Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Hi

    We have exams at the end of the year for the WHOLE year of teaching.

    Is this normal for UK unis? I find it extremely difficult to revise 5 courses worth of whole year's teaching

    Why don't they have two exam periods and split the volume of information?

    any idea?
    • TSR Support Team
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Lol, you never cease to amaze me studos

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Lol, you never cease to amaze me studos

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I think thats a serous questions m8.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    yeah it is, I don't understand your hideous reaction

    in Austria afaik they have exams at the end of the SEMESTER not at the end of the WHOLE FKIN year

    is this another british unique stupidity?
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by studos)
    Hi

    We have exams at the end of the year for the WHOLE year of teaching.

    Is this normal for UK unis? I find it extremely difficult to revise 5 courses worth of whole year's teaching

    Why don't they have two exam periods and split the volume of information?

    any idea?
    (Original post by studos)
    yeah it is, I don't understand your hideous reaction

    in Austria afaik they have exams at the end of the SEMESTER not at the end of the WHOLE FKIN year

    is this another british unique stupidity?
    "Life isn't modular, why should exams be?" - that was the answer we were given at a Biology event at Oxford.

    A linear exam structure encourages deeper learning, with more of a focus on synoptic learning (i.e. making links between different bits). It also means you have plenty of time to prepare.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    No: most have assignments. Some have January exams.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jamestg)
    "Life isn't modular, why should exams be?" - that was the answer we were given at a Biology event at Oxford.

    A linear exam structure encourages deeper learning, with more of a focus on synoptic learning (i.e. making links between different bits). It also means you have plenty of time to prepare.
    Life isn't modular, why should TEACHING be modular then? Stupid sayings

    What? deeper learning? ahahahah that's hilarious. The stuff from the first semester are TOTALLY different than the second. There is NO connection at all, apart from Maths.

    And there is no more time to prepare at all. Considering it's double the material.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by studos)
    Life isn't modular, why should TEACHING be modular then? Stupid sayings

    What? deeper learning? ahahahah that's hilarious. The stuff from the first semester are TOTALLY different than the second. There is NO connection at all, apart from Maths.

    And there is no more time to prepare at all. Considering it's double the material.
    You gain very little from learning a module, revising it and then never looking at it again during your time at sixth form/uni.

    You signed up for it, so you're going to have to put up with it.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by studos)
    Why don't they have two exam periods and split the volume of information?

    any idea?
    Some do. My undergrad uni had end of year exams only when I was there, now they have exams in January and May. They switched when teaching went from "thin" modules (six modules taught over two terms) to "fat" modules (three modules taught each term, for two terms).

    Assessment methods are highly variable as each uni/ department/ course can set their own, so it's one of the criteria prospective students are advised to look at before chhosing courses.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by studos)
    Hi

    We have exams at the end of the year for the WHOLE year of teaching.

    Is this normal for UK unis? I find it extremely difficult to revise 5 courses worth of whole year's teaching

    Why don't they have two exam periods and split the volume of information?

    any idea?
    We have that. Yeah, it is pretty hard but let's be honest, it's the right thing to do. What's the point of studying stuff if you're allowed to just forget it after a few weeks?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    We have that. Yeah, it is pretty hard but let's be honest, it's the right thing to do. What's the point of studying stuff if you're allowed to just forget it after a few weeks?
    Your argument is a joke.
    You will forget them either way.
    It just takes you more time to revise.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • TSR Support Team
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by studos)
    Your argument is a joke.
    You will forget them either way.
    It just takes you more time to revise.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    That's not really true though, of course you'll forget some of it but you're a lot less likely to forget things if you've got the pressure of linear, synoptic exams.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Lol, you never cease to amaze me studos

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    (Original post by studos)
    yeah it is, I don't understand your hideous reaction

    in Austria afaik they have exams at the end of the SEMESTER not at the end of the WHOLE FKIN year

    is this another british unique stupidity?
    Woah... shots fired from studos 🔫
    Princepieman vs studos BEEF going down

    fight fight fight fight fight👊👊
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Trapz99)
    Woah... shots fired from studos 🔫
    Princepieman vs studos BEEF going down

    fight fight fight fight fight👊👊
    And you complain why I ignore you....

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Don't think it's a British uni thing. At my current uni we have exams in December and May, both of which contribute 50% to the final grade for that year.

    Also might be somewhat subject specific? With my subject we also have exams in October and March, on top of the December and May ones. We're the only school in the uni to do that, as far as I'm aware.

    All I can say is, I'm glad I don't have a huge exam at the end of the year. I think I'd have a breakdown with all the stuff I'd be expected to know.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TattyBoJangles)
    Don't think it's a British uni thing. At my current uni we have exams in December and May, both of which contribute 50% to the final grade for that year.

    Also might be somewhat subject specific? With my subject we also have exams in October and March, on top of the December and May ones. We're the only school in the uni to do that, as far as I'm aware.

    All I can say is, I'm glad I don't have a huge exam at the end of the year. I think I'd have a breakdown with all the stuff I'd be expected to know.
    Yeah I would also love more exams in smaller fractions of the material. Which uni are you?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    there used to be Jan exams

    but they scrapped that because theyre as$holes
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by studos)
    Yeah I would also love more exams in smaller fractions of the material. Which uni are you?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    St Andrews
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Sheffield has two exam seasons a year, with midterms and continuous assessment each semester
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    We had 10 'modules' in first year. In semester 1, there were 2 which had final exams in December (so 10 weeks' teaching then wk 11 was the exam), 1 which had the final exam in January (in the middle of week 2 of the next semester - no separate exam season), and the other 2 exams in May (in the actual exam season). The semester 2 modules, 1 had a wk11 exam before the easter break, the other 4 had exam season exams in May.

    A similar thing in second year, but in third year every module's final was in the May exam season.

    The ones which fell in semester time were counted as 'class tests' rather than exams (as they're not regulated by the central exam office). I believe that there was a rule about what proportion of your assessments could be done in-department, and what had to be done in central exams.

    I do think it is good to have some mid-year assessments (including essays etc) but the end of year exams does help you to have more time to reflect and make connections with what you are actually learning. Wherever you have a test immediately after the last week of teaching, it tended to be more MCQs and more surface-level knowledge. You need synthesis time.

    Where I work now, they have two separate exam seasons (whole of January and whole of May) and I think it really disrupts the flow of teaching (especially for those 'long thin' modules).
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
    Useful resources
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.