Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I've been determined to get the A grades that I deserve this summer, i'm studying at AS level at the moment and I've been doing constant revision on average around 6 hours a day. I'm intensely studying law and sociology, however some of the stuff doesn't seem to be consolidating in my brain! I've adjusted my revision technique as such and it doesn't seem to be working. HELP ME !!! my main priority is law and in particular unit one seems to be going in one ear and out the other or I merely forget it days after revising it. ANY TIPS, MOTIVATION OR ADVICE?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AlderKate)
    I've been determined to get the A grades that I deserve this summer, i'm studying at AS level at the moment and I've been doing constant revision on average around 6 hours a day. I'm intensely studying law and sociology, however some of the stuff doesn't seem to be consolidating in my brain! I've adjusted my revision technique as such and it doesn't seem to be working. HELP ME !!! my main priority is law and in particular unit one seems to be going in one ear and out the other or I merely forget it days after revising it. ANY TIPS, MOTIVATION OR ADVICE?
    Firstly, calm down.
    I'm serious, obey me.

    If you stress, you're going to start to envision crazy things, you're going to be more pessimistic, and that's gonna make you stress even more and distract you from revision. It's a vicious circle.
    Once you relax, you can then realise where things are going wrong without suddenly panicking like crazy.

    Secondly, it seems that it's a case of revision technique than a case of motivation.
    How exactly are you revising?

    Are you doing any of these methods:

    --> Reading through the textbook
    That won't work. This is reading the world's mot boring novel in the world, and you don't tend to remember those kinds of novels. Unless your book is beyond amazing and visually fantastic, or it really sticks in your head just by reading it (which I doubt), don't use this method.

    --> Write notes from the textbook
    I really really really don't understand why people do this. I see this all the time, my friend reads the textbook, then copies it word for word, and when I go test her she hasn't got a ****in clue.
    This is what you are doing. You are going to literally make a carbon copy of the textbook, you're a human printer. Why the fuk would you do all that work? And more importantly, why does your copy make you learn, but not your textbook? Why not just learn the memorise the bloody textbook? Maybe I'm missing something, maybe rewriting every ****in word means it sticks in your brain. If you do this, and you find it's not working, I'm not surprised.

    --> Rewrite your notes
    Again, I see this in my revision freak friends, they have good notes, but for some reason, they feel the need to write the same thing again. "Oh I'm just making it into a flashcard", "Oh I'm just making it into a poster". Ok, if your notes are **** then by all means rewrite them and make it such that you understand them, and posters and diagrams are very useful as visuals. But don't just literally rewrite your notes. However, this rewriting thing is a useful skill.

    --> Reading the specification
    If you only read the spec (which I doubt you do), that's not enough. BUT it's good on the side. It's like a little checklist to see what you actually need to know for the exam because textbooks can be outdated.

    So how are you supposed to learn?
    Past papers!

    Well, they come afterwards. What I suggest first is, yes read your notes or the textbook but like I said do not go for the whole thing. Maybe read a page or even a paragraph if you're struggling. And re-read it and pay attention such that you understand it. And then prove it by either saying it to yourself (I like to record myself uttering biological definitions) or writing it down as notes.

    The difference is that your notes are notes you understand in your own words and that you've created from memory. Of course, don't write in pure words, like slang or abbreviations because you'll probably need technical or key language in your exam. That's the bits you need to really remember, but not absolutely everything. Once you're confident that you've understood the whole concept, prove it with past paper questions. I cannot stress enough, they are the holy grail of revision. They are a simulation of what's gonna be waiting for you this summer. If you're getting wrong answers, perhaps it's misunderstanding the questions, misunderstanding the topic, missing some key language or the way you word things. If you really don't understand the topic, or exactly what the question is asking, speak to a friend or a teacher. Seriously, exploit your teachers while you can. They're all yours, there's probably workshops as well that can help.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
    Help with your A-levels

    All the essentials

    The adventure begins mug

    Student life: what to expect

    What it's really like going to uni

    Rosette

    Essay expert

    Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

    Uni match

    Uni match

    Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

    Study planner

    Create a study plan

    Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

    Study planner

    Resources by subject

    Everything from mind maps to class notes.

    Hands typing

    Degrees without fees

    Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

    A student doing homework

    Study tips from A* students

    Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

    Study help links and info

    Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

    Sponsored content:

    HEAR

    HEAR

    Find out how a Higher Education Achievement Report can help you prove your achievements.

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.