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Would 4 a levels give me a DISadvantage as an applicant for medicine? (NOT workwise) Watch

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    (Sorry if I sound like a person with a high ego! I just need to get my point across)

    I'm not talking about workwise and time and not having time for work experience etc etc.

    And I know studying 4 wouldn't give me any advantage etc etc.

    As the system for A levels has changed. I chose Chemistry, Biology, English Literature and Spanish.
    Before I continue...

    No. Maths isn't required, don't mention it.
    No. I haven't chosen 4 to look all flashy.

    So in the new system my subject choices are all "linear", so I can't drop any of them. I still have time to change but they are my definite choices.

    Let me put it into a scenario as to why I'm choosing 4:
    Let's say a student does well in work experience, interview, entry exams, etc etc, but all they have to do is meet the requirements of AAA.
    And let's say the student does get AA from chemistry and biology and then a C or B or something for english lit...BUT get's an A for spanish and they think "whew! almost lost my place".

    You may think, why don't you just study spanish, chemistry and biology? Well, I absolutely adore english literature, and I enjoy spanish, but I know spanish is my strongest subject so I'm confident by working hard and practising I'll be okay (that's why I also chose it as it would be sort of my "soft" subject). You probably think "pfft, she hasn't even started a levels yet, can't underestimate an A level". But I am familiar with language a levels I even tried it out this year(spanish) but stopped cos I thought it would be better to do in college, and I'm doing the french one this year.

    Anyway, now that the details are covered, I was checking out some uni websites but some were saying they want an AS level as the fourth instead but they weren't clear, and I'm not sure if the websites are updated because most a levels are going to be linear so you can't drop them and gain an AS qualification? That only applies to certain subjects?
    Thanks
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    So why do you think it would be a disadvantage?
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    As far as I am aware the standard route is 4 AS levels for your 1st year and 3 A levels for your 2nd year. When you sit the AS exams you gain an AS qualification but they contribute nothing to your A level grade, therefore if you decided to drop EngLit after your 1st year you still get an AS qualification in EngLit.
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    So why do you think it would be a disadvantage?
    Weirdly enough, I was told not to do 4 A2s by my college. So the OP maybe had a similar kind of experience.

    I think people are so keen to stress that it's not a big advantage, that they go to far the other way? But they're wrong lol, it's completely illogical that an extra A Level wouldn't make you more appealing to unis etc than a similar candidate without it. I'm sure it doesn't make a massive difference, but it's got to help hasn't it?

    Anyways, I didn't listen to my college and I'm doing 4 subjects I love and predicted A*s in all of them. So I'm pretty pleased with how that worked out!
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    Just remember OP, whilst you may have been given a conditional offer from unis of AAA, if you're doing 4 A Levels, it is possible, and in some cases very likely, that you will instead get yourself a conditional offer of AAAA.
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    Just remember OP, whilst you may have been given a conditional offer from unis of AAA, if you're doing 4 A Levels, it is possible, and in some cases very likely, that you will instead get yourself a conditional offer of AAAA.
    This isn't necessarily true, I do 4 a levels and my offer has only asked for a pass in the 4th subject
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    (Original post by Azula)
    This isn't necessarily true, I do 4 a levels and my offer has only asked for a pass in the 4th subject
    It's not guaranteed, but it is a possibility.

    So are you saying your offer is AAAC?
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    It's not guaranteed, but it is a possibility.

    So are you saying your offer is AAAC?
    A*AAE and E in my epq

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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    Just remember OP, whilst you may have been given a conditional offer from unis of AAA, if you're doing 4 A Levels, it is possible, and in some cases very likely, that you will instead get yourself a conditional offer of AAAA.
    What's the logic behind medical schools doing that?

    It seems strange to give out higher offers to people just because they're doing an extra A Level.
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    (Original post by TheLifelessRobot)
    As far as I am aware the standard route is 4 AS levels for your 1st year and 3 A levels for your 2nd year. When you sit the AS exams you gain an AS qualification but they contribute nothing to your A level grade, therefore if you decided to drop EngLit after your 1st year you still get an AS qualification in EngLit.
    That's what I thought as well, but from a college interview they said only "modular" a levels can be dropped, e.g. maths, philosophy, creative writing, electronics.

    Is it just that school that has that policy?
    Does anyone know if in the new system I could drop one of my subjects?
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    Because I'm confused how some unis say how they want an AS level? I wouldn't have one?
    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    So why do you think it would be a disadvantage?
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    What's the logic behind medical schools doing that?

    It seems strange to give out higher offers to people just because they're doing an extra A Level.
    Not sure about the logic.

    I just know that that's what often happens.
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    (Original post by geniequeen48)
    (Sorry if I sound like a person with a high ego! I just need to get my point across)

    I'm not talking about workwise and time and not having time for work experience etc etc.

    And I know studying 4 wouldn't give me any advantage etc etc.

    As the system for A levels has changed. I chose Chemistry, Biology, English Literature and Spanish.
    Before I continue...

    No. Maths isn't required, don't mention it.
    No. I haven't chosen 4 to look all flashy.

    So in the new system my subject choices are all "linear", so I can't drop any of them. I still have time to change but they are my definite choices.

