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    I'm currently studying maths, biology, chemistry and history. I'm planning on applying to apply to uni in October and am hoping to study biochemistry but I am also considering maths. Will I get in if I haven't got further maths? any advice would be great
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    (Original post by wjrichards99)
    I'm currently studying maths, biology, chemistry and history. I'm planning on applying to apply to uni in October and am hoping to study biochemistry but I am also considering maths. Will I get in if I haven't got further maths? any advice would be great
    Yes you will get in
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    (Original post by wjrichards99)
    I'm currently studying maths, biology, chemistry and history. I'm planning on applying to apply to uni in October and am hoping to study biochemistry but I am also considering maths. Will I get in if I haven't got further maths? any advice would be great
    Yes but AS FM next year wouldn't hurt.
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    (Original post by Ayaz789)
    Yes you will get in
    Thanks for the reply
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    Yes but AS FM next year wouldn't hurt.
    okay, thanks. I don't think i'll manage 4 a-levels and as-further maths as we do welsh bacc which is compulsory and is a lot of work!!! I might drop history and take up further maths next year
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    Further Maths is not a pre-requisite for the majority of undergraduate mathematics degrees but a distinction should be made about the type of mathematics degree you wish to pursue. For example, some universities show a clear distinction between applied and pure mathematics, whereas some just state mathematics, and the mathematics taught is of a more pure or applied nature. In this instance, having Further Pure can be beneficial for a pure mathematics course, though most first year of undergrad mathematics courses recap a-level maths and further pure at an accelerated rate. Thus the question you should be asking is which type of mathematics do you think you will enjoy or are more suited to. In this country, geometry is not taught much prior to university level study, though it holds a great deal of importance as you progress onto higher mathematics, however, depending on the course route you take, you might not cross it at all. What I am trying to say is, it is not enough to say you want to study maths, but rather which area you find most interested and try to find a University whose research department matches your interests, because their taught courses will reflect their research interests nearly always. This distinction was not abundantly clear to me when I was younger and I had to make the necessary adjustments later on, which is obviously more difficult.

    BSc Mathematics/ MSc Applied Mathematics

    P.S if your heart is set on pursuing a degree in maths, I would drop history and pick up further pure. If there is a possibility you are going to do one of the sciences, the change 'may' have little to no impact. However, the hard sciences have always been the most respected among A-Levels. Worth noting that the history of mathematics can be particularly important though I do not think an A-Level in history is necessary for it at all.

    I hope this has helped.
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    (Original post by ZeroVectorSystem)
    Further Maths is not a pre-requisite for the majority of undergraduate mathematics degrees but a distinction should be made about the type of mathematics degree you wish to pursue. For example, some universities show a clear distinction between applied and pure mathematics, whereas some just state mathematics, and the mathematics taught is of a more pure or applied nature. In this instance, having Further Pure can be beneficial for a pure mathematics course, though most first year of undergrad mathematics courses recap a-level maths and further pure at an accelerated rate. Thus the question you should be asking is which type of mathematics do you think you will enjoy or are more suited to. In this country, geometry is not taught much prior to university level study, though it holds a great deal of importance as you progress onto higher mathematics, however, depending on the course route you take, you might not cross it at all. What I am trying to say is, it is not enough to say you want to study maths, but rather which area you find most interested and try to find a University whose research department matches your interests, because their taught courses will reflect their research interests nearly always. This distinction was not abundantly clear to me when I was younger and I had to make the necessary adjustments later on, which is obviously more difficult.

    BSc Mathematics/ MSc Applied Mathematics

    P.S if your heart is set on pursuing a degree in maths, I would drop history and pick up further pure. If there is a possibility you are going to do one of the sciences, the change 'may' have little to no impact. However, the hard sciences have always been the most respected among A-Levels. Worth noting that the history of mathematics can be particularly important though I do not think an A-Level in history is necessary for it at all.

    I hope this has helped.
    Thanks, that was a really helpful reply. I'm still not sure if i would like to pursue biomedicine or maths but I'm definitely considering dropping history and taking further maths next year.
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    Well, take your time and think about it a lot. I mean if you go far enough down the rabbit hole in maths you can do mathematical biology, and statistical biomed but it might be boring lol depends on you.
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    (Original post by wjrichards99)
    I'm currently studying maths, biology, chemistry and history. I'm planning on applying to apply to uni in October and am hoping to study biochemistry but I am also considering maths. Will I get in if I haven't got further maths? any advice would be great
    Highly advisable
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    Depends on the uni.
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    Depends on the uni. Check the websites of universities you are considering.
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    You dont have to. I did my high school in Canada and so I didnt do A levels even; i did up until year 12. I didnt even do AP Calculus. Basically I didnt even know how to integrate when i started uni. I didnt know the normal curve is called the normal curve in statistics. (If youre curious of my maths background google MCV4U and MDM4U because a lot of people have been really curious). And i still do fine. I go to Southampton but with that qualification I even got into UCL. And i have little to no problems in uni, they kind of go through it really really quickly in the beginning. But honestly from what Ive heard from people who do further maths, we dont really use it in uni, not really. And some of my friends dont do further maths either and they seem fine. Esp in the subject im doing, we dont really use (or need) further maths topics; its not assumed or continued further.
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    (Original post by snapsh0t)
    You dont have to. I did my high school in Canada and so I didnt do A levels even; i did up until year 12. I didnt even do AP Calculus. Basically I didnt even know how to integrate when i started uni. I didnt know the normal curve is called the normal curve in statistics. (If youre curious of my maths background google MCV4U and MDM4U because a lot of people have been really curious). And i still do fine. I go to Southampton but with that qualification I even got into UCL. And i have little to no problems in uni, they kind of go through it really really quickly in the beginning. But honestly from what Ive heard from people who do further maths, we dont really use it in uni, not really. And some of my friends dont do further maths either and they seem fine. Esp in the subject im doing, we dont really use (or need) further maths topics; its not assumed or continued further.
    That depends very heavily on the uni. Try starting a maths degree without further maths at Cambridge, Warwick or Imperial and you're screwed.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    That depends very heavily on the uni. Try starting a maths degree without further maths at Cambridge, Warwick or Imperial and you're screwed.
    Ah yes perhaps that is the case, but I am just trying to make a point that it is still really possible to do a maths degree without further maths in a relatively good university.
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    (Original post by snapsh0t)
    Ah yes perhaps that is the case, but I am just trying to make a point that it is still really possible to do a maths degree without further maths in a relatively good university.
    I definitely agree with you there. :yes:
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    That depends very heavily on the uni. Try starting a maths degree without further maths at Cambridge, Warwick or Imperial and you're screwed.
    I'm not Cambridge material anyway:P
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    It is worth nothing that a number of universities that do not require that you study further maths may give you a favourable offer if you do. You can find requirements listed very clearly on university websites
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    Some universities require you to do further maths to either receive an offer or to lower an offer. That's the qualification-side of whether you do further maths or not.

    In terms of whether further maths will help you do a maths degree - it depends if you intend to do applied/physics, statistics/probability or discrete/combinatorics in your degree. Then mechanics, statistics or decision are helpful to each one respectively, but not helpful to the point of necessity. It's just nice to have them.

    The further pure modules are largely very helpful. I'd consider learning them over the summer if you're not doing further maths. It shouldn't take too long.
 
 
 
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