Article: Five revision myths demolished

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shooks
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Many stories fly around schools and colleges during the exam period; tall tales of super-powered students, impossible questions and evil examiners. Each of them complete cobblers.

Here Mr Langley, TSR’s resident teacher, tackles some of the most dangerous exam and revision myths.

Read the full article on five revision myths demolished here
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thefatone
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does one really need a timetable? is it absolutely necessary to get some revision done? i wouldn't say so
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Inazuma
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I feel like the word "dangerous" is being mis-used...
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The Learn Ranger
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Maybe not dangerous like, say, swimming with sharks or jumping out of a plane, but these myths might get you thinking about exams and revision in ways that aren't very productive - so dangerous in so far as they can create extra pressure, negative thinking and study habits that aren't the most helpful.

But I take the point - the word 'dangerous' might overstate the case!
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OrionMusicNet
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I don't think you really have to have a timetable to do work. In fact, some people spend so long making these fancy timetables that they fool themselves into thinking they have done work, even if they don't actually follow it when the time comes.
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The Learn Ranger
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(Original post by OrionMusicNet)
I don't think you really have to have a timetable to do work. In fact, some people spend so long making these fancy timetables that they fool themselves into thinking they have done work, even if they don't actually follow it when the time comes.
You're right - it can get a bit over the top but you have to be very confident and very well organised, with a clear view of what needs to be done to get by successfully without at least an outline plan I think.
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nisha.sri
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So if someone works really hard , they would get amazing grades
and if someone doesn't work hard, they would terrible grades
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ckfeister
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(Original post by thefatone)
does one really need a timetable? is it absolutely necessary to get some revision done? i wouldn't say so
Yes its needed... this article basically sums up what I think about 12A* braggers
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ckfeister
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(Original post by OrionMusicNet)
I don't think you really have to have a timetable to do work. In fact, some people spend so long making these fancy timetables that they fool themselves into thinking they have done work, even if they don't actually follow it when the time comes.
I did a timetable and its all working.
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M14B
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(Original post by thefatone)
does one really need a timetable? is it absolutely necessary to get some revision done? i wouldn't say so
I agree with article on that
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thefatone
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(Original post by ckfeister)
Yes its needed... this article basically sums up what I think about 12A* braggers
well not everyone's the same
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ckfeister
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(Original post by thefatone)
well not everyone's the same
You mean the private school kids or the grammar school kids because they had an outstanding KS3/4 education?
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elen90
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Timetable's often don't work for me because I set myself unrealistic targets (yeah, sure, I'm going to do three hours' revision the moment I get home from school). That can often leaving you feel demotivated when you don't stick within the timetable, not only because it's easy to underestimate how long it will take you to do something.

I expected a spider diagram to take me one hour yesterday. It took three.

I find that simple to-do lists work better. Ones that don't have time constraints - just stuff you know needs to get done, whether you complete it all within three hours or ten. Other people may feel differently, but it isn't even the end of the world if something doesn't get checked off. Just move it to the next day. This is why it's best to do the longwinded objectives first. Isn't a huge drag on your next day's revision just to complete that sheet of questions the teacher set.

People often forget that it isn't the amount of time you spend revising that matters, but what you actually learn. And timetables are a great way for notorious procrastinators like me to waste time.
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elen90
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Timetables* (pesky editor won't let me change it...)
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bulgylau
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I feel even more scared after reading that...:getmecoat:
*bins highlighters and cries in a corner trying to make a revision timetable*
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Plagioclase
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This is good advice. Although I do agree with elen90's point on timetables.
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username2176541
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I have never used a timetable and I just revise topics I think i need practising thats where common sense comes in. If I had alot to do then I would need to get organised but atm I don't need to and I still get 100% in exams.
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OrionMusicNet
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(Original post by ckfeister)
I did a timetable and its all working.
I wasn't saying that having a timetable won't help (it can definitely help a great deal), my point was that it isn't necessarily needed and some people misuse them.
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OrionMusicNet
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(Original post by The Learn Ranger)
You're right - it can get a bit over the top but you have to be very confident and very well organised, with a clear view of what needs to be done to get by successfully without at least an outline plan I think.
Yeah, you do at least need to have some sort of mental outline, my point was just that some people end up abusing the timetable concept and just end up using it as another tool to procrastinate. Plenty of people use them properly of course though.
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indistinct
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(Original post by ckfeister)
You mean the private school kids or the grammar school kids because they had an outstanding KS3/4 education?
I think you need to grow up and stop acting as if they have it any easier than us, they have to work to get the grades just as much as you or I. I'm not a person who is from a privileged background, but i am working for 12 A*'s, and I'm not using a timetable. You should be focusing on your revision if you lack "an outstanding KS3/4 education"; I am and its working.
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