    Let me put it into a scenario as to why I'm choosing 4:
    Let's say a student does well in work experience, interview, entry exams, etc etc, but all they have to do is meet the requirements of AAA.
    And let's say the student does get AA from chemistry and biology and then a C or B or something for english lit...BUT get's an A for spanish and they think "whew! almost lost my place".

    You may think, why don't you just study spanish, chemistry and biology? Well, I absolutely adore english literature, and I enjoy spanish, but I know spanish is my strongest subject so I'm confident by working hard and practising I'll be okay (that's why I also chose it as it would be sort of my "soft" subject). You probably think "pfft, she hasn't even started a levels yet, can't underestimate an A level". But I am familiar with language a levels I even tried it out this year(spanish) but stopped cos I thought it would be better to do in college, and I'm doing the french one this year.

    Anyway, now that the details are covered, I was checking out some uni websites but some were saying they want an AS level as the fourth instead but they weren't clear, and I'm not sure if the websites are updated because most a levels are going to be linear so you can't drop them and gain an AS qualification? That only applies to certain subjects?
    Thanks
    They can give you offers based on your 4 a-levels so they could give you AAAB whereas if you didn't have 4 you would get AAA
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    AAA is generally going to be better than AABB.

    Offers based on 4 A-levels won't generally lower the conditions for the 3 based on the standard offer, so you have to achieve highly in three and then still fulfil whatever condition they give you for the 4th.
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    Not sure about the logic.

    I just know that that's what often happens.
    Do you know how often it happens?

    I would have presumed that medical schools would just give their standard offer to everyone?

    I did four A Levels and all of my offers only specified three grades.

    Giving a higher offer to someone just because they do an extra A Level seems utterly illogical to me.
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    (Original post by geniequeen48)
    Because I'm confused how some unis say how they want an AS level? I wouldn't have one?
    I don't know how A Levels work after the recent reforms, but in the past, I think that would simply have meant "at least an AS level".
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    (Original post by geniequeen48)
    (Sorry if I sound like a person with a high ego! I just need to get my point across)

    I'm not talking about workwise and time and not having time for work experience etc etc.

    And I know studying 4 wouldn't give me any advantage etc etc.

    As the system for A levels has changed. I chose Chemistry, Biology, English Literature and Spanish.
    Before I continue...

    No. Maths isn't required, don't mention it.
    No. I haven't chosen 4 to look all flashy.

    So in the new system my subject choices are all "linear", so I can't drop any of them. I still have time to change but they are my definite choices.

    Let me put it into a scenario as to why I'm choosing 4:
    Let's say a student does well in work experience, interview, entry exams, etc etc, but all they have to do is meet the requirements of AAA.
    And let's say the student does get AA from chemistry and biology and then a C or B or something for english lit...BUT get's an A for spanish and they think "whew! almost lost my place".

    You may think, why don't you just study spanish, chemistry and biology? Well, I absolutely adore english literature, and I enjoy spanish, but I know spanish is my strongest subject so I'm confident by working hard and practising I'll be okay (that's why I also chose it as it would be sort of my "soft" subject). You probably think "pfft, she hasn't even started a levels yet, can't underestimate an A level". But I am familiar with language a levels I even tried it out this year(spanish) but stopped cos I thought it would be better to do in college, and I'm doing the french one this year.

    Anyway, now that the details are covered, I was checking out some uni websites but some were saying they want an AS level as the fourth instead but they weren't clear, and I'm not sure if the websites are updated because most a levels are going to be linear so you can't drop them and gain an AS qualification? That only applies to certain subjects?
    Thanks
    I'm literally in the exact same situation (with different subjects) and I was told the exact same thing. I think it's because with the
    new linear system we have to take our AS and A2 exams all in the second year instead of taking half in the first. This means when it comes to applying for UCAS at the beggining of year thirteen you cant put your results on the form as you havent actually achieved them yet, universities are only relying on your predicted grades. This is why taking an AS separately helps because if you take it next year and do well in it youve already secured a qualification. I suggest that either you take english as an AS and focus on it completely in year 12 so that you have a grade to show off on your ucas form, or alternatively if you can handle the work load pick up a different subject, take that as an AS and do the followimg four in year thirteen as full A level qualifications (which is what I'm doing).
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    (Original post by loukiawells)
    I'm literally in the exact same situation (with different subjects) and I was told the exact same thing. I think it's because with the
    new linear system we have to take our AS and A2 exams all in the second year instead of taking half in the first. This means when it comes to applying for UCAS at the beggining of year thirteen you cant put your results on the form as you havent actually achieved them yet, universities are only relying on your predicted grades. This is why taking an AS separately helps because if you take it next year and do well in it youve already secured a qualification. I suggest that either you take english as an AS and focus on it completely in year 12 so that you have a grade to show off on your ucas form, or alternatively if you can handle the work load pick up a different subject, take that as an AS and do the followimg four in year thirteen as full A level qualifications (which is what I'm doing).
    So I would most definitely be able to drop one my subjects and gain an AS? Or are you not entirely sure? Because I am planning to do the same as you (take all 4 to A2) because apparently I cant drop any of my a levels.
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    I don't think you read what I posted. But thanks for your input.
    (Original post by Alexion)
    AAA is generally going to be better than AABB.

    Offers based on 4 A-levels won't generally lower the conditions for the 3 based on the standard offer, so you have to achieve highly in three and then still fulfil whatever condition they give you for the 4th.
 
 
 
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