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M1 friction question involving rough wire watch

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Size:  77.1 KB hi I would like to know why the normal reaction force is acting in the direction shown in the diagram. Why wouldnt R act in the direction opposite to the one in the diagram? I get why F acts in that way by the way. Thanks!
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    (Original post by coconut64)
    Name:  Screenshot_2016-04-05-23-02-53_1.jpg
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Size:  77.1 KB hi I would like to know why the normal reaction force is acting in the direction shown in the diagram. Why wouldnt R act in the direction opposite to the one in the diagram? I get why F acts in that way by the way. Thanks!
    This is how I think of it, which then doesn't guarantee that it's correct, is that the wire needs to pull back in the opposite direction in order to stay stationary, as otherwise it would be massive pulled to the right

    For example, if I held a ball in my hand, the ball has mass so pushes downwards, in order for my hand to remain upright and not helplessly fall to the ground it needs to exert a force upwards to maintain equilibrium
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    (Original post by KaylaB)
    This is how I think of it, which then doesn't guarantee that it's correct, is that the wire needs to pull back in the opposite direction in order to stay stationary, as otherwise it would be massive pulled to the right

    For example, if I held a ball in my hand, the ball has mass so pushes downwards, in order for my hand to remain upright and not helplessly fall to the ground it needs to exert a force upwards to maintain equilibrium
    Ah ! That makes sense and your analogy seems to work in other similar questions as well. Thanks, thats quite clever.
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    (Original post by coconut64)
    Ah ! That makes sense and your analogy seems to work in other similar questions as well. Thanks, thats quite clever.
    No problem :hat2:
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    there must be a force to the left as the tension has a component to the right. as ^^ said.
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    (Original post by KaylaB)
    This is how I think of it, which then doesn't guarantee that it's correct
    It is. :-)
 
 
 
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