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asperges syndrom watch

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    okay, I know I probs spelt it wrong anyway!!!

    I have met someone who will be helping me with kids and I think that he has asperges syndrom becasue when he didn't understand me he said no quite aggresively and didn't get any of my jokes and had that certain thing, that I couldn't put my foot on, so I spoke to my mum who is a teacher and had many kids like that and she says hes probs got a light version. No this doesn't effect me in any way, and I dont mind, but I was just wondering if anyone has any suggestions of how to make it easier for him?
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    what are the symtoms of asperges? i've never really understood it, i don't want to sound ignorant
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    well, as far as I know...

    it is a mild form of autisim
    a person could be quick to say no if they dont understand something
    they have to have some patterns, e.g. at school the classroom can't be changed around because they can't 'deal' with it
    The person doesn't like to be touched
    They dont like noisy sounds, e.g.. a school fire bell
    Often good at maths and science but not things like history
    Works things out logically
    Often gives up if they cant do something
    Have what may appear as wierd rules, e.g. If they are eating, they cant eat anything green cos they dont like it or the food cant touch each other,

    I got this from my mum and the book of the incident of the dog in the middle of the night!

    Correct me though if I'm wrong!
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    (Original post by historyhoney)
    well, as far as I know...

    it is a mild form of autisim Agreed
    a person could be quick to say no if they dont understand something Not necessarily true
    they have to have some patterns, e.g. at school the classroom can't be changed around because they can't 'deal' with it Agreed, though not always obvious; they are certainly "people of habit"
    The person doesn't like to be touched Generally true
    They dont like noisy sounds, e.g.. a school fire bell Not necessarily true
    Often good at maths and science but not things like history Not true in my experience
    Works things out logically Generally true
    Often gives up if they cant do something Not in my experience, actually, can be somewhat "obsessive" and dogmatic
    Have what may appear as wierd rules, e.g. If they are eating, they cant eat anything green cos they dont like it or the food cant touch each other, Agreed; goes with being "people of habit"

    I got this from my mum and the book of the incident of the dog in the middle of the night!

    Correct me though if I'm wrong!
    Generally what you say is right; I know two people with Asperger's - they are actually quite different people and display different behaviour. (I think "symptoms" is too strong a word - they're not invalids!)
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    yeah, I had a kid with aspergus when I did this two years ago, but he had a really bad form and unforchunatly at the time I didn't know how to handle it, as he just said no to everything
    'do you know your name?' NO

    But I know I should of said it all different;y, it was just in some case, do I give him simple jobs or can I say things like, look aafter the kids for a while, is this too general?
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    The effect of being unspecific is a difficult call. Inside he will know what you mean, and I think that if he feels he can handle your request, it will be fine.

    The difficulty arises when he can't - he will react badly, and not cope. This is because of being "awkward" in a social sense, he may be unable/unwilling to improvise, even if he can think of a course of action.

    It all goes with "habits" and wanting to be "in control" (not be touched etc.) - he'll like the reasssurance of being confident about what he's doing.

    I would always give him fairly precise instructions, mentor each time he does something for the first time, and tell him when he's got it right, so he knows it will be right next time. A contingency (a phone no. etc.) might be a good idea, but he may (in my experience) be unwilling to call upon this.

    To be honest, he may not be the ideal person to be working with kids - you need someone who is resourceful, flexible, relaxed and able to empathise. In my experience the latter will be especially tricky.
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    btw. I noticed you mentioned jokes...

    In my experience, people with Asperger's do have a sense of humour. What they won't laugh at is conventional "construed" jokes - they won't see the point of them. e.g. "A man walks into a bar...OUCH!"

    They are more likely to laugh at things like funny comments and funny situations, e.g. sketches/sitcoms etc. though maybe not in the presence of people they don't know well. This depends on their self-confidence, gven "awkwardness" in childhood.
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    (Original post by historyhoney)
    okay, I know I probs spelt it wrong anyway!!!

