Global warming is good for us

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HucktheForde
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#1
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#1
1) the UK will have more sunny weather and not so cold

2) solar power will generate more energy and we can be energy self sufficient on sunlight alone.
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OddFuturez
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it will influence other countries in a negative way though
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DamnDaniel2
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There are advantages and disadvantages for basically everything. Like someone said it won't be good for other countries.


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the bear
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go global worming
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username1862217
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Coastal towns can flood more and heatwaves during summer could lead to higher deaths or water shortages.
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RF_PineMarten
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The immense damage global warming will likely cause is not outweighed at all by arguments about "nicer weather".

"Never mind the increase in all sorts of agricultural pests, disease carrying insects, invasive species, sea level rise, ocean acidification, changing vegetation, desertification and all sorts of other impacts, it's all fine because we'll get a bit of sun!" How ridiculous and selfish.
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CAElite
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You guys realise global warming will result in MUCH harsher winters for the UK. Increased melting of northern icecaps will disrupt the temperature of the Atlantic somewhat. Most notably the gulf stream which is what gives the UK and western Europe its temperate climate. Without warm Atlantic currents we would have slightly dryer weather but MUCH colder winters similar to Russia and Northern Canada of which we share a latitude.

Also the rise in sea levels due to said melting of ice cap puting most of England under a few metres of water. Although considering it would for the most part just be the South East this could be considered an advantage.

Also the untold ecological damage.
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ForestShadow
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LOSSES

Challenges for the NHSIncreased temperatures will mean a rise in heat-related mortality of 70% by the 2020s, compared with the 2000s, the Health Protection Agency (HPA) projects. This could increase to 540% by the 2080s, it adds.

Another concern is the possible spread of diseases, such as malaria. There could be "sustained transmission" - lasting for one month or more a year - in southern England by 2080, research suggests.

The government estimates that annual damages from flooding alone could increase to between £2bn and £12bn by the 2080s, an increase of about two to 10 times compared with current-day estimates.

Critical infrastructure, including water-pumping stations, water treatment works, transport and electricity systems, and schools and hospitals sited in flood-risk areas could also be threatened, while heavy rainfall events could increase the risk of water contamination should sewers overflow.

Current government estimates suggest about 330,000 properties are currently at risk of flooding, and climate change could increase this to between 630,000 and 1.2m by the 2080s.


GAINS

Nevertheless, the UK could see some gains from climate change. While summer deaths could increase given the predicted increase in hot days and heatwaves, the country could see a fall in the number of cold-related deaths – estimated to be in the region of 3,900 to 24,000 premature cold deaths avoided each year by 2050.

Providing water is available in sufficient supply, the UK could also see new crop types, or increased yields of crops such as wheat or sugar beet. For some areas of the UK, climate change could also offer wider opportunities for tourism. And for wildlife warmer temperatures could increase survival rates for offspring born in winter.
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DiddyDec01
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The seaside will be closed for everyone.
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Vikingninja
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How the hell would we get more solar power from global warming and even then how would we all be sufficient on just it?
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Abolisher
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'Climate change' it's been happening for millions of years.
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ihatePE
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(Original post by Abolisher)
'Climate change' it's been happening for millions of years.
with the burning and stuff, it's been faster than before though so the effect is scarier
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Abolisher
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(Original post by ihatePE)
with the burning and stuff, it's been faster than before though so the effect is scarier
Different studies show different things.... As peasants who don't know anything we can only guess.
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RF_PineMarten
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(Original post by ForestShadow)
LOSSES

Challenges for the NHSIncreased temperatures will mean a rise in heat-related mortality of 70% by the 2020s, compared with the 2000s, the Health Protection Agency (HPA) projects. This could increase to 540% by the 2080s, it adds.

Another concern is the possible spread of diseases, such as malaria. There could be "sustained transmission" - lasting for one month or more a year - in southern England by 2080, research suggests.

The government estimates that annual damages from flooding alone could increase to between £2bn and £12bn by the 2080s, an increase of about two to 10 times compared with current-day estimates.

Critical infrastructure, including water-pumping stations, water treatment works, transport and electricity systems, and schools and hospitals sited in flood-risk areas could also be threatened, while heavy rainfall events could increase the risk of water contamination should sewers overflow.

Current government estimates suggest about 330,000 properties are currently at risk of flooding, and climate change could increase this to between 630,000 and 1.2m by the 2080s.


GAINS

Nevertheless, the UK could see some gains from climate change. While summer deaths could increase given the predicted increase in hot days and heatwaves, the country could see a fall in the number of cold-related deaths – estimated to be in the region of 3,900 to 24,000 premature cold deaths avoided each year by 2050.

Providing water is available in sufficient supply, the UK could also see new crop types, or increased yields of crops such as wheat or sugar beet. For some areas of the UK, climate change could also offer wider opportunities for tourism. And for wildlife warmer temperatures could increase survival rates for offspring born in winter.
For wildlife, warming is a bad thing for things like hedgehogs, as more warm spells disrupt hibernation. Some species like capercaillie would probably go extinct in this country due to shifting vegetation zones. Then you've got increased risk of invasive species and new diseases.
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The Socktor
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(Original post by Mathemagicien)
Again, there are winners and losers. There would be mass extinctions, but new species would arise. In the short term, it would be an ecological disaster, but long term I don't think anyone knows.
I don't want to live on this planet anymore.
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ImagineCats
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why revise geography when u can post a controversial thread and sit back
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CAElite
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(Original post by Mathemagicien)
Since the UK is at an average of 160m above sea level, I think you are exaggerating your claims.

Again, there are winners and losers. There would be mass extinctions, but new species would arise. In the short term, it would be an ecological disaster, but long term I don't think anyone knows.
The 2nd statement I completely agree with, short term everythings ****ed. Long term, nobody knows.

1st statement. I said England, most notably the south east. London and the surrounding area average about ~30m above sea level. Thats close to "oh ****" terratory when SHTF. Meanwhile Scottish shipbuilding booms once again selling rafts to the yuppies!
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Virgili
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(Original post by DamnDaniel2)
There are advantages and disadvantages for basically everything. Like someone said it won't be good for other countries.


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Like who? Africa? Who cares
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username1973869
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To quote Andy Parsons: 'Britain has got to be the only place that gets colder, while everywhere else it's getting hotter'.
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Olie
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(Original post by Virgili)
Like who? Africa? Who cares
The millions of people living in those countries might care don't you think?
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