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Dyspraxia without problems learning to ride a bike?? watch

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    Is this possible? According to my grandad I didn't have trouble learning to ride a bike, and problems with learning to ride a bike seems to be one of the main signs of dyspraxia... I know no one can diagnose me over the internet, but I want to know whether pursuing a diagnosis is a waste of time? I've suspected for years that I have it. Not severe dyspraxia, but bad enough dyspraxia to cause me suffering.

    For any TL;DRers who want to tell me to go to to my GP, I've done that before. She knows what dyspraxia is but I don't think she knows anything about it. I was like 'do you know what dyspraxia is?' and she was like 'it affects coordination?' Well, yeah, but a bit more in-depth knowledge might help, and seeing another GP would take forever as it takes about 3 weeks to get an appointment at my surgery. And I'm currently seeing an autism and neurodevelopmental disorder service for an autism assessment, but the psychologist I've seen seems to think ADHD is more likely than dyspraxia, and I can't use up appointment time talking about dyspraxia because I need a decision soon about whether I'm autistic so I can tell Student Finance and the uni I want to go to and stuff.

    This is gonna be a bit of a run-on disorganised post because I have other stuff I should be doing and I don't want to take too long making it tidy. Apologies in advice for any incoherencies. I'll separate stuff into bullets so it's a bit more readable.

    *It took longer than normal for me to learn to walk, be potty-trained, tie my shoelaces, differentiate left from right and tell the time.
    *I was appalling at sports and P.E. at school, although I'm a girl so I think that possibly caused me less problems than it could have done.
    *I can't wink properly (and only in one eye can I partially wink... I'm 20 years old btw) nor click my fingers properly
    *I can't whistle or blow balloons at all.
    *I never learned how to skip with a rope or do handstands or headstands
    *I am never going to try to learn to drive because I think it would be a waste of everyone's time.
    *I can't read maps or follow directions (unless they consist of like two steps lol) and I don't know the difference between east and west.
    *I have executive function issues, although I'm not sure to what extent they're caused by mental health issues... I am very disorganised and forgetful. My short-term and working memory are particularly bad. I will often turn on the kettle to make a drink and then forget I did it.
    *I'm always struggling with everyday practical stuff, e.g. on Wednesday I was unable to close a taxi door... the driver had to close it for me.
    *My social skills aren't great. I have no friends at college and everyone thinks I'm weird. I don't actually have any friends who live in my city who I ever see
    *I won't go on. Lmao

    In spite of all of this, my verbal IQ is above average, or at least it was when I was 13 and I had my IQ tested. I don't want to describe myself as intelligent because there'll always be people who will say I'm obnoxious for doing so, and I'm not particularly keen on the concept of a general 'intelligence' tbh. But I'd definitely say that the issues I have aren't what would be normally expected from someone with my level of intellectual functioning.

    ???
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    (Original post by disandsexstudy)
    Is this possible? According to my grandad I didn't have trouble learning to ride a bike, and problems with learning to ride a bike seems to be one of the main signs of dyspraxia... I know no one can diagnose me over the internet, but I want to know whether pursuing a diagnosis is a waste of time? I've suspected for years that I have it. Not severe dyspraxia, but bad enough dyspraxia to cause me suffering.

    For any TL;DRers who want to tell me to go to to my GP, I've done that before. She knows what dyspraxia is but I don't think she knows anything about it. I was like 'do you know what dyspraxia is?' and she was like 'it affects coordination?' Well, yeah, but a bit more in-depth knowledge might help, and seeing another GP would take forever as it takes about 3 weeks to get an appointment at my surgery. And I'm currently seeing an autism and neurodevelopmental disorder service for an autism assessment, but the psychologist I've seen seems to think ADHD is more likely than dyspraxia, and I can't use up appointment time talking about dyspraxia because I need a decision soon about whether I'm autistic so I can tell Student Finance and the uni I want to go to and stuff.

    This is gonna be a bit of a run-on disorganised post because I have other stuff I should be doing and I don't want to take too long making it tidy. Apologies in advice for any incoherencies. I'll separate stuff into bullets so it's a bit more readable.