    I have met someone who will be helping me with kids and I think that he has asperges syndrom becasue when he didn't understand me he said no quite aggresively and didn't get any of my jokes and had that certain thing, that I couldn't put my foot on, so I spoke to my mum who is a teacher and had many kids like that and she says hes probs got a light version. No this doesn't effect me in any way, and I dont mind, but I was just wondering if anyone has any suggestions of how to make it easier for him?
    Well, don't make jokes around him or be sarcastic, it really annoys us when people start laughing and we don't know why.
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    (Original post by historyhoney)
    well, as far as I know...

    it is a mild form of autisim
    a person could be quick to say no if they dont understand something
    they have to have some patterns, e.g. at school the classroom can't be changed around because they can't 'deal' with it
    The person doesn't like to be touched
    They dont like noisy sounds, e.g.. a school fire bell
    Often good at maths and science but not things like history
    Works things out logically
    Often gives up if they cant do something
    Have what may appear as wierd rules, e.g. If they are eating, they cant eat anything green cos they dont like it or the food cant touch each other,

    I got this from my mum and the book of the incident of the dog in the middle of the night!

    Correct me though if I'm wrong!

    And what about the obsessions, you can't forget that.
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    As far as I'm aware, Asperger's also affects social skills, so sufferers may not know how to interact with people: they might start a conversation with random strangers for example.
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    (Original post by musicman)
    As far as I'm aware, Asperger's also affects social skills, so sufferers may not know how to interact with people: they might start a conversation with random strangers for example.
    They are more very socially immature, so they might not know how to react in a certain situation, or you get very nervious in crowds.
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    aspergers and autism are notoriously hard to diagnose. I suggest that the amatuer psychiatrists here calm themselves down before they hurt someone.

    MB
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    (Original post by musicboy)
    aspergers and autism are notoriously hard to diagnose. I suggest that the amatuer psychiatrists here calm themselves down before they hurt someone.

    MB
    Well me actually being an afflicted one, I think I can speak with some authority.
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    (Original post by wiwarin_mir)
    And what about the obsessions, you can't forget that.

    eh?
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    (Original post by historyhoney)
    eh?
    people with aspergers syndrome have obsessions, like mine are star trek, computers and anything japanese.
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    oh, right, I will remember that, can u help me to explain this, the boy had a new phone and when asked to tkae his number, he didn't know how, and said it was a mind block, although it could be a new phone??
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    (Original post by musicboy)
    aspergers and autism are notoriously hard to diagnose. I suggest that the amatuer psychiatrists here calm themselves down before they hurt someone.

    MB
    Why don't you shut up or make a useful contribution, which you might be able to do if you read the thread... :rolleyes:

    You will notice that 1 person is asking about the problem, I have replied with my experience, as I know to people who suffer from it, and someone who actually suffers from it has also contributed.

    That makes this thread a resounding success, and makes every contribution justifiable..."amatuer psychiatrists" - how insulting!
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    (Original post by historyhoney)
    oh, right, I will remember that, can u help me to explain this, the boy had a new phone and when asked to tkae his number, he didn't know how, and said it was a mind block, although it could be a new phone??
    It's normal for sufferers to be a little "detached" and "in their own world". They don't automatically think about knowing their phone's number; it just doesn't occur to them.
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    (Original post by musicboy)
    aspergers and autism are notoriously hard to diagnose. I suggest that the amatuer psychiatrists here calm themselves down before they hurt someone.

    MB
    Oh, I by know means want to hurt someone, but some of this is helping me to get a vague Idea about how he might react, as I dont want to make him fell uncomfortable in any way, this is going to be fun!!
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    (Original post by historyhoney)
    Oh, I by know means want to hurt someone, but some of this is helping me to get a vague Idea about how he might react, as I dont want to make him fell uncomfortable in any way, this is going to be fun!!
    If you want get get his attention, try to find out what his obsessions are and ask him about them, although you may want to be ready for a torrent of information.
 
 
 
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