abdilighter
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Why is the Electromotive force always less than the terminal potential difference ? I cant seem to get my head around his concept.
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joostan
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(Original post by abdilighter)
Why is the Electromotive force always less than the terminal potential difference ? I cant seem to get my head around his concept.
It's been a while but I'll give it a go:
The reverse holds actually, the battery has an internal resistance which causes the e.m.f to drop so the e.m.f actually exceeds the potential difference.

However, this is not always the case, for a battery being recharged, the terminal potential difference will actually exceed the e.m.f.

A quick google gave a couple of links you might like to look at:
Regarding the internal resistance.
Regarding the recharging battery.
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thefatone
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(Original post by abdilighter)
Why is the Electromotive force always less than the terminal potential difference ? I cant seem to get my head around his concept.
emf=V+Ir
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derpz
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(Original post by abdilighter)
Why is the Electromotive force always less than the terminal potential difference ? I cant seem to get my head around his concept.
TPD = EMF - Lost Volts, so the EMF is always less as it takes into consideration the lost volts which are deducted as it results in energy dissipated as heat etc
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abdilighter
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(Original post by derpz)
TPD = EMF - Lost Volts, so the EMF is always less as it takes into consideration the lost volts which are deducted as it results in energy dissipated as heat etc
Thank you !
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Kyx
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(Original post by abdilighter)
Why is the Electromotive force always less than the terminal potential difference ? I cant seem to get my head around his concept.
Work has to be done to get the charges to leave the battery, hence some of the energy is lost due to this 'internal resistance'.
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username2176541
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(Original post by abdilighter)
Why is the Electromotive force always less than the terminal potential difference ? I cant seem to get my head around his concept.
(Original post by joostan)
It's been a while but I'll give it a go:
The battery has an internal resistance which causes the e.m.f to drop.

However, this is not always the case, for a battery being recharged, the terminal potential difference will actually exceed the e.m.f.

A quick google gave a couple of links you might like to look at:
Regarding the internal resistance.
Regarding the recharging battery.
(Original post by thefatone)
emf=V+Ir
(Original post by derpz)
TPD = EMF - Lost Volts, so the EMF is always less as it takes into consideration the lost volts which are deducted as it results in energy dissipated as heat etc
(Original post by abdilighter)
Thank you !
(Original post by Kyx)
Work has to be done to get the charges to leave the battery, hence some of the energy is lost due to this 'internal resistance'.

isn't V = emf - Ir.
So emf is never less than V
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Kyx
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(Original post by Xenon17)
isn't V = emf - Ir.
So emf is never less than V
Yes.
Emf is always greater.
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derpz
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(Original post by Xenon17)
isn't V = emf - Ir.
So emf is never less than V
Yeah, just remember that equation and you should be fine!
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username2176541
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(Original post by Kyx)
Yes.
Emf is always greater.
(Original post by derpz)
Yeah, just remember that equation and you should be fine!

Yh but

(Original post by abdilighter)
Why is the Electromotive force always less than the terminal potential difference ? I cant seem to get my head around his concept.
thats where the OP has gone wrong
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joostan
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(Original post by Xenon17)
isn't V = emf - Ir.
So emf is never less than V
Yes, that's what I said, although I think I misread the question, so my answer makes less sense.
Thanks for this, will edit.
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Kyx
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(Original post by Xenon17)
Yh but



thats where the OP has gone wrong
Yes
The OP went wrong saying it is less: it is more
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thefatone
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(Original post by Xenon17)
isn't V = emf - Ir.
So emf is never less than V
just rearranged it..
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Kyx
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(Original post by thefatone)
just rearranged it..
v = emf - Ir

adding Ir to both sides gives: v + Ir = emf - Ir + Ir

v + Ir = emf

Or

emf = v + Ir

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