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    Is it possible to get into IB with a degree in computer science from King's college London?
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    yes
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    (Original post by Acrux)
    Is it possible to get into IB with a degree in computer science from King's college London?
    Yes. Care to ask a better question?

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Yes. Care to ask a better question?

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    So are my chances equal to other prestigious universities or should i be applying elsewhere
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    (Original post by Acrux)
    So are my chances equal to other prestigious universities or should i be applying elsewhere
    Depends on your profile. If it's average, your chances are lower than a student at an actual target uni (Oxbridge/LSE/Warwick/UCL/Imperial). If it's strong, the difference is fairly negligible.

    That all said, what's truly important is the OVERALL picture. Not just: 'x' course at 'y' uni with 'z' a level grades. You need to have the right personality, interest in the field, commercial awareness, work experience, extra curriculars and a modicum of intelligence. So no, stop trying to play the 'chance me' game because applying for a career in IB isn't anything like applying to Uni. Do your best to build up the profile required, then when the time comes apply to the companies and divisions that interest you.

    Most gunners won't be on TSR asking about their chances, they'd be networking, reading up about finance, doing CV boosting activities, leading things and most importantly: applying.

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    (Original post by Acrux)
    So are my chances equal to other prestigious universities or should i be applying elsewhere
    this was my worry earlier on in the year because that's the impression you get from TSR - but now i know that all of that stuff means jack :dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin: because I have been to several assessment centers and have an offer from BNP Paribas. there's a whole Technology division dedicated to us computer scientists in every IB so yeah there's loads of opportunities for comp sci graduates (JP morgan invested $8 billion into Tech last year IIRC) .

    once you make it to the first interview, it's all about how you talk (and technical ability which they will test) so your degree, previous grades and all of that stuff goes out of the window. at this stage they do not care whether you're from oxford or london met - now all you need to do is pass the following tests/interviews and assessment center. you will need a 2:1 and you'll need to spend a lot of time writing good answers to the mini-essay questions in the application form. be prepared for the online tests (numericals, logicals, SJTs etc.) that they make you do. they're really tricky at first because of the time restrictions, but PM me if you want to know how you can cheat (guaranteed pass).

    get an internship at an IB asap. they're really easy to get pre-university or your 2nd year of university. also, you will be doing absolutely nothing and earning A LOT.

    if you haven't got an internship, get work experience anywhere.

    if you don't have either, you'll need to be doing your own projects (e.g. web dev, apps) in your spare time. if you have work exp / internship, this will be a bonus and i definitely recommend it because it gave me a lot of ammo in interviews.

    you will need to pretend that you have a huge interest in finance. say you've been interested since the 2008 financial crash, and read up on 2-3 articles on recent events in financial markets that you can then blurt out in interviews (if you get the opportunity).

    also trade paper money online for a few days and put this on your CV and try find openings in interviews to bring this up.

    when you start group exercises, always open up with "i'll keep track of the time" or "i suggest we use the whiteboard for this".

    you're welcome.

    also don't limit yourself to just IBs, consider asset managers like BlackRock, Fidelity, Schroders, Vanguard etc. too. you will basically be getting paid the same and doing the same thing. a lot of people hop between IBs and asset managers.
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    (Original post by El Chapo Jr.)
    this was my worry earlier on in the year because that's the impression you get from TSR - but now i know that all of that stuff means jack :dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin: because I have been to several assessment centers and have an offer from BNP Paribas. there's a whole Technology division dedicated to us computer scientists in every IB so yeah there's loads of opportunities for comp sci graduates (JP morgan invested $8 billion into Tech last year IIRC) .

    once you make it to the first interview, it's all about how you talk (and technical ability which they will test) so your degree, previous grades and all of that stuff goes out of the window. at this stage they do not care whether you're from oxford or london met - now all you need to do is pass the following tests/interviews and assessment center. you will need a 2:1 and you'll need to spend a lot of time writing good answers to the mini-essay questions in the application form. be prepared for the online tests (numericals, logicals, SJTs etc.) that they make you do. they're really tricky at first because of the time restrictions, but PM me if you want to know how you can cheat (guaranteed pass).

    get an internship at an IB asap. they're really easy to get pre-university or your 2nd year of university. also, you will be doing absolutely nothing and earning A LOT.

