CBT vs Counselling? Watch

Anonymous #1
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What is the difference, would it help to have both?
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Little Popcorns
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Cbt you actually engage in it and do tasks outside of sessions. Counselling you just talk at them and they bounce off ideas but mostly just listen.
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username861942
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(Original post by Anonymous)
What is the difference, would it help to have both?
They are different approaches. CBT looks at your thoughts and your actions and how they are linked. It helps you look at the evidence, which can help with anxiety and depression e.g you feel you are ugly so you avoid social contact because you fear getting rejected. CBT helps you look at the situation from an evidence point of view, so quite possibly, there is no evidence that you are ugly e.g you have had partners before, and it helps you look at alternative actions, so maybe you go out with your friend to somewhere relaxed.

Counselling is more talking about what is going on for you. They are much less likely to give advice, rather listen and support you, and help you come up with solutions.


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~Tara~
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There are many different types of counselling. Some therapists are quiet and don't do any tasks and some do tasks and set homework. Even CBT can be delivered in different ways.

CBT can work well with anxiety. It's often short term work but it doesn't go too much into how you're feeling and why. Other therapies can last longer depending on finding or where you get it. For example, sometimes you can only get 6 weeks in a school or uni but elsewhere you can get as long as you need.

Personally I think it's worth trying one and seeing how you feel. But it's important to remember that not all therapists are the same. So if you don't like CBT because of the therapist, it's worth trying CBT with a different one.
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tinkerbelle2
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The above posters have all summarised both of them really well but would just like to add I've had both CBT and counselling and found both to be equally helpful and beneficial! You could always try one and if you aren't keen could try the other?

I'd fully recommend both. Whilst I'm not one hundred percent "cured" from my anxieties, the hold they have over me is much less!
I also like the idea of hypnotherapy and also a mindfulness and meditation workshop!
Good luck!


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Kindred
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(Original post by Anonymous)
What is the difference, would it help to have both?
People here have done a pretty good job explaining them both, but i'll see what I might be able to add.

Counseling is a little different depending on who you see but basically it's just talking. They can't relly give you oppintions or advice and just guide you in your own talking and thinking.
I personally had a bad experience with counseling so i'm not a huge fan, but I think others do find it helpful. I think it would be more useful as a side to actua, l therapy in most cases though since they can't do much other than talk.

CBT is different depending on who you see too and it can be focused depending on conditions. The person doing it with you will tend to have more training and can give actual advice and things. You can also have group CBT, which is interesting cos it involves more input form others.
CBT is focused on your thought processes and why you feel how you do. I had group CBT and private CBT and I found the group one better (thought it does take getting used to) because i felt less alone in how I felt. It is a more active approach than counselling and you may be given things to try inside or outside of therapy.

I would suggest you try both if you can and if you don't like either of them to start with keep at it for a littl longer. They are different approaches and may compliment eachother. If I had to pick one I would personally choose CBT or other therapy, but it will be different for others and you may prefer counseling.
Another type of therapy i know involves something called mindfulness (kinda like a meditation like thing). I find it odd personally, but I know others it has worked really well for.
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louloubelle21
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I have personally only had CBT but it worked really well for me and I would definitely recommend it. I am also learning about it in Psychology and it is a therapy that tries to challenge your negative thoughts and change them into more positive ones. The cognitive bit is due to the mental processes your mind goes through and because the negative thoughts become automatic whereas the behavioural bit comes from the aim to change your behaviour and how to react and think to your trigger situations.

CBT is quite active and gets you doing stuff to try and change the mental processes causing the mental illness. I also found it helped me understand my anxiety a lot better and when I was suffering, I knew exactly why, what was happening, and how I could try and challenge it.

The only thing is you do have to practise it quite a lot outside of the actual therapy time to change the way your mind thinks and reacts for it to really work.

Hope this helps
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Charlotte's Web
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(Original post by Anonymous)
What is the difference, would it help to have both?
A combination of CBT and counselling is usually very effective, but obviously this depends on your own personal preferences. Unfortunately it's difficult to get them both at the same time just because of waiting list times.

I'm not going to repeat what has been said above as there are some really good points, however there is a really good site developed by the NHS in Scotland which has CBT-style self help guides which you might find useful, and which might give you an idea of whether CBT is suited to you. When you enter the site, click 'enter' then work through the tool until you find a heading that describes your situation and you'll be given a guide. You can also to click on the 'professionals' section, then in the middle of the page, select a self help guide. You can also choose self help tools at the bottom to make your own self help guide, if you don't like all of the activities.

http://www.moodjuice.scot.nhs.uk
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