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    Hello TSR

    As the title states...what has caused computer science graduates to have the highest rate of employment? I understand these reports should be taken with a "pinch of salt" Is because of the high saturation of graduates and not enough jobs ie not enough demand.
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    Not enough good graduates.
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    (Original post by Push_More_Button)
    Not enough good graduates.
    This most likely


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    Computer science could mean anything. The courses vary so much. If you go to a Russel group uni for CS or one of the good polytechnics with lots of industry connections I'm sure you'll do well.
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    (Original post by Singh89)
    Hello TSR

    As the title states...what has caused computer science graduates to have the highest rate of employment? I understand these reports should be taken with a "pinch of salt" Is because of the high saturation of graduates and not enough jobs ie not enough demand.
    Because: a) there are a lot of poor universities offering computer science degrees; the top ones tend to have solid stats, b) a lack of initiative to develop the programming skills and 'soft' skills necessary to pass interviews, c) lack of experience on their CVs, barring them from getting interviews in the first place.

    Re: point a, here's data to support it (tariff points = UCAS points achieved):


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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    b) a lack of initiative to develop 'soft' skills necessary to pass interviews, c) lack of experience on their CVs, barring them from getting interviews in the first place.
    I seriously doubt that there are universities out there that will purposely chase all their students to develop their soft skills. You either develop that through own initiative or experience.

    The unfortunately realisation about discussing these topics in here is that the very large majority of people on here haven't even finished college and are just about to apply to universities. Yet, they talk like they know it all. Applying to jobs is just about beating the system. There isn't a set way of how to do that. It's best to figure it out on your own.
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    In my experience in the industry thus far, British developers from a UK university are crap to say the least... Although oddly enough, British developers who have never been to university aren't too bad a developer compared with the graduates (probably because of their experience).

    Universities really need to teach their students about the real world and what they're likely to be working with and under what limitations. None of them seem to have an inkling of version control, older version of servers and languages, deployment, budgets, clean code, limitations and constraints, reports, teamwork, soft skills, communications, develop processes inline with other departments, cross-platform testing, even their CVs, popular libraries and frameworks and so much more etc. that's actually relevant and beneficial.

    And then it's a wonder why the know-it-alls with a degree think it miraculously entitles them to a job whilst foreign applicants or non-university applicants usually get the role. It can often be irritating to say the least. University careers advisors are a complete joke and waste of time in this industry and their advice on applications and CVs is just silly.

    At least get a GitHub account, side projects, some experience (personal or commercial), LinkedIn, portfolio and some open-source contributions at least. And that's just the tip of the iceberg.

    I will always hire or recommend the candidate that best fits the role and to an extent, the team they'll be integrating with. Thinking you know everything whilst a loner just doesn't cut it - there's more to it. I will also provide a test at one of the recruitment stages to the same standards as any candidate applying for the role - though this doesn't act as a basis for employment by itself unless the results are atrocious and prove no coding/development ability whatsoever to the level that we would expect - it does make for a good sifting stage however.
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    I am looking to pursue a career change away from my current industry where a commute has become impractical and unstainable on a long term basis despite doing it for several years but also being frustrated with the nature of the work. After achieving a 1st in my first degree I am considering doing a masters conversion course into computer science. I have invested in some short term courses but have made little influence. I believe practical/commerical experience is what will make the difference at the end of the day but I have been left with few options.
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    Computer science graduates that struggle to find work have a poorer CV, maybe lacking social skills and an idea that they are better than they are compared to entry positions available.
    Also this week I got told by someone that they don't do customer service, thereby restricting them from a huge number of available jobs.
    Also a degree is not a real substitute for professional qualifications specific to the area that they want to work in.
 
 
 
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