposed to three. I realise it's part-time but are none of their academic programmes available on a full-time basis? And is an OU degree really better than an external LSE one? If so, why?
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2late
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I'd agree with Phoenix with regard to the MSc @ LSE after the external programme.
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akmd
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(Original post by 2late)
I'd agree with Phoenix with regard to the MSc @ LSE after the external programme.
A Masters would be nice. But perhaps it would be a better idea to find work after gaining my Bachelors degree instead. I could always do a Masters at a later date.
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shady lane
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(Original post by akmd)
I looked at Birkbeck but their degrees seem to last four years as opposed to three. I realise it's part-time but are none of their academic programmes available on a full-time basis? And is an OU degree really better than an external LSE one? If so, why?
Birkbeck only does part-time courses, it was established as a college that would be open to people who need to work while studying.
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bryan
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(Original post by shady lane)
I think an Open University degree would be better, it is more respected than the London External program. Or try Birkbeck--all their courses are part-time.
I think Birkeck and LSE External are more respected than Open University.
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akmd
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(Original post by shady lane)
Birkbeck only does part-time courses, it was established as a college that would be open to people who need to work while studying.
That may be a good choice then. I can try to find work and study at the same time. But I am still keen on this External programme with LSE. I went to see where the campus was yesterday as I was in the area and it looked fantastic. It's only 6 minutes away from Holborn tube and it is possible for me to get there in less than half an hour from where I live. I may be studying externally but I would use their library on a regular basis.

Any other comments and suggestions?
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akmd
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After much consideration, I'm going to apply for Business at LSE as an External Degree student. Might as well see what happens. Thank you for all your help.
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Ch3
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hey if it helps... i know that LSE does accept students on their external degree program to transfer into their second year at LSE (and complete their degree at LSE Internally in the process) but from what I've heard, you'll have to do phenomenally well for that to even be possible.
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akmd
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(Original post by Ch3)
hey if it helps... i know that LSE does accept students on their external degree program to transfer into their second year at LSE (and complete their degree at LSE Internally in the process) but from what I've heard, you'll have to do phenomenally well for that to even be possible.
Yes, I've heard about that. I'm prepared to work my butt off to achieve that!
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