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    I have recently been looking at US universities and have found that for my situation they are much more affordable. I also prefer the liberal arts system, meaning that my education will be much broader rather than the UK system of specializing. I most likely want to major in history.

    Can anyone give me a brief outline of the difference in the admissions process, and especially the ones for university's like Harvard or Yale.
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    (Original post by harrypblack)
    I have recently been looking at US universities and have found that for my situation they are much more affordable. I also prefer the liberal arts system, meaning that my education will be much broader rather than the UK system of specializing. I most likely want to major in history.

    Can anyone give me a brief outline of the difference in the admissions process, and especially the ones for university's like Harvard or Yale.
    There's a lot to say, but since you ask about admissions specifically, here goes ('they' means US universitIES btw):
    They can indeed afford to be far more generous with finances - though they over-charge the rest, frankly - but I would still look very carefully for any hidden costs (air travel, health care, extra international fees etc). Finances certainly meant I couldn't apply.

    They are fanatical about 'diversity'. This means they want a mix of geographies, races, even intelligence levels (they admit a lot based on high-level athletic potential without regard to academics - remember the Ivy League is an athletic conference!). This also means that they want applicants to be good at many things - academics, sport, music, leadership, being entrepreneurial, whatever. Solely being intelligent might make you a bit one-dimensional and lacking 'diversity'.

    They don't care as much about aptitude/ motivation for your intended major/ concentration specifically as much as UK universities do.

    You will end up writing a lot of essays on a university-by-university basis vs the UK (one personal statement).

    If you get interviewed, it will not be an intensive subject-specific Oxbridge-style interview.

    Remember that for job prospects in the UK and for academics, Oxbridge is right up there with the top Ivies + MIT and Stanford. So think carefully about why you really want to go to the US.
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    My main reasons to apply for US universities was A finance. Yes, there may be hidden costs, but I cant justify spending 9 grand a year and then having to repay it. Additionally in the UK I would have to take one of my favourite subjects and drop the rest, even if I did apply to join honours degrees.

    I do also like the fact that ivy league universities encourage extra-curricular activities, I myself love performing arts and I would have to probably drop that at Oxbridge because of the demanding workload. I am however going to apply for Cambridge.

    The only thing putting me off at the minute is the fees for taking SAT's. I just did a recent calculation and it would probably cost me £130 just on the required qualifications.
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    (Original post by harrypblack)
    My main reasons to apply for US universities was A finance. Yes, there may be hidden costs, but I cant justify spending 9 grand a year and then having to repay it. Additionally in the UK I would have to take one of my favourite subjects and drop the rest, even if I did apply to join honours degrees.

    I do also like the fact that ivy league universities encourage extra-curricular activities, I myself love performing arts and I would have to probably drop that at Oxbridge because of the demanding workload. I am however going to apply for Cambridge.

    The only thing putting me off at the minute is the fees for taking SAT's. I just did a recent calculation and it would probably cost me £130 just on the required qualifications.
    Would almost certainly cost more in the end, if you factor in travel + accommodation for these tests (I only did SAT I, for a different reason). If finance is your number one reason, I would seriously question applying to university internationally. Flying to and from the US, visa fees, ..., unless you are definitely getting a free ride, I doubt the US is a good 'cheap option'.
    Cambridge too has very generous bursaries, and the richer colleges will add more onto this.

    Also, Idk if you go to a top school with a strong Ivy/ Oxbridge tradition, but you might be jumping the gun a bit in Year 9.
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    (Original post by harrypblack)
    My main reasons to apply for US universities was A finance. Yes, there may be hidden costs, but I cant justify spending 9 grand a year and then having to repay it. Additionally in the UK I would have to take one of my favourite subjects and drop the rest, even if I did apply to join honours degrees.

    I do also like the fact that ivy league universities encourage extra-curricular activities, I myself love performing arts and I would have to probably drop that at Oxbridge because of the demanding workload. I am however going to apply for Cambridge.

    The only thing putting me off at the minute is the fees for taking SAT's. I just did a recent calculation and it would probably cost me £130 just on the required qualifications.
    You can get SAT fee waivers if you're a US citizen living abroad or you are an international student living in the US (not that I'm expecting you to come under either of those - but it's a possibility)


    (Original post by klegend02)
    (they admit a lot based on high-level athletic potential without regard to academics - remember the Ivy League is an athletic conference!)
    Most of what you say is correct but I'd just like to point out the bolded. The athletes they admit cannot fall far below the average because this means their released statistics at the end of the year for SAT percentiles and other figures would fall below rivals. So they admit whilst being very careful to maintain a good level of academic capability, even in athletes.
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    (Original post by harrypblack)
    I have recently been looking at US universities and have found that for my situation they are much more affordable. I also prefer the liberal arts system, meaning that my education will be much broader rather than the UK system of specializing. I most likely want to major in history.

    Can anyone give me a brief outline of the difference in the admissions process, and especially the ones for university's like Harvard or Yale.
    Also apply to a bit less prestigious uni, but with better admission rate. No mater how good you are, applying to Yale and Harvard is like gambling.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    Try to choose a bit less prestigious uni, but with better admission rate. No mater how good you are, applying to Yale and Harvard is like gambling.
    The problem is then admissions is not need blind. I assume OP is looking at this from a financial point of view and as an international, only 5 colleges offer need-blind admissions (HYPM + Amherst)
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    It will be more expensive to go to the US in the long run. 9k is nothing compared to what international students fork out in the States, trust me on this. Unless you're getting a huge scholarship or bursary, the UK will be cheaper.
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    (Original post by Student403)
    The problem is then admissions is not need blind. I assume OP is looking at this from a financial point of view and as an international, only 5 colleges offer need-blind admissions (HYPM + Amherst)
    I see. It's quite the same for PhDs, but the number of schools that offer full studentships to all their students, including internationals, is larger than just the five listed above. In History, the top 20 give a fees+stipend package to their applicants; so you can apply to say Harvard, Yale, Duke, Berkeley and Northwestern to have better chances.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    I see. It's quite the same for PhDs, but the number of schools that offer full studentships to all their students, including internationals, is larger than just the five listed above. In History, the top 20 give a fees+stipend package to their applicants; so you can apply to say Harvard, Yale, Duke, Berkeley and Northwestern to have better chances.
    Oh that's much better than UG. I would definitely say in the US grad admissions is much fairer in terms of rewarding proper academic ability and field experience.
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    (Original post by aymanzayedmannan)
    It will be more expensive to go to the US in the long run. 9k is nothing compared to what international students fork out in the States, trust me on this. Unless you're getting a huge scholarship or bursary, the UK will be cheaper.
    If he's non-EU, he will have to pay £19K a year.

    harrypblack
    Are you a British, or EU student?
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    Me British,
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    (Original post by harrypblack)
    Me British,
    Only a Brit would spell the plural of university with 's on the end! 😀

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