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    Hi Folks, wonder if you would so kind as to help someone looking to study MA or PGDip in social work in 2017!

    Just wondering what my chances of being accepted onto a course would be - I graduated with a 2:1 in Politics in 2010 and I have worked in social care since (Mental Health and Homelessness) so have billions of hours experience which I hope puts me in good standing. Doing ok in term of English/Maths/Science and IT ability etc, done loads of training and CPD whilst at work (Working for a Local Authority so had to!) although I only got average GCSEs and A-Levels (personal issues but also I was totally clueless about life and what I wanted to do)

    I have done quite a lot of research but still getting my head around a lot of things, I am slightly worried that not being in education for over 5 years would mean that I need to do an access course. Whilst I can appreciate that people need to be at a level where they're able to complete the academic requirements of the course - If I took 2 years out of work and then a further 2 to study the MA, I wouldn't have enough money to live on. I've tried speaking to a couple of admission depts. but they don't seem keen to comment...

    Anyone that can offer some insight or advice? Am worried that my dream of becoming a social worker is out of reach due to my financial situation and am getting myself wound up about it!

    Edit: Should probably add that I got my undergraduate degree in 2010 and am now 27 years old so out of education for at least 7 years when I apply.

    Thank you
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    Hi there, I have been looking into applying for a MA or post grad in Social Work as well. I got my degree in Sociology 17 years ago however! Since then I have worked in various roles which give good experience for a career in Social Work. I do have a more recent post grad qualification in rehabilitation. I have contacted various universities and as I have an E in GCSE maths I would be rejected! Seems so unfair but I am looking at having to study maths again! I would be interested to know if anyone who is or has studied social work has done this without the GCSE maths. I think you have great skills and a recent relevant degree so would encourage you to reply. The best of luck. X
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    I wouldn't worry too much about having been out of education for a while. I trained alongside individuals who hadn't been in education for decades, and that diversity in experiences and pathways is exactly what the profession needs. The profession will need that range of recruitment diversity if it wants to ensure empathic practice remains at the forefront of its practice.

    There's nothing I can really say that will really put your mind at ease. The only advice I can give you is to consistently emphasise your experiences, link them to your aspirations as a social worker, and be reflective on your strengths and weaknesses. A key characteristic of any social worker is knowing where their boundaries lie, so if you can highlight to them what you want to get from the course then that will go a long way towards highlighting you have the reflective skills needed to undertake intensive training. I've seen some students panic at the idea of telling an interviewer about what their weaknesses are, because it standards contrary to emphasising yourself as the best candidate of the bunch. However, if you can emphasise to them where your knowledge gaps lie, and highlight how the training will help you fill those gaps, then you'll be thinking like a social worker. It's a skill you'll be forever doing, as Continuing Professional Development (CPD) training is a key requirement for the entire lifespan of a practicing social worker. It's never too early to start it.

    (Original post by Rhb200)
    Hi there, I have been looking into applying for a MA or post grad in Social Work as well. I got my degree in Sociology 17 years ago however! Since then I have worked in various roles which give good experience for a career in Social Work. I do have a more recent post grad qualification in rehabilitation. I have contacted various universities and as I have an E in GCSE maths I would be rejected! Seems so unfair but I am looking at having to study maths again! I would be interested to know if anyone who is or has studied social work has done this without the GCSE maths. I think you have great skills and a recent relevant degree so would encourage you to reply. The best of luck. X
    Unfortunately, I think studying Maths to grade C level would really be in your best interests. Sadly, social work is a very bureaucratic profession, and you'll be expected to handle budgeting and other financial matters whilst working in very stressful situations. It's not always as straightforward as getting a calculator to help with it, so having those math skills will really come in useful to help ensure you don't run into any unexpected issues with emergency paperwork etc.

    I certainly understand your frustration though. I have a grade C in math, but I also struggle with it. As a result, some of the financial paperwork I had chucked my way really affected my practice. Having those skills fresh in your mind will be of invaluable help to you.
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    Hi LPK

    Thank's for this, very reassuring info. The more I look into things the more it's obvious I'm over-thinking entry requirements. I've also been made aware of http://thinkahead.org/ which looks promising.

    Cheers

    CC
 
 
 
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