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Kidney

What is a basal channel? Apparently it's found in the proximal convoluted tubule and it helps with selective re-absorption of glomeruler filtrate. How does it help?
Original post by Banana ice-cream
What is a basal channel? Apparently it's found in the proximal convoluted tubule and it helps with selective re-absorption of glomeruler filtrate. How does it help?


A basal channel is any channel in the basolateral membrane, for example the K+ channel which helps to prevent K+ buildup in the cell due to the Na+/K+-ATPase. They're found throughout the kidney but the PCT does a lot of the reabsorption so there will be lots of basal channels. It will help with making concentration gradients and you can reabsorb certain things depending on what concentration gradients you have
Original post by Gaiaphage
A basal channel is any channel in the basolateral membrane, for example the K+ channel which helps to prevent K+ buildup in the cell due to the Na+/K+-ATPase. They're found throughout the kidney but the PCT does a lot of the reabsorption so there will be lots of basal channels. It will help with making concentration gradients and you can reabsorb certain things depending on what concentration gradients you have


Thanx. What's the basolateral membrane? So it's basically an ion pump? Or does it just help with facilitated diffusion?
Original post by Banana ice-cream
Thanx. What's the basolateral membrane? So it's basically an ion pump? Or does it just help with facilitated diffusion?


Ah sorry, I didn't see that this was A level. The renal tubule (where the filtrate from the Bowman's capsule goes) is separated from the interstitial fluid of the kidney by a layer of cells, and there are different channels on each side. The side of the cell that's in contact with the tubule is called the tubular membrane, and the side of the cell that's in contact with the interstitial fluid is called the basolateral membrane. So channels on the basolateral membrane will move things from the cell into the interstitium and vice versa, which is effectively back into the bloodstream.

Technically, channels and ion pumps are different (channels are passive, pumps are active) so yes it just helps with facilitated diffusion.

I'm a first year medic with exams coming up soon and I'm currently revising the kidney which is where I got all this from, you won't need to know it for A level! But hopefully it'll help you understand it which is always helpful
Reply 4
bro are you a doctor now omg!

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