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    Well, the title states it all, really. Is it something worth something investing my time in?

    If you're wondering, I'm going to be studying Law at universiy. I'm looking to find/get into something that will satisfy my hunger for something thought stimulating.
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    I can't even imagine the avenues it could open for you if you get good at it

    so yeah, if you have the time to devote to it, it could be very beneficial
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    (Original post by null.and.void.)
    Well, the title states it all, really. Is it something worth something investing my time in?If you're wondering, I'm going to be studying Law at universiy. I'm looking to find/get into something that will satisfy my hunger for something thought stimulating.
    It's a useful skill to have. You could make apps or websites in your free time and have the £££ rolling in. You could probably find some applications relevant to law too. Look into IBM Watson's analytics APIs, there's a lot of (fairly) easy to use tools that you can use for analysing documents, language and so on. I'd imagine that could be useful as a lawyer. Even stuff like developing web crawlers that could go through Wikipedia, law databases and stuff to find relevant information. Anything involving looking through lots of data, decent programming skills will help with.

    It can also be fun!
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    Well, I got a summer research project after my penultimate year at university with it. On the back of that, I got my final year dissertation topic/supervisor agreed. From that, I got my PhD topic/supervisor. I'd call that pretty useful.
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    Absolutely. In terms of skills you can pick up that have, and will, become increasingly more valuable. This is the one.

    And if you you become really good at it... $$$
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    That's a highly sought after skill. If you were good, your employability would be very healthy and you could even go freelance in the future if you wish.
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    (Original post by null.and.void.)
    Well, the title states it all, really. Is it something worth something investing my time in?
    I would say so, yes. It is a fun hobby, you can build your own web stuff, plus is can enhance career prospects.

    Big data software techniques are also coming to the legal industry, e.g. mining through case history using software to save the grunt work.
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    If £50K+ sounds good to you then go for it. But you had better have a passion for it, and even better, you need to be good... very good at what you do. You can also do your own projects on the side in your spare time... if you get any spare time that is!

    I think at 23 or 24 I reached £35K (senior level in practice, but not in official title name - doesn't matter anyway, only thing that matters is your experience and how good you are), plus it's something I genuinely love doing. Been a developer for at least several years now and I'm aiming towards a lead developer position.

    Computer science is everywhere, in every profession, in every industry - it's practically taken over the modern world.
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    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    Computer science is everywhere, in every profession, in every industry - it's practically taken over the modern world.
    As leading tech venture capitalist Marc Andressen likes to say, software is eating the world. If you are a good coder, your employment prospects are bright.
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    If you can code properly, you'll never be out of a job
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    (Original post by null.and.void.)
    Well, the title states it all, really. Is it something worth something investing my time in?

    If you're wondering, I'm going to be studying Law at universiy. I'm looking to find/get into something that will satisfy my hunger for something thought stimulating.
    I study law atm and was thinking about picking up coding in my free time. Cool to think there are others that are thinking the same haha
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    (Original post by Andy98)
    If you can code properly, you'll never be out of a job
    (Original post by dabbler)
    As leading tech venture capitalist Marc Andressen likes to say, software is eating the world. If you are a good coder, your employment prospects are bright.
    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    If £50K+ sounds good to you then go for it. But you had better have a passion for it, and even better, you need to be good... very good at what you do. You can also do your own projects on the side in your spare time... if you get any spare time that is!

    I think at 23 or 24 I reached £35K (senior level in practice, but not in official title name - doesn't matter anyway, only thing that matters is your experience and how good you are), plus it's something I genuinely love doing. Been a developer for at least several years now and I'm aiming towards a lead developer position.

    Computer science is everywhere, in every profession, in every industry - it's practically taken over the modern world.
    (Original post by Ed Phelan)
    That's a highly sought after skill. If you were good, your employability would be very healthy and you could even go freelance in the future if you wish.
    (Original post by BlueSam3)
    Well, I got a summer research project after my penultimate year at university with it. On the back of that, I got my final year dissertation topic/supervisor agreed. From that, I got my PhD topic/supervisor. I'd call that pretty useful.
    (Original post by JordanL_)
    It's a useful skill to have. You could make apps or websites in your free time and have the £££ rolling in. You could probably find some applications relevant to law too. Look into IBM Watson's analytics APIs, there's a lot of (fairly) easy to use tools that you can use for analysing documents, language and so on. I'd imagine that could be useful as a lawyer. Even stuff like developing web crawlers that could go through Wikipedia, law databases and stuff to find relevant information. Anything involving looking through lots of data, decent programming skills will help with.

    It can also be fun!
    How do you suggest I indulge myself into this seemingly sought after skill?
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    Depends. i'd have picked cooking and making sure I was good enough on my degree.
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    (Original post by null.and.void.)
    How do you suggest I indulge myself into this seemingly sought after skill?
    www.codecademy.com is always a good place to start.
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    These learn how to code resources should help you out if you want to get started with coding.
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    The New Boston is a great resource if you like following videos.
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    If you're only doing it because it's beneficial, then it's not a hobby


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    (Original post by Asklepios)
    If you're only doing it because it's beneficial, then it's not a hobby


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    I'd rather invest my time in doing something beneficial than kicking around a ball.
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    (Original post by null.and.void.)
    How do you suggest I indulge myself into this seemingly sought after skill?
    https://www.edx.org/course/introduct...harvardx-cs50x

    Probably the best introduction you can get. A lot of people are recommending Codecademy but I'd advise against that. You'll learn the languages but you won't really learn how to use them or how they work, which can be quite important.
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    (Original post by null.and.void.)
    How do you suggest I indulge myself into this seemingly sought after skill?
    Make a thing. Pick something, make it. Games are a reasonable start once you've got the basics down: you usually end up wanting most of the major data structures, and I'm sure you can come up with a million ideas for them. Just google stuff if there isn't something that you don't know how to do / you think "hmm, there must be a better way to do this" (because there always is, and someone will have explained it on stackexchange at some point). Once you've got a vague idea of what you're doing, enter Ludlum Dare to give yourself some actual deadlines to work to.
 
 
 
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