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    When I qualify as a nurse, I would like to work in the theatres. I was wondering if I did the right thing by going into nursing instead of ODP. I never knew much about the latter course and I've heard that both have a start on band 5. Does this apply to those who did the 2 year diploma course aswell?
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    Yes I think ODPs are a band 5 too, but pretty sure it's a 3 year course?

    Nursing also gives you way more options if you eventually don't want to work in theatres.
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    (Original post by amyc123)
    Yes I think ODPs are a band 5 too, but pretty sure it's a 3 year course?

    Nursing also gives you way more options if you eventually don't want to work in theatres.
    As far as I know, ODP has always been a 2 year diploma course. I think this year they started to make it a 3 year course. I was talking to a 2nd year ODP student in my placement and she told me she will qualify this year and that initially she wanted to do nursing but didn't get the grades so she went for ODP. So I wasn't sure if she will start of with a band 5, but it wouldn't fair given nurses have have more training to do.
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    The profession is moving towards the 3 year BSc, however some universities still offer the 2 year DipHe with scope to return and top up to the BSc. An ODP's training focuses on care of the perioperative patient where as nurse training is aimed at a much wider field. A lot of student nurses do not have the opportunity to do a placement in theatre, therefore the environment is completely new to them once they qualify. In theatre, nurses and ODP's are expected to deliver the same level of care to the patient, so it just depends on what route you would like to take into theatre. However, to be an anaesthetic nurse you have to complete postgraduate training where as an ODP can be employed straight into this field.

    ODP's are employed as a band 5 practitioner like nurses and have the same opportunities to progress to Band 8 such as Matron. There are also other roles such as Advanced Scrub Practitioner, Surgical Care Practitioner and Physician Associate that the ODP qualification can lead to.
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    I think they both start at band 5 but the obvious drawback of only doing the ODP course is that if you get fed up of working in theatres then you don't have the option of moving into another area whereas if you do nursing you can work in any area and speciality of nursing.
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    (Original post by alpaca13)
    The profession is moving towards the 3 year BSc, however some universities still offer the 2 year DipHe with scope to return and top up to the BSc. An ODP's training focuses on care of the perioperative patient where as nurse training is aimed at a much wider field. A lot of student nurses do not have the opportunity to do a placement in theatre, therefore the environment is completely new to them once they qualify. In theatre, nurses and ODP's are expected to deliver the same level of care to the patient, so it just depends on what route you would like to take into theatre. However, to be an anaesthetic nurse you have to complete postgraduate training where as an ODP can be employed straight into this field.

    ODP's are employed as a band 5 practitioner like nurses and have the same opportunities to progress to Band 8 such as Matron. There are also other roles such as Advanced Scrub Practitioner, Surgical Care Practitioner and Physician Associate that the ODP qualification can lead to.
    Yes you are right, we don't have placements in theatres which is sad because that's the area I've always wanted to specialise in. I've heard that newly qualified nurses can go straight into theatres? Not sure if one would need to top up first.
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    (Original post by RosyPearl)
    Yes you are right, we don't have placements in theatres which is sad because that's the area I've always wanted to specialise in. I've heard that newly qualified nurses can go straight into theatres? Not sure if one would need to top up first.
    You can go into theatres as an NQ nurse, you just won't be able to do anaesthetics (as in support the anaesthetist). A lot of theatres advertise looking for NQ nurses.
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    (Original post by moonkatt)
    You can go into theatres as an NQ nurse, you just won't be able to do anaesthetics (as in support the anaesthetist). A lot of theatres advertise looking for NQ nurses.
    Is there a course I would need to undertake to be able to do anaesthetics? Would you know how long it will be? Thanks
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    (Original post by RosyPearl)
    Is there a course I would need to undertake to be able to do anaesthetics? Would you know how long it will be? Thanks
    There is a course, it's usually done through your employer as they provide you with the clinical time you need to practice. It takes about six to eight months, it can be quite competitive to get onto in some trusts though, it depends where you are.
 
 
 
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