Anyone doing IP Law? Any IP attorneys? Trainees?

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hexagonalRod
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What is it like being an IP attorney? Is it long hours, is the workplace sociable? Secluded? What are the prospects like, how competitive is it, how did you get to where you are? And the packages?
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Queen Cersei
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(Original post by hexagonalRod)
What is it like being an IP attorney? Is it long hours, is the workplace sociable? Secluded? What are the prospects like, how competitive is it, how did you get to where you are? And the packages?
I'm not an IP attorney but I expect it varies between companies.
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hexagonalRod
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(Original post by Queen Cersei)
I not an IP attorney but I expect it varies between companies.
Looks like nobody on TSR is an IP attorney or knows much about the field
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username738914
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(Original post by hexagonalRod)
What is it like being an IP attorney? Is it long hours, is the workplace sociable? Secluded? What are the prospects like, how competitive is it, how did you get to where you are? And the packages?
Could always peruse google to find answers to the first couple of questions, very much doubt you'll come across a boatload of qualified IP lawyers here.

As for salary, most top firms (i.e. large, city firms with IP departments based in London) pay in the £35-50k range for a first year trainee and then £60-75k upon qualification. Ramp up after that depends on the firm, but it's generally a 'lock-step' increase every year.

Regional will be lower, more £23-35k for a first year trainee.

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studos
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are there specific IP training contracts?
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username738914
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(Original post by studos)
are there specific IP training contracts?
For the larger firms, you cycle through 4-6 departments in the training contract. Patent firms are solely focused on patent.

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studos
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I need a list of the employers that get trainees
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Nameless Ghoul
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(Original post by Queen Cersei)
I not an IP attorney but I expect it varies between companies.
Don't be modest.
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Trapz99
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(Original post by Princepieman)
For the larger firms, you cycle through 4-6 departments in the training contract. Patent firms are solely focused on patent.

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I was just checking whether I could give you rep. Turns out I can!
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Trapz99
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(Original post by studos)
I need a list of the employers that get trainees
http://jobs.thelawyer.com/jobs/train...tual-property/
That's the closest I could get to a full list. Is this helpful?
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studos
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(Original post by Trapz99)
http://jobs.thelawyer.com/jobs/train...tual-property/
That's the closest I could get to a full list. Is this helpful?
not quite complete but thanks

I was looking something like chambersstudent for IP
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hexagonalRod
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What are the chances of me getting a Trainee contract if I don't speak French/German?
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username738914
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(Original post by studos)
I need a list of the employers that get trainees
Google is your friend

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hexagonalRod
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(Original post by J-SP)
A lack of additional language skills won't be an issue for a training contract. They can be a benefit to the individual lawyer, but unless you are thinking of applying to a French/German firm, it's not an issue or obstacle in regards to the recruitment process if you don't have either language (or others).


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I see, I can't find any information on how many people from the engineering field try to get training contracts each year for IP firms; do you work or know of the industry by any chance?
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hexagonalRod
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(Original post by J-SP)
I used to recruit for the legal sector.

The number will be fairly small, mainly because you don't have to have a scientific background to be an IP lawyer (although many people with science degrees who go into law have a tendency to go into IP). Plus very few engineers will consider transferring across the law too.


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The firms I have been looking at seem to only recruit science/engineering graduates, in fact they are even specific the fields of science and engineering. It says it here too:
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-prof...atent-attorney

Since you have been in recruitment, what advice do you have for aspiring IP attorneys? What companies are there that I could apply to? Are there any companies that would take me on an internship scheme for the upcoming summer?
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hexagonalRod
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(Original post by J-SP)
You are talking about two different careers and training routes. A training contract is one way, a patent attorney is different a different one. I don't know enough about the latter and have only recruited for the former.


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The website specifies that the entry route to becoming a patent attorney is through a training contract, typically given to science/engineering graduates. Like the following company:
http://www.marks-clerk.com/Home/Abou...x#.Vw622DArKUk

Apologies for the confusion, I am new to this so just a bit curious as to which way is best to enter the field.
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username738914
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(Original post by hexagonalRod)
The website specifies that the entry route to becoming a patent attorney is through a training contract, typically given to science/engineering graduates. Like the following company:
http://www.marks-clerk.com/Home/Abou...x#.Vw622DArKUk

Apologies for the confusion, I am new to this so just a bit curious as to which way is best to enter the field.
This explains it quite well:
http://www.kilburnstrode.com/about-u...reer-programme

Seems like a 4-6 year commitment to become fully qualified, and you apply to start as a grad. Looks like it mixes experience with exams weaved in.

Very different to the GDL + LPC + 2 year rotational training contract to become an IP solicitor.

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hexagonalRod
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(Original post by Princepieman)
This explains it quite well:
http://www.kilburnstrode.com/about-u...reer-programme

Seems like a 4-6 year commitment to become fully qualified, and you apply to start as a grad. Looks like it mixes experience with exams weaved in.

Very different to the GDL + LPC + 2 year rotational training contract to become an IP solicitor.

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So you reckon GDL + LPC is a quicker route?

It seems like you need pass the IP exams either way, perhaps there's no need for me to undertake a GDL course.
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username738914
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(Original post by hexagonalRod)
So you reckon GDL + LPC is a quicker route?

It seems like you need pass the IP exams either way, perhaps there's no need for me to undertake a GDL course.
For the GDL + LPC route, the only exams you'd take are within those two years. After that, it's a matter of going through your rotations around the firm's various departments. In terms of the shortest, it would be the Solicitor path, the patent attorney path looks like a great path for those who really want to work in patents but the commitment to become qualified is quite long.

Neither is easy mind.
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hexagonalRod
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(Original post by Princepieman)
For the GDL + LPC route, the only exams you'd take are within those two years. After that, it's a matter of going through your rotations around the firm's various departments. In terms of the shortest, it would be the Solicitor path, the patent attorney path looks like a great path for those who really want to work in patents but the commitment to become qualified is quite long.

Neither is easy mind.
Don't you have to take the EQE exam either way?
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