    if you haven't got an internship, get work experience anywhere.

    if you don't have either, you'll need to be doing your own projects (e.g. web dev, apps) in your spare time (or lie about it on your CV). if you have work exp / internship, this will be a bonus and i definitely recommend it because it gave me a lot of ammo in interviews.

    you will need to pretend that you have a huge interest in finance. say you've been interested since the 2008 financial crash, and read up on 2-3 articles on recent events in financial markets that you can then blurt out in interviews (if you get the opportunity).

    also trade paper money online for a few days and put this on your CV and try find openings in interviews to bring this up. alternatively, you can lie about it, but it's a bit risky because i know for a fact if i didn't play around with paper money a few hrs before one of my interviews i would have been caught out.

    when you start group exercises, always open up with "i'll keep track of the time" or "i suggest we use the whiteboard for this".

    you're welcome.

    also don't limit yourself to just IBs, consider asset managers like BlackRock, Fidelity, Schroders, Vanguard etc. too. you will basically be getting paid the same and doing the same thing. a lot of people hop between IBs and asset managers.
    I don't think telling someone to lie in their CV and interviews is ever good advice lmao.
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    (Original post by El Chapo Jr.)
    this was my worry earlier on in the year because that's the impression you get from TSR - but now i know that all of that stuff means jack :dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin: because I have been to several assessment centers and have an offer from BNP Paribas. there's a whole Technology division dedicated to us computer scientists in every IB so yeah there's loads of opportunities for comp sci graduates (JP morgan invested $8 billion into Tech last year IIRC) .

    once you make it to the first interview, it's all about how you talk (and technical ability which they will test) so your degree, previous grades and all of that stuff goes out of the window. at this stage they do not care whether you're from oxford or london met - now all you need to do is pass the following tests/interviews and assessment center. you will need a 2:1 and you'll need to spend a lot of time writing good answers to the mini-essay questions in the application form. be prepared for the online tests (numericals, logicals, SJTs etc.) that they make you do. they're really tricky at first because of the time restrictions, but PM me if you want to know how you can cheat (guaranteed pass).

    get an internship at an IB asap. they're really easy to get pre-university or your 2nd year of university. also, you will be doing absolutely nothing and earning A LOT.

    if you haven't got an internship, get work experience anywhere.

    if you don't have either, you'll need to be doing your own projects (e.g. web dev, apps) in your spare time (or lie about it on your CV). if you have work exp / internship, this will be a bonus and i definitely recommend it because it gave me a lot of ammo in interviews.

    you will need to pretend that you have a huge interest in finance. say you've been interested since the 2008 financial crash, and read up on 2-3 articles on recent events in financial markets that you can then blurt out in interviews (if you get the opportunity).

    also trade paper money online for a few days and put this on your CV and try find openings in interviews to bring this up. alternatively, you can lie about it, but it's a bit risky because i know for a fact if i didn't play around with paper money a few hrs before one of my interviews i would have been caught out.

    when you start group exercises, always open up with "i'll keep track of the time" or "i suggest we use the whiteboard for this".

    you're welcome.

    also don't limit yourself to just IBs, consider asset managers like BlackRock, Fidelity, Schroders, Vanguard etc. too. you will basically be getting paid the same and doing the same thing. a lot of people hop between IBs and asset managers.
    Aside from the references to lying, which I'll edit out, this is good advice. But I'm fairly certain OP was enquiring about front office roles and not technology.

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    (Original post by Azzer11)
    I don't think telling someone to lie in their CV and interviews is ever good advice lmao.
    copy & pasting what i said on another thread:

    the whole recruitment process basically just assesses how well you can lie (seriously).

    when they ask you what are your weaknesses? you think they want to hear actual weaknesses like "i'm lazy, bad in the mornings and smoke a lot of weed"? game over. they want you to tell them a strength and twist it into a weakness (e.g. the classic "my main weakness is that i'm a perfectionist" ).

    when they ask you why us and not our competitors? the honest answer is something along the lines of "i am indifferent, the only reason i applied to you guys was because i saw your job listing first" or "you pay more", but if you told them that that's a straight rejection - so again, they do not expect you to give an honest answer. they know you have applied to all of their competitors and spout the same sh*t in their interviews.