    *It took longer than normal for me to learn to walk, be potty-trained, tie my shoelaces, differentiate left from right and tell the time.
    *I was appalling at sports and P.E. at school, although I'm a girl so I think that possibly caused me less problems than it could have done.
    *I can't wink properly (and only in one eye can I partially wink... I'm 20 years old btw) nor click my fingers properly
    *I can't whistle or blow balloons at all.
    *I never learned how to skip with a rope or do handstands or headstands
    *I am never going to try to learn to drive because I think it would be a waste of everyone's time.
    *I can't read maps or follow directions (unless they consist of like two steps lol) and I don't know the difference between east and west.
    *I have executive function issues, although I'm not sure to what extent they're caused by mental health issues... I am very disorganised and forgetful. My short-term and working memory are particularly bad. I will often turn on the kettle to make a drink and then forget I did it.
    *I'm always struggling with everyday practical stuff, e.g. on Wednesday I was unable to close a taxi door... the driver had to close it for me.
    *My social skills aren't great. I have no friends at college and everyone thinks I'm weird. I don't actually have any friends who live in my city who I ever see
    *I won't go on. Lmao

    In spite of all of this, my verbal IQ is above average, or at least it was when I was 13 and I had my IQ tested. I don't want to describe myself as intelligent because there'll always be people who will say I'm obnoxious for doing so, and I'm not particularly keen on the concept of a general 'intelligence' tbh. But I'd definitely say that the issues I have aren't what would be normally expected from someone with my level of intellectual functioning.

    ???
    Hey,
    I got diagnosed with dyspraxia when I was 10 through the NHS but as far as I m aware as an adult it is hard or near impossible to get funding for it. I could kind of ride a bike from when i was 9 but thats not the only marker for it and there are many "types" of it I suppose. Apart from the social skills, everything you have listed is the same as the symptoms I have so perusing a diagnosis is worth it. Techincally occupational therapists are the only people who can give full diagnosis of dyspraxia, now as an adult seeing one privately would make you more likely to get a diagnosis. An ed psych did write on my report that I show symptoms of it but ed psych assessments only cover mental symptoms, like 3d puzzles problems and things.

    So long story short, If you want a dyspraxia diagnosis you should probably go private. It tooks months to see anyone as a child so like I said i wouldnt get your hopes up about seeing anyone on the nhs as an adult. And yeah, having a large discrepancy in verbal iq to other iq's can be a marker of various learning differences (my verbal one is in the 89th percentile and most of the others are like 20th:P)

    Hope this helps
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    (Original post by claireestelle)
    Hey,
    I got diagnosed with dyspraxia when I was 10 through the NHS but as far as I m aware as an adult it is hard or near impossible to get funding for it. I could kind of ride a bike from when i was 9 but thats not the only marker for it and there are many "types" of it I suppose. Apart from the social skills, everything you have listed is the same as the symptoms I have so perusing a diagnosis is worth it. Techincally occupational therapists are the only people who can give full diagnosis of dyspraxia, now as an adult seeing one privately would make you more likely to get a diagnosis. An ed psych did write on my report that I show symptoms of it but ed psych assessments only cover mental symptoms, like 3d puzzles problems and things.

    So long story short, If you want a dyspraxia diagnosis you should probably go private. It tooks months to see anyone as a child so like I said i wouldnt get your hopes up about seeing anyone on the nhs as an adult. And yeah, having a large discrepancy in verbal iq to other iq's can be a marker of various learning differences (my verbal one is in the 89th percentile and most of the others are like 20th:P)

    Hope this helps
    Well I'm 20 and getting assessed through the NHS for ADHD? So why not dyspraxia? Or is dyspraxia less funded? I suppose seeing an occ therapist is more specialised than filling in questionnaires with a psychologist at the autism clinic...
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    (Original post by disandsexstudy)
    Well I'm 20 and getting assessed through the NHS for ADHD? So why not dyspraxia? Or is dyspraxia less funded? I suppose seeing an occ therapist is more specialised than filling in questionnaires with a psychologist at the autism clinic...
    Ooh btw I just checked and the service I see has an occ therapist unless things have changed
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    (Original post by disandsexstudy)
    Well I'm 20 and getting assessed through the NHS for ADHD? So why not dyspraxia? Or is dyspraxia less funded? I suppose seeing an occ therapist is more specialised than filling in questionnaires with a psychologist at the autism clinic...
    It will depend on area funding to be honest, i ve read of many places online refusing assessments after primary school age and any adult i ve heard of with a diagnosis have always had to go private. Yeah, it is more specialized a full dyspraxia assessment, i believe it'd be 3-4 hours long as an adult.

    And i guess the thing the difference is that you can technically treat ADHD with medication so a diagnosis is beneficial from that respect, dyspraxia although you can get physio and OT help, it's unlikely you'd get much help from the nhs after diagnosis, if any at all.

