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    can anyone explain the process to me i've tried so hard to learn it but i still dont't seem to get it. can you also explain about what the ions do? like which charge goes where?
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    Do you mean C1? Or C3? Because C3 is slightly more complex than C1 electrolysis.

    But in C1 electrolysis uses ionic and regular compounds such as Aluminium Oxide and HCl, so for example:

    HCl is used as the electrolyte which is what you're trying to break down. The electrolysis of HCl forms H+ (cat) ions and Cl- (an) ions, this is because Hydrogen has 1 outer electron so it wants to loose it and Cl has 7 outer electrons. Meaning Hydrogen looses an electron becoming H+ and Chlorine gains an electron becoming Cl-

    So in the electrolyte you then have H+ cations and Cl- anions the H+ ions will move to the negative electrode (cathode) where it gains electrons due to reduction and because Hydrogen travels round in pairs its usually H2 meaning you need to gain 2 electrons (H2 -> 2H+ + 2e-) which means its released as a Hydrogen gas!

    Then you have Cl- which is an Anion and it will go to the Anode, this is where oxidation takes place meaning it looses electrons, Cl2 usually travels round in pairs again! so 2 chlorine atoms will need to loose to electrons (2Cl- -> Cl2 + 2e-) and this means Chlorine is released as a gas!

    So the D.C electric current basically takes electrons from the Cathode and supplies them to the Anode (hence positive and negative)


    I hope this helped you!
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    (Original post by chrlhyms)
    Do you mean C1? Or C3? Because C3 is slightly more complex than C1 electrolysis.

    But in C1 electrolysis uses ionic and regular compounds such as Aluminium Oxide and HCl, so for example:

    HCl is used as the electrolyte which is what you're trying to break down. The electrolysis of HCl forms H+ (cat) ions and Cl- (an) ions, this is because Hydrogen has 1 outer electron so it wants to loose it and Cl has 7 outer electrons. Meaning Hydrogen looses an electron becoming H+ and Chlorine gains an electron becoming Cl-

    So in the electrolyte you then have H+ cations and Cl- anions the H+ ions will move to the negative electrode (cathode) where it gains electrons due to reduction and because Hydrogen travels round in pairs its usually H2 meaning you need to gain 2 electrons (H2 -> 2H+ + 2e-) which means its released as a Hydrogen gas!

    Then you have Cl- which is an Anion and it will go to the Anode, this is where oxidation takes place meaning it looses electrons, Cl2 usually travels round in pairs again! so 2 chlorine atoms will need to loose to electrons (2Cl- -> Cl2 + 2e-) and this means Chlorine is released as a gas!

    So the D.C electric current basically takes electrons from the Cathode and supplies them to the Anode (hence positive and negative)


    I hope this helped you!
    Thank youu this has helped alot.
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    (Original post by mk_cbc)
    Thank youu this has helped alot.

    You're welcome! If you do triple and need help with anything else just send me a message! (or just science in general!)
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    (Original post by chrlhyms)
    You're welcome! If you do triple and need help with anything else just send me a message! (or just science in general!)
    ah yeah i do triple, i actually need help for physics. do you know any sites that explain the content well. im aware of mygcsescience but that costs money, i guess it would be useful but i just want to know if there is any alternatives? Also how do you revise for science im trying to pick up ideas that might be useful to me.
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    (Original post by mk_cbc)
    ah yeah i do triple, i actually need help for physics. do you know any sites that explain the content well. im aware of mygcsescience but that costs money, i guess it would be useful but i just want to know if there is any alternatives? Also how do you revise for science im trying to pick up ideas that might be useful to me.
    I simply use the CGP revision guides! are you with Edexcel? What I do is I just memorise the content and then do past papers to consolidate my knowledge really! CGP for me is the best bet really 'Fuse school' is quite good for chemistry!

    But please don't hesitate to ask if you need help with Physics as I'm very happy to help! It helps my revision too-Edexcel P3 is very intellectually challenging so I can see where you're coming from if you do edexcel!
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    (Original post by chrlhyms)
    I simply use the CGP revision guides! are you with Edexcel? What I do is I just memorise the content and then do past papers to consolidate my knowledge really! CGP for me is the best bet really 'Fuse school' is quite good for chemistry!

