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    I often hear about how any degree is acceptable for FO roles and consulting so long as it's traditional or respectable. How do recruiters view undergraduate business management degrees as I've heard that in the UK they're only only valued at the postgraduate level (MiM/MBA) and that undergrad bus schools students tend to be those who are less academically gifted.would I be better off studying maths/econ or management at a strong target (durham/notts/bath) or management/information management for business at somewhere like Warwick/UCL when it comes to getting a job?
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    (Original post by Mean Joe)
    I often hear about how any degree is acceptable for FO roles and consulting so long as it's traditional or respectable. How do recruiters view undergraduate business management degrees as I've heard that in the UK they're only only valued at the postgraduate level (MiM/MBA) and that undergrad bus schools students tend to be those who are less academically gifted.would I be better off studying maths/econ or management at a strong target (durham/notts/bath) or management/information management for business at somewhere like Warwick/UCL when it comes to getting a job?
    Stated many times, degree choice does not matter, obviously to a certain extent. Doubt you can do something like Woman Studies, hypothetically speaking. Business studies is a perfectly suitable degree, especially from the likes of Warwick Business School and will beat a Economics degree from Notts for example. To take your point about UCL's IMB programme, a Econ grad from UCL will not be any better than an IMB grad, assuming both have no EC's/work experience. The university simply ticks one box, the question is, can you tick the others? That's what seperates applicants, not the course, as you perceive it to be.
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    (Original post by Mean Joe)
    I often hear about how any degree is acceptable for FO roles and consulting so long as it's traditional or respectable. How do recruiters view undergraduate business management degrees as I've heard that in the UK they're only only valued at the postgraduate level (MiM/MBA) and that undergrad bus schools students tend to be those who are less academically gifted.would I be better off studying maths/econ or management at a strong target (durham/notts/bath) or management/information management for business at somewhere like Warwick/UCL when it comes to getting a job?
    Degree means virtually squat for most graduate roles. This is a generalisation however, I doubt a Business Management grad would have the sufficient mathematics training to get a gig doing exotic derivatives trading for example - obviously, this is only a small proportion of the grad roles out there. What's important is the brand name of your uni (Warwick/UCL being targets, Durham/Bristol/Notts et al being less targeted or 'semi-targets'), extra curriculars, work experience, general intelligence and personality fit. So if we're maximising for this list, the better brand wins most times.

    That all said, I personally don't really 'endorse' the IMB degree at UCL. If you are genuinely capable I'd urge you to consider their Management Science degree or an econ/finance degree at a semi-target. There comes a time where a trade off in course interest and content must be made, of which I feel a stronger degree from a semi-target would be a better skill building and learning experience.

    Management at Warwick is solid because of WBS' notoriety and prominence amongst employers. It's by no means a 'weak' degree.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Degree means virtually squat for most graduate roles. This is a generalisation however, I doubt a Business Management grad would have the sufficient mathematics training to get a gig doing exotic derivatives trading for example - obviously, this is only a small proportion of the grad roles out there. What's important is the brand name of your uni (Warwick/UCL being targets, Durham/Bristol/Notts et al being less targeted or 'semi-targets', extra curriculars, work experience, general intelligence and personality fit. So if we're maximising for this list, the better brand wins most times.

    That all said, I personally don't really 'endorse' the IMB degree at UCL. If you are genuinely capable I'd urge you to consider their Management Science degree or an econ/finance degree at a semi-target. There comes a time where a trade off in course interest and content must be made, of which I feel a stronger degree from a semi-target would be a better skill building and learning experience.

    Management at Warwick is solid because of WBS' notoriety and prominence amongst employers. It's by no means a 'weak' degree.

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    So for IMB you think it would be better (more fulfilling) to do Econ at somewhere like Durham/Nottingham/Bristol but in the case of Warwick it would be better to do Management? Secondly would applying to do a year abroad make any kind of significant difference in my employability, or do you think a work placement would be better?
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    (Original post by glebp)
    Stated many times, degree choice does not matter, obviously to a certain extent. Doubt you can do something like Woman Studies, hypothetically speaking. Business studies is a perfectly suitable degree, especially from the likes of Warwick Business School and will beat a Economics degree from Notts for example. To take your point about UCL's IMB programme, a Econ grad from UCL will not be any better than an IMB grad, assuming both have no EC's/work experience. The university simply ticks one box, the question is, can you tick the others? That's what seperates applicants, not the course, as you perceive it to be.
    Thank's for the info, it's just that I'd read that several employers lament the lack of critical thinking and underdeveloped quantitative skill-set often put forward by Business degree holders (lack the critical thinking and analytical skills of a humanities/arts, lack the quant skills of Econ/CS/Maths) and that was why most elite universities didn't offer it at undergraduate level (particularly in US).
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    It also seems that at several Business Schools, Management degrees for whatever reason don't seem to satisfy the postgraduate entry requirements due to a lack of quantitative content, do you know if the management course at Warwick is sufficiently quanty to do a Masters in Finance for example (LSE and Bristol's Management courses seem to fit the bill but LSE is ultra competitive to get into).
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    (Original post by Mean Joe)
    Thank's for the info, it's just that I'd read that several employers lament the lack of critical thinking and underdeveloped quantitative skill-set often put forward by Business degree holders (lack the critical thinking and analytical skills of a humanities/arts, lack the quant skills of Econ/CS/Maths) and that was why most elite universities didn't offer it at undergraduate level (particularly in US).
    Where did you read this?
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    (Original post by Mean Joe)
    It also seems that at several Business Schools, Management degrees for whatever reason don't seem to satisfy the postgraduate entry requirements due to a lack of quantitative content, do you know if the management course at Warwick is sufficiently quanty to do a Masters in Finance for example (LSE and Bristol's Management courses seem to fit the bill but LSE is ultra competitive to get into).
    The Masters in Finance at LSE only requires A Level Mathematics or equivalent.
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    (Original post by banterboy)
    Where did you read this?
    http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB100014...23754019227394


    (Original post by glebp)
    The Masters in Finance at LSE only requires A Level Mathematics or equivalent.
    LSE do, MBS specify more quanty undergrad degrees same goes for Imperial and Oxford, Cambridge in general seem to prefer students who haven't studied business at undergrad (to make the class a bit more diverse). Warwick state that "You must have achieved a good standard in mathematics, economics, and statistics/econometrics at undergraduate level". To be honest I'm probably overthinking things but choosing university feels like such a huge decision, thanks for putting up with my ignorance, I've done research online but there's just so much conflicting information.
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    There were also cbs and linkedin articles to the same effect.
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    (Original post by Mean Joe)
    So for IMB you think it would be better (more fulfilling) to do Econ at somewhere like Durham/Nottingham/Bristol but in the case of Warwick it would be better to do Management? Secondly would applying to do a year abroad make any kind of significant difference in my employability, or do you think a work placement would be better?
    Exactly this, yes. The others are still somewhat targeted and people every year do go into banking, so may as well do a more interesting degree at the likes of Durham/Notts/Bristol whilst still having plenty of chances (assuming your CV is good enough) to land interviews. Although, Management at Warwick ticks both the interesting course box + target - which you've acknowledged.

    I'd go for the year abroad. It's a once in a lifetime chance to discover a new culture, make friends, and a significant push out of your comfort zone. Banks etc all recruit via summer internships anyway, the value add of doing a year long placement doesn't outweigh the experiential learning from the year abroad.
 
 
 
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