    when you get 45 minute interviews consisting of purely tell us about a situation where... do you think they expect you to have been in all of these situations? i can guarantee you now that at least 50% of the scenarios you get asked about you will have never experienced. if you sit there with a blank face or reply "haven't been in that scenario" every time you would probably get a rejection before you leave the interview room rofl. here, you need to lie and they expect you to.

    they literally want you to BS them lol. the guys on this thread trying to take the moral high ground are the same guys that end up not getting jobs.
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    (Original post by El Chapo Jr.)
    this was my worry earlier on in the year because that's the impression you get from TSR - but now i know that all of that stuff means jack :dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin: because I have been to several assessment centers and have an offer from BNP Paribas. there's a whole Technology division dedicated to us computer scientists in every IB so yeah there's loads of opportunities for comp sci graduates (JP morgan invested $8 billion into Tech last year IIRC) .

    once you make it to the first interview, it's all about how you talk (and technical ability which they will test) so your degree, previous grades and all of that stuff goes out of the window. at this stage they do not care whether you're from oxford or london met - now all you need to do is pass the following tests/interviews and assessment center. you will need a 2:1 and you'll need to spend a lot of time writing good answers to the mini-essay questions in the application form. be prepared for the online tests (numericals, logicals, SJTs etc.) that they make you do. they're really tricky at first because of the time restrictions, but PM me if you want to know how you can cheat (guaranteed pass).

    get an internship at an IB asap. they're really easy to get pre-university or your 2nd year of university. also, you will be doing absolutely nothing and earning A LOT.

    if you haven't got an internship, get work experience anywhere.

    if you don't have either, you'll need to be doing your own projects (e.g. web dev, apps) in your spare time (or lie about it on your CV). if you have work exp / internship, this will be a bonus and i definitely recommend it because it gave me a lot of ammo in interviews.

    you will need to pretend that you have a huge interest in finance. say you've been interested since the 2008 financial crash, and read up on 2-3 articles on recent events in financial markets that you can then blurt out in interviews (if you get the opportunity).

    also trade paper money online for a few days and put this on your CV and try find openings in interviews to bring this up. alternatively, you can lie about it, but it's a bit risky because i know for a fact if i didn't play around with paper money a few hrs before one of my interviews i would have been caught out.

    when you start group exercises, always open up with "i'll keep track of the time" or "i suggest we use the whiteboard for this".

    you're welcome.

    also don't limit yourself to just IBs, consider asset managers like BlackRock, Fidelity, Schroders, Vanguard etc. too. you will basically be getting paid the same and doing the same thing. a lot of people hop between IBs and asset managers.
    I have to say You actually give really good advice apart from the lying part. Did you apply for the technology division in banks or for front office investment banking?
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    i applied to tech
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    (Original post by El Chapo Jr.)
    i applied to tech
    Why didyou apply for banks and not tech companies like Google, Amazon, Microsoft? Isn't that where most tech people aspire to work?
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    (Original post by Trapz99)
    Why didn't you apply for banks and not tech companies like Google, Amazon, Microsoft? Isn't that where most tech people aspire to work?
    It's veeeeeerrry tough to get a job at a top tech firm. The interviews are much more technically focused than they are at the banks. Your CS fundamentals (algorithms, data structures etc) need to be **** hot to even stand a chance at one of their 45 minute phone interviews or 3-5 back to back on-site interviews. Pay is solid though.


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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    It's veeeeeerrry tough to get a job at a top tech firm. The interviews are much more technically focused than they are at the banks. Your CS fundamentals (algorithms, data structures etc) need to be **** hot to even stand a chance at one of their 45 minute phone interviews or 3-5 back to back on-site interviews. Pay is solid though.


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    I actually had no idea it's that difficult. Is it harder to get into than banking?
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    (Original post by Trapz99)
    I actually had no idea it's that difficult. Is it harder to get into than banking?
    Probably similar in competition to front office IB/S&T.
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    (Original post by Trapz99)
    I actually had no idea it's that difficult. Is it harder to get into than banking?
    You definitely need more depth of knowledge around your subject than you do for banking, from what I gather from speaking to techies.

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