Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    I'm pretty rubbish at English and want to get a B so I can do history at A level (not too sure why I need a B for A level history but okay).
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Prepare thoroughly beforehand
    Always use quotes
    Etc
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    AIGHT *cracks knuckles*

    1) If your exam offers the liberty of only requiring you to use one book to answer the questions on your paper, pick the one you've enjoyed the most in class for it.


    2) Thoroughly go through said book for quotes. Put these into a table that looks a bit like:

    Name:  sow.JPG
Views: 98
Size:  30.7 KB

    It's also important to note that quotes don't necessarily have to be run-on sentences. They can also consist of single words that are constantly mentioned/reference a specific theme.


    3) In regards to actual analysis, try to keep the question: "How and why?" instead of "What?"running through your mind during the exam. The examiner is asking you to validate your thesis statement by proving it correct with evidence and explanations.

    E.g. "In Sound of Waves, Shinji is often portrayed as the hero" is rubbish.

    "In Sound of Waves, Mishima uses lexis associated with nature, such as [quotes here], to describe the character of Shinji. As a result, the reader is clearly able to see that as a result of his own connection with nature, Shinji is clearly placed on a moral high-ground that ....." is a lot better.


    4) Once you've sorted out your quotes, write them onto flashcards and go through them whenever you feel bored and/or need a break from really taxing revision.


    5) Timed practices. Do these constantly when you become more confident in your ability to recite quotes off by heart. Half the battle in an exam, after all, is writing quick enough; ensuring that you'll be able to coherently structure your analysis into an answer under pressure is very important. You'll also probably feel less nervous on the day as a result of this, too


    6) Plan you answers before you start writing. My Lit exam last year was 1h 45min in length, so I spent 10 minutes analysing the extract given to us for question one, and another 10 to plan out my answers to both question one and two. It helps you figure out a direction for your essays and, as a result, you may be less inclined to waffle on about nonsense.

    I hope this helps!

    Spoiler:
    Show
    I got an A
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Sparknotes is your friend. Have a look through the website alongside your other lit revision for bits of analysis/themes/etc from your books you might not necessarily have picked up on yourself (but remember it's about how you apply the info to the question, rather than just spouting random analysis). Otherwise, LeFeuilly's pretty much covered everything

    I figure they want you to have the english grade because of the essay-style questions you do for A level history, but I'll admit that it's not a condition I've come across before.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AxSirlotl)
    I'm pretty rubbish at English and want to get a B so I can do history at A level (not too sure why I need a B for A level history but okay).
    Which books/poems are you studying?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LeFeuilly)
    AIGHT *cracks knuckles*

    1) If your exam offers the liberty of only requiring you to use one book to answer the questions on your paper, pick the one you've enjoyed the most in class for it.


    2) Thoroughly go through said book for quotes. Put these into a table that looks a bit like:

    Name:  sow.JPG
Views: 98
Size:  30.7 KB

    It's also important to note that quotes don't necessarily have to be run-on sentences. They can also consist of single words that are constantly mentioned/reference a specific theme.


    3) In regards to actual analysis, try to keep the question: "How and why?" instead of "What?"running through your mind during the exam. The examiner is asking you to validate your thesis statement by proving it correct with evidence and explanations.

    E.g. "In Sound of Waves, Shinji is often portrayed as the hero" is rubbish.

    "In Sound of Waves, Mishima uses lexis associated with nature, such as [quotes here], to describe the character of Shinji. As a result, the reader is clearly able to see that as a result of his own connection with nature, Shinji is clearly placed on a moral high-ground that ....." is a lot better.


    4) Once you've sorted out your quotes, write them onto flashcards and go through them whenever you feel bored and/or need a break from really taxing revision.


    5) Timed practices. Do these constantly when you become more confident in your ability to recite quotes off by heart. Half the battle in an exam, after all, is writing quick enough; ensuring that you'll be able to coherently structure your analysis into an answer under pressure is very important. You'll also probably feel less nervous on the day as a result of this, too


    6) Plan you answers before you start writing. My Lit exam last year was 1h 45min in length, so I spent 10 minutes analysing the extract given to us for question one, and another 10 to plan out my answers to both question one and two. It helps you figure out a direction for your essays and, as a result, you may be less inclined to waffle on about nonsense.

    I hope this helps!
    Spoiler:
    Show
    I got an A
    Wow thanks! I will sure use what you've just told me and well done on that A!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by luciie)
    Which books/poems are you studying?
    Of Mice and Men and An Inspector Calls. Then character and voice poems.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AxSirlotl)
    Wow thanks! I will sure use what you've just told me and well done on that A!
    Thank you!! And I completely forgot to put this in my post, but good luck :P
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AxSirlotl)
    Of Mice and Men and An Inspector Calls. Then character and voice poems.
    These might help you for OMAM:

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...&nohtml5=False
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...&nohtml5=False

    Do you have to do unseen poetry too?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lightwoXd)
    Sparknotes is your friend. Have a look through the website alongside your other lit revision for bits of analysis/themes/etc from your books you might not necessarily have picked up on yourself (but remember it's about how you apply the info to the question, rather than just spouting random analysis). Otherwise, LeFeuilly's pretty much covered everything

    I figure they want you to have the english grade because of the essay-style questions you do for A level history, but I'll admit that it's not a condition I've come across before.
    Is sparknotes free or do you have to pay/seasonal price?I remember a few months ago i went on the website but they only showed half of the essay and asked for me to pay the rest(idk if that was sparknotes)
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Blancosdos)
    Is sparknotes free or do you have to pay/seasonal price?I remember a few months ago i went on the website but they only showed half of the essay and asked for me to pay the rest(idk if that was sparknotes)
    As far as I'm aware it's free. That said I've never tried looking at sample essays on it, I've only ever looked at the character analysis/plot summary/themes/etc bits. We could both have been on the same site - honestly wouldn't know (it's been a good 3 years since I last used it, so things have probably changed since then) :dontknow:
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
    Useful resources

    Study tools

    Rosette

    Essay expert

    Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

    Thinking about uni already?

    Thinking about uni already?

    See where you can apply with our uni match tool

    Student chat

    Ask a question

    Chat to other GCSE students and get your study questions answered.

    Creating

    Make study resources

    Create all the resources you need to get the grades.

    Planner

    Create your own Study Plan

    Organise all your homework and exams so you never miss another deadline.

    Resources by subject

    From flashcards to mind maps; there's everything you need for all of your GCSE subjects.

    Papers

    Find past papers

    100s of GCSE past papers for all your subjects at your fingertips.

    Help out other students

    Can you help? Study help unanswered threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.