    As far as uni goes, having a dyspraxia diagnosis could get you a scribe and pc use but otherwise wont get you extra support if you already had ADHD and autism. If that makes sense?

    But yes if you can get a diagnosis, get one even just for the sake of knowing yourself better.
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    (Original post by disandsexstudy)
    Ooh btw I just checked and the service I see has an occ therapist unless things have changed
    Now that does sound like really good news
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    I have Asperger's and have been told it is highly likely I have dyspraxia. Most of my paternal relatives have it and there is a joke in the family as none of us can figure out left and right easily. As I am over 18 my GP refused to pay for the assessment and I do not have the money to go private.
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    (Original post by benion)
    I have Asperger's and have been told it is highly likely I have dyspraxia. Most of my paternal relatives have it and there is a joke in the family as none of us can figure out left and right easily. As I am over 18 my GP refused to pay for the assessment and I do not have the money to go private.
    Are you in education or employment at the moment? In higher education they can help a bit towards costs and supposedly a job centre could refer you to an assessment.
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    I am a self employed maths and science tutor but hoping to start an MPhys next year so may get some support then.
    The NHS sucks. I was misdiagnosed as bipolar for 10 years by the NHS. I told them I thought I had Asperger's and had been misdiagnosed but the thickhead psychiatrist labelled this a "delusion". I went private, got a full assessment, and turns out I was right and they were wrong.
    I was supposed to see psych lifelong but got discharged in 2013 due to NHS cutbacks and now get zero support.
    Supposed to see GP next week, but they know jack about Asperger's and I end up having to explain it to them.
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    (Original post by benion)
    I am a self employed maths and science tutor but hoping to start an MPhys next year so may get some support then.
    The NHS sucks. I was misdiagnosed as bipolar for 10 years by the NHS. I told them I thought I had Asperger's and had been misdiagnosed but the thickhead psychiatrist labelled this a "delusion". I went private, got a full assessment, and turns out I was right and they were wrong.
    I was supposed to see psych lifelong but got discharged in 2013 due to NHS cutbacks and now get zero support.
    Supposed to see GP next week, but they know jack about Asperger's and I end up having to explain it to them.
    Is the MPhys at a brick university? It's likely you could get an ed psych assessment through your university which would be hell of a lot quicker than going through the NHS. It could maybe cost £100-200 through a uni but no more than that as they can usually subside it. Also postgrads are eligible for DSA You should get a new gp :P
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    (Original post by disandsexstudy)
    *It took longer than normal for me to learn to walk, be potty-trained, tie my shoelaces, differentiate left from right and tell the time.
    *I was appalling at sports and P.E. at school, although I'm a girl so I think that possibly caused me less problems than it could have done.
    *I can't wink properly (and only in one eye can I partially wink... I'm 20 years old btw) nor click my fingers properly
    *I can't whistle or blow balloons at all.
    *I never learned how to skip with a rope or do handstands or headstands
    *I am never going to try to learn to drive because I think it would be a waste of everyone's time.
    *I can't read maps or follow directions (unless they consist of like two steps lol) and I don't know the difference between east and west.
    *I have executive function issues, although I'm not sure to what extent they're caused by mental health issues... I am very disorganised and forgetful. My short-term and working memory are particularly bad. I will often turn on the kettle to make a drink and then forget I did it.
    *I'm always struggling with everyday practical stuff, e.g. on Wednesday I was unable to close a taxi door... the driver had to close it for me.
    *My social skills aren't great. I have no friends at college and everyone thinks I'm weird. I don't actually have any friends who live in my city who I ever see
    *I won't go on. Lmao
    Guy here and I share all the traits that I've bolded in the quote. Although I think I'm improving with the last bit. Or maybe it's because I only see people that I "hit off with" rather than anyone?
    Honestly some of what you've mentioned are so trivial that it doesn't matter if you can't do them.
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    (Original post by shawn_o1)
    Guy here and I share all the traits that I've bolded in the quote. Although I think I'm improving with the last bit. Or maybe it's because I only see people that I "hit off with" rather than anyone?
    Honestly some of what you've mentioned are so trivial that it doesn't matter if you can't do them.
    I mean yeah, as an adult it doesn't really matter whether I can wink or do handstands lmao, but they're things involving motor skills that I noticed as a child that made me different from other girls, which is why I mentioned them. Teachers really liked the game 'wink murder' so that was awkward at school... I think as an adult in a way it's easier to have dyspraxic traits as you can avoid doing certain stuff - e.g. no one's forcing you to play rounders now. But also harder because life is more demanding in ways and people can't shrug off your deficits by attributing them to you being a kid...

