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    I'm getting a bit worried about my M3 exam in just over a months time.
    I can do most questions where a diagram is provided to you alright but when I have to draw a diagram myself I tend to struggle.
    My main issue is with identifying right angled triangles (maybe that's a stupid thing to struggle with).
    I though maybe a way to combat this would maybe to identify the original right angled triangle with the angle alpha for example and draw it on tracing paper and rotate it on the page so I can see where other right angled triangles would fit and which angle would be the angle alpha.
    This is mainly a problem in circular motion, inclined planes and moments questions.
    Are we allowed to request tracing paper in the exam or do you even think this would help?
    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Windowswind123)
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    I had the same thoughts as you; unfortunately: you're not allowed tracing paper.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    I had the same thoughts as you; unfortunately: you're not allowed tracing paper.
    Ah
    Alright thanks anyway.
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    (Original post by Windowswind123)
    Ah
    Alright thanks anyway.
    Hopefully somebody who is actually any good at mechanics will pop up with some advice, though.
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    (Original post by Windowswind123)
    My main issue is with identifying right angled triangles (maybe that's a stupid thing to struggle with).
    I though maybe a way to combat this would maybe to identify the original right angled triangle with the angle alpha for example and draw it on tracing paper and rotate it on the page so I can see where other right angled triangles would fit and which angle would be the angle alpha.
    It's not a good idea to attempt this method, as diagram are often not drawn to scale. And even if they are, angles that look like right angles, aren't necessarily.

    You need a geometrical justification. Putting in additional horizontal and vertical lines may help. Then basic geometry.

    If you have to draw a diagram yourself, don't make a right angle unless you know it is, e.g. tangent to a radius of a circle.
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    Don't bother redrawing diagrams, just use an HB pencil to draw on verticals and horizontals on the given diagrams ghostwalker said. DON'T use a pen - it's impossible to fix in case you marked something incorrectly.

    When things are hinged/turning and you have to take moments about awkward places, you might want to draw a new diagram. Try marking in all the required angles and make it very roughly to scale as it'll help identify angles better.

    You are allowed a compass, ruler and protractor however, which I find very handy for circular motion or CofM questions.
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    (Original post by Windowswind123)
    I'm getting a bit worried about my M3 exam in just over a months time.
    I can do most questions where a diagram is provided to you alright but when I have to draw a diagram myself I tend to struggle.
    My main issue is with identifying right angled triangles (maybe that's a stupid thing to struggle with).
    I though maybe a way to combat this would maybe to identify the original right angled triangle with the angle alpha for example and draw it on tracing paper and rotate it on the page so I can see where other right angled triangles would fit and which angle would be the angle alpha.
    This is mainly a problem in circular motion, inclined planes and moments questions.
    Are we allowed to request tracing paper in the exam or do you even think this would help?
    Thanks!
    Make sure when you draw a diagram that the angles are a long way from 45 degrees, e.g. 20 degrees, not necessarily what they are supposed to be. Then you know that all of the small angles are the same.
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    (Original post by tiny hobbit)
    Make sure when you draw a diagram that the angles are a long way from 45 degrees, e.g. 20 degrees, not necessarily what they are supposed to be. Then you know that all of the small angles are the same.
    Thanks, that sounds like a good idea.
 
 
 
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