Stk1010
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Would the below scenario constitute as Slander?

- Guy A was involved in a police investigation and was given a police caution. Guy B found out and decided to spread this information around town and amongst Guy A's friends thus damaging Guy A's reputation and potentially lowering his job prospects, as nobody wants to hire him. Could Guy A sue Guy B for Slander?


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Nameless Ghoul
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(Original post by Stk1010)
Would the below scenario constitute as Slander?

- Guy A was involved in a police investigation and was given a police caution. Guy B found out and decided to spread this information around town and amongst Guy A's friends thus damaging Guy A's reputation and potentially lowering his job prospects, as nobody wants to hire him. Could Guy A sue Guy B for Slander?
Is it substantially true?
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Stk1010
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(Original post by Nameless Ghoul)
Is it substantially true?
What do you mean by substantially? It is factually true, but there's no evidence other than what Guy B witnessed.


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Thomb
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No because what B said about A is true?
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Stk1010
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(Original post by Thomb)
No because what B said about A is true?
Even if A wanted to keep the whole thing a secrete? Surely it's not B's place to spread this around, especially as it's defaming A and potentially losing him money as he can't get a job locally?


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Good bloke
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(Original post by Stk1010)
Even if A wanted to keep the whole thing a secrete? Surely it's not B's place to spread this around, especially as it's defaming A and potentially losing him money as he can't get a job locally?


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The desire for secrecy is irrelevant to slander. If what person B said is true it cannot be slander.
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Nameless Ghoul
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(Original post by Stk1010)
Even if A wanted to keep the whole thing a secrete? Surely it's not B's place to spread this around, especially as it's defaming A and potentially losing him money as he can't get a job locally?


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Something is only defamatory if it is untrue.S2(1) of the Defamation Act 2013 is very clear on this point.

"It is a defence to an action for defamation for the defendant to show that the imputation conveyed by the statement complained of is substantially true."

C's wanting to keep it a secret is not relevant to defamation or indeed slander. And it doesn't come under privacy or confidence, either, because C acted without moral scruple.
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JamesN88
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The action or crime of making a false spoken statement damaging to a person’s reputation

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/de...nglish/slander

It isn't false so it isn't slander.
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JamesN88
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(Original post by Stk1010)
Even if A wanted to keep the whole thing a secrete? Surely it's not B's place to spread this around, especially as it's defaming A and potentially losing him money as he can't get a job locally?


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There's a difference between being legally wrong and socially considered an :dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin:.
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Stk1010
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Thanks for the replies, interesting stuff!

Out if curiosity is there anything that Guy A can do about it (legally)?


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Nameless Ghoul
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(Original post by Stk1010)
Thanks for the replies, interesting stuff!

Out if curiosity is there anything that Guy A can do about it (legally)?


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Kill the alleged tortfeasor and make it look like suicide.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by Stk1010)
Thanks for the replies, interesting stuff!

Out if curiosity is there anything that Guy A can do about it (legally)?


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He can learn a few lessons: (a) be careful who you treat as a friend, (b) be even more careful which friends you trust with confidences, (c) discriminate which facts about yourself can lead to harm if well known, (d) don't get involved in criminality as it can have unfortunate consequences for the criminal, even if no real punishment is inflicted by the justice system.
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Nameless Ghoul
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#13
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#13
(Original post by Stk1010)
Thanks for the replies, interesting stuff!

Out if curiosity is there anything that Guy A can do about it (legally)?


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Wait a sec, was this a law problem question or were you looking for legal advice?
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Stk1010
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#14
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(Original post by Nameless Ghoul)
Wait a sec, was this a law problem question or were you looking for legal advice?
It's a law problem question, aha! Just playing devils advocate a bit.


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