    Are you dyspraxic btw?
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    (Original post by disandsexstudy)
    I mean yeah, as an adult it doesn't really matter whether I can wink or do handstands lmao, but they're things involving motor skills that I noticed as a child that made me different from other girls, which is why I mentioned them. Teachers really liked the game 'wink murder' so that was awkward at school... I think as an adult in a way it's easier to have dyspraxic traits as you can avoid doing certain stuff - e.g. no one's forcing you to play rounders now. But also harder because life is more demanding in ways and people can't shrug off your deficits by attributing them to you being a kid...
    You hit the nail on the head there.
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    (Original post by claireestelle)
    You hit the nail on the head there.
    With what?
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    (Original post by disandsexstudy)
    With what?
    With what you said about certain things don't matter anymore once you've left school, like no one cares that i can't play sports anymore but also somethings get harder to ignore as an adult like the fact i might not ever get me driving license.
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    (Original post by claireestelle)
    Is the MPhys at a brick university? It's likely you could get an ed psych assessment through your university which would be hell of a lot quicker than going through the NHS. It could maybe cost £100-200 through a uni but no more than that as they can usually subside it. Also postgrads are eligible for DSA You should get a new gp :P
    I want to do physics with theoretical physics at Manchester or perhaps Oxford. I will probably go for Manchester as I live there now and am a single mum. My son's dad cannot drive through disability so if I move it will make access more or less impossible for him and he has the right to be in our son's life.

    I worked as a medical doctor for 7 years but got sacked in a disability discrimination lawsuit which I won. I could go back to medicine but I struggle interacting with patients and I do not like being around emotional people as it scares me. In medicine a lot of patients and relatives are emotional because the patient is unwell and it upsets the family.

    I did not want to be a doctor in the first place and was pushed into it by horrible pushy parents who said if I dropped out of uni they would never speak to me again. When I did my 3rd year at Cambridge I came top in neuroscience and was offered a PhD but my mum went ape and would not let me do this as it would "bring shame on the family". Not sure why, it is not like I wanted to be a criminal, just think she was a cow.

    I have done and published research in neuroscience but find it dull as it is too easy and if something is easy I get bored with it pretty quickly.
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    (Original post by benion)
    I want to do physics with theoretical physics at Manchester or perhaps Oxford. I will probably go for Manchester as I live there now and am a single mum. My son's dad cannot drive through disability so if I move it will make access more or less impossible for him and he has the right to be in our son's life.

    I worked as a medical doctor for 7 years but got sacked in a disability discrimination lawsuit which I won. I could go back to medicine but I struggle interacting with patients and I do not like being around emotional people as it scares me. In medicine a lot of patients and relatives are emotional because the patient is unwell and it upsets the family.

    I did not want to be a doctor in the first place and was pushed into it by horrible pushy parents who said if I dropped out of uni they would never speak to me again. When I did my 3rd year at Cambridge I came top in neuroscience and was offered a PhD but my mum went ape and would not let me do this as it would "bring shame on the family". Not sure why, it is not like I wanted to be a criminal, just think she was a cow.

    I have done and published research in neuroscience but find it dull as it is too easy and if something is easy I get bored with it pretty quickly.
    Yeah your parents sound absolutely unsupportive. Sounds like trying physics is a good idea
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    (Original post by claireestelle)
    Yeah your parents sound absolutely unsupportive. Sounds like trying physics is a good idea
    It is just annoying. When I was at Churchill there was this guy who always sat in the library reading about string theory and I was really jealous as that is way more interesting than learning the names of muscles. My mum was adamant that I was not allowed to switch courses.

    Even though I came top of the uni in most exams I went on to be a crap doctor as my Asperger's makes me a bit useless at speaking to patients and doctors need strong interpersonal skills which I do not have.
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    (Original post by benion)
    It is just annoying. When I was at Churchill there was this guy who always sat in the library reading about string theory and I was really jealous as that is way more interesting than learning the names of muscles. My mum was adamant that I was not allowed to switch courses.

    Even though I came top of the uni in most exams I went on to be a crap doctor as my Asperger's makes me a bit useless at speaking to patients and doctors need strong interpersonal skills which I do not have.
    My best friend does Physics at Churchill. Sorry if irrelevant aha. Churchill doesn't get mentioned much.
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    (Original post by disandsexstudy)
    My best friend does Physics at Churchill. Sorry if irrelevant aha. Churchill doesn't get mentioned much.
    I liked Churchill as it is less formal than the other colleges.
 
 
 
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