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    Hi everyone,
    I need some advice over choosing whether to do AS level philosophy & ethics or to do AS level physics.

    My dream plan for the future would be to do a degree in computer science and to do a computer-related job.

    I have been applying to other colleges/sixth forms, but the one I'm most likely to go to (which is the sixth form at my school) has given me the offer of:

    - Psychology
    - Computer Science
    - Mathematics
    - Physics

    I originally put down as my top 5: computer science, maths, physics, philosophy and philosophy in that order but due to timetabling issues (physics clashing with philosophy) this is the offer I ended up having.

    However, I am having some second thoughts and I am wondering whether swapping physics with philosophy would be the best for me.

    I know that physics would be a good combination for these subjects and it can get me into some careers that I am interested in and it would definitely be of help for the rest of the careers I would like to do. However, I will admit that I do struggle a bit with maths and science (C-B grades) but I am working very hard to improve that. I am just worried that it will be just too taxing for me and that I will end up with a poor grade.

    P&E is defiantly something I have an interest in and I do enjoy it. It does also have the advantage of offering an essay-based subject, which could open up a wider skill set. A lot of people do say however that it wouldn't be useful for doing jobs in computer science. I am also worried about it being seen as a soft subject. It would also inevitably close off a few jobs I am interested in because some need a physics A-level

    I can give more information if need be.
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    Personally I think you should pick physics but I would tell anyone that I do think that it would be best for what you want to do later on. Maybe have a look at the uni courses that you might want to do and look at the A level requirements (if you want to go to uni that is!)

    I think it is also important to consider how much you like physics as well? You don't want to do something that you don't like just because it is useful

    Do you know anyone who does computer science related job who you can talk to?
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    Philosophy and ethics!
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    if possible Take them all ?, leave psychology for further maths.
    Something like this: Maths,Physics,Further maths,Computer Science (+ Psychology) and you should be fine
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    (Original post by Jor64)
    Hi everyone,
    I need some advice over choosing whether to do AS level philosophy & ethics or to do AS level physics.

    My dream plan for the future would be to do a degree in computer science and to do a computer-related job.

    I have been applying to other colleges/sixth forms, but the one I'm most likely to go to (which is the sixth form at my school) has given me the offer of:

    - Psychology
    - Computer Science
    - Mathematics
    - Physics

    I originally put down as my top 5: computer science, maths, physics, philosophy and philosophy in that order but due to timetabling issues (physics clashing with philosophy) this is the offer I ended up having.

    However, I am having some second thoughts and I am wondering whether swapping physics with philosophy would be the best for me.

    I know that physics would be a good combination for these subjects and it can get me into some careers that I am interested in and it would definitely be of help for the rest of the careers I would like to do. However, I will admit that I do struggle a bit with maths and science (C-B grades) but I am working very hard to improve that. I am just worried that it will be just too taxing for me and that I will end up with a poor grade.

    P&E is defiantly something I have an interest in and I do enjoy it. It does also have the advantage of offering an essay-based subject, which could open up a wider skill set. A lot of people do say however that it wouldn't be useful for doing jobs in computer science. I am also worried about it being seen as a soft subject. It would also inevitably close off a few jobs I am interested in because some need a physics A-level

    I can give more information if need be.
    Personally, If I were you I'd pick Physics because having a level physics can managerial roles in jobs and overall it's a great and well respected subject to chose
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    Philosophy at a-level isn't going to be so handy for computing related jobs. If you do it at a decent university at degree level though it will be highly relevant - the logic side mostly of course, but philosophy of language and lots of analytic philosophy too.

    I would normally suggest physics for your a-level as it is admittedly a super impressive a-level and a lot of what you do in a-level PnE you do at degree more in depth anyway so you can just do it there - even if you have to do it as an elective module while doing your computer science degree. Philosophy isn't seen as a soft a-level though, psychology is :P Philosophy is up there just below the geography/maths/physics tier. Probably on the same level as economics I'd say.

    I feel like with computer science if you have a portfolio that showcases your skill and knowledge most places will overlook their arbitrary requirements for things like a physics a-level, that's just a filter. And sometimes they won't as it will be contractually in place and a legal thing, but sometimes they will and it shows real ambition on your behalf to be digging into this job position when you don't have the 'requirements' yet you're adamant you're better suited for it than most people.
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    theres a lot of overlap between computer science and philosophy; unfortunately not much at a level
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    (Original post by zXcodeXz)
    Personally, If I were you I'd pick Physics because having a level physics can managerial roles in jobs and overall it's a great and well respected subject to chose
    I'm pretty sure philosophy is far more useful for managerial roles than physics lol. Both are quite strong a-levels.

    Let's be real though, if you are going onto degree level study OP then your a-level choices won't matter much after you've graduated. Only your degree modules, grade and exerpeience will. Making sure you get good grades at a-levels now will be more important than having the "hardest set of a-levels". So maybe philosophy would be better for you?

    People might worry about your lack of mathematical ability if you lack physics and want to do degree level philosophy or computer science but the mathematics of those two subjects is extremely different from the rote-learning sort of calculus related stuff you do in any a-level subject, so you'll be fine. Or at least, you're as likely to be fine as the guy who gets an A* in a-level maths and an A* in level physics if you get an A* in philosophy and computer science :P
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    (Original post by TorpidPhil)
    I'm pretty sure philosophy is far more useful for managerial roles than physics lol. Both are quite strong a-levels.

    Let's be real though, if you are going onto degree level study OP then your a-level choices won't matter much after you've graduated. Only your degree modules, grade and exerpeience will. Making sure you get good grades at a-levels now will be more important than having the "hardest set of a-levels". So maybe philosophy would be better for you?

    People might worry about your lack of mathematical ability if you lack physics and want to do degree level philosophy or computer science but the mathematics of those two subjects is extremely different from the rote-learning sort of calculus related stuff you do in any a-level subject, so you'll be fine. Or at least, you're as likely to be fine as the guy who gets an A* in a-level maths and an A* in level physics if you get an A* in philosophy and computer science :P
    That's true didn't really consider that!
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    if you excel at philosophy and read around the subject (the analytic stuff, not the namby pamby french stuff that cant get you tenure in any sophisticated country) the a level will frustrate you no end due to a lack of emphasis on reasoning compared to knowledge and understanding.

    on the other hand it can open up areas of interest which might direct you to self study subjects relevant to computer science; logic and perhaps ai, which you might be able to put on your personal statement.
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    The problem is that everyone's timetable is split into "blocks" - A, B, C and D
    The only subjects I can do in block A are: Chemistry, Psychology and BTEC in IT.

    I have a very limited choice for that block.

    Block B is the only block that has maths in it
    Block D is the only block with computer studies

    So that leaved block C, which basically had the choice of either P&E or Physics.

    Thinking about it, I COULD do: IT BTEC, Maths, Physics and Philosophy. That's something one teacher recommended me to think about.
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    Choose a REAL A-level: Physics FTW!
 
 
 
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