    But please don't hesitate to ask if you need help with Physics as I'm very happy to help! It helps my revision too-Edexcel P3 is very intellectually challenging so I can see where you're coming from if you do edexcel!
    I actually do AQA chem and physics. well could you explain terminal velocity for me im not very good at it, it bothers me.
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    (Original post by mk_cbc)
    I actually do AQA chem and physics. well could you explain terminal velocity for me im not very good at it, it bothers me.
    Of course!

    The way I see it is imagine someone falling through the air, and imagine they have just jumped out of a plane. The gravity pulling them down is always going to be the same (around 10 m/s2), so that will always stay the same and because you've just jumped out the air resistance will be small because you haven't been in the air long enough.

    So, when your air resistance (drag) is low and reaction force (Gravity pulling you down) is high you accelerate to the ground. You keep accelerating until you're air resistance increases (picture it like if you opened up a parachute.. you would slow down a lot because the air resistance is very very high). Its kind of like that!

    So as the air resistance increases it will reach a point where you can't accelerate anymore as the air resistance and the velocity (speed/graviational force) at which you're falling are equal. Because you can't have anymore acceleration or air resistance as you haven't opened your parachute! meaning you have reached your terminal velocity!

    Then, if you opened a parachute your air resistance would increase with would be larger than the gravitational force pulling you downwards! thats why when you open a parachute people float down to the ground..

    I hope this helped!
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    (Original post by chrlhyms)
    Of course!

    The way I see it is imagine someone falling through the air, and imagine they have just jumped out of a plane. The gravity pulling them down is always going to be the same (around 10 m/s2), so that will always stay the same and because you've just jumped out the air resistance will be small because you haven't been in the air long enough.

    So, when your air resistance (drag) is low and reaction force (Gravity pulling you down) is high you accelerate to the ground. You keep accelerating until you're air resistance increases (picture it like if you opened up a parachute.. you would slow down a lot because the air resistance is very very high). Its kind of like that!

    So as the air resistance increases it will reach a point where you can't accelerate anymore as the air resistance and the velocity (speed/graviational force) at which you're falling are equal. Because you can't have anymore acceleration or air resistance as you haven't opened your parachute! meaning you have reached your terminal velocity!

    Then, if you opened a parachute your air resistance would increase with would be larger than the gravitational force pulling you downwards! thats why when you open a parachute people float down to the ground..

    I hope this helped!
    wow thank you so much i understand it much more now, im so grateful thank you again. omg could you explain alpha beta and gamma particles to me. my teacher taught us but i was completely blank i found it so hard.
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    (Original post by mk_cbc)
    wow thank you so much i understand it much more now, im so grateful thank you again. omg could you explain alpha beta and gamma particles to me. my teacher taught us but i was completely blank i found it so hard.
    Of course!

    Alpha:
    - Slow
    - Heavy
    - Big
    - Strongly ionising
    - Helium Nuclei
    - Stopped by skin or paper
    - Strong positive charge
    - Works by pulling electrons off the shells of atoms

    Beta:
    - Fast moving
    - Small
    - An electron (negative charge)
    - Moderately ionising
    - Works by pushing electrons off of their shells
    - Penetrates moderately far stopped by aluminium

    Gamma:
    - Electromagnetic wave
    - Weakly ionising
    - Penetrates far (stopped by thick lead)
    - Supplies energy to electrons so they are able to break free from their shells
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    (Original post by chrlhyms)
    Of course!

    Alpha:
    - Slow
    - Heavy
    - Big
    - Strongly ionising
    - Helium Nuclei
    - Stopped by skin or paper
    - Strong positive charge
    - Works by pulling electrons off the shells of atoms

    Beta:
    - Fast moving
    - Small
    - An electron (negative charge)
    - Moderately ionising
    - Works by pushing electrons off of their shells
    - Penetrates moderately far stopped by aluminium

    Gamma:
    - Electromagnetic wave
    - Weakly ionising
    - Penetrates far (stopped by thick lead)
    - Supplies energy to electrons so they are able to break free from their shells
    thank you so much again ahh so grateful to you
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    (Original post by mk_cbc)
    thank you so much again ahh so grateful to you

    omg you're welcome!
 
 
 
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