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    Hi all,

    This year I will be applying for the Archaeology with Foundation course at Durham (still deciding on what other unis I'll apply to) as a mature student at the ripe old age of 21. I fit the criteria and I have a teeny tiny bit of practical experience in archaeology, so being accepted is relatively feasible. The only thing I'm concerned about is the 'desirable' grade C in GCSE Maths which I don't have. I was considering getting a tutor so I can take the exam, but I wouldn't be able to afford more than a couple of hours a month, which is definitely not enough to get me a C. Since the course details state it as desirable, not essential, do you think it's possible to get in without it? I should also mention that the course is a BA, so less science based than Archaeology BS. I'm getting very stressed about it because I believe I would be a strong candidate if I didn't lack that grade!
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    A couple of hours tuition a month is enough to get a C. You can do a lot of the work yourself. Buy the GCSE course textbook, watch tutorials on YouTube and do as many past papers as you can get your hands on (tip: do the higher paper; it is easier to get a C than the foundation paper).

    I'm a surprised Durham says it is only desirable, most universities require all students to have a C-grade GCSE in maths and English before they can even be considered for a place. The majority of jobs also require it, so I think you should attempt to do it now.
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    A weeks revision and you can get a C is any GCSE subject.
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    You'd easily get it
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    I think it's possible to teach yourself with textbooks and the resources online. A tutor may be useful for the trickier areas.

    If you do decide to take the exam, feel free to inbox me if you need any help.
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    To get a C in maths I think you'd only really need to know division, multiplication and maybe fractions, which is simple enough.

    Honestly it's a piece of piss to get an A, let alone C, and any failure to get it before at school is an indictment on the school's peformance, not yours. Learning outside school, people go in thinking they're stupid and will struggle becuase of past failure at school, and come out with high marks.
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    Thanks for the replies guys! I emailed the head of the course and she said I can still be considered without it because they look at all the elements of the application rather than just the grades. Still, you guys make it sound so easy that I'm considering it again... I'm just worried that if i don't do well at it it will hurt my application.
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    (Original post by Neverdie)
    To get a C in maths I think you'd only really need to know division, multiplication and maybe fractions, which is simple enough..
    I am currently attending a maths class one a week at a local college, in order to resit my maths GCSE exams at foundation level. Some of the topics we cover include perpendicular bisectors, external angles of regular polygons, rearranging algebraic formulas, BIDMAS, negative numbers, standard index form and conversions (distances, currency etc.)

    I am not going to pretend that the standard of math which we are in the process of absorbing is super advanced, but if you have not recently engaged with any form of mathematical study, then it does take a little bit of effort to re-engage the more logical and pragmatic side of the brain. You need to re-familiarise yourself with some basic concepts (place value, long division) in order to proceed onwards with the rest of the material. If you find maths easy, then great, good for you. If it does not come quite so naturally, then yes, it does involve a certain degree of effort, study and revision.
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    (Original post by Cartagena)
    I am currently attending a maths class one a week at a local college, in order to resit my maths GCSE exams at foundation level. Some of the topics we cover include perpendicular bisectors, external angles of regular polygons, rearranging algebraic formulas, BIDMAS, negative numbers, standard index form and conversions (distances, currency etc.)

    I am not going to pretend that the standard of math which we are in the process of absorbing is super advanced, but if you have not recently engaged with any form of mathematical study, then it does take a little bit of effort to re-engage the more logical and pragmatic side of the brain. You need to re-familiarise yourself with some basic concepts (place value, long division) in order to proceed onwards with the rest of the material. If you find maths easy, then great, good for you. If it does not come quite so naturally, then yes, it does involve a certain degree of effort, study and revision.
    I think you're being taught a bit of higher level stuff there, but another thing to keep in mind anyway is that to get a C you can get a LOT wrong. I'm pretty sure you can actually get every question wrong and still get C with all the method marks!
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    (Original post by Cartagena)
    I am currently attending a maths class one a week at a local college, in order to resit my maths GCSE exams at foundation level. Some of the topics we cover include perpendicular bisectors, external angles of regular polygons, rearranging algebraic formulas, BIDMAS, negative numbers, standard index form and conversions (distances, currency etc.)

    I am not going to pretend that the standard of math which we are in the process of absorbing is super advanced, but if you have not recently engaged with any form of mathematical study, then it does take a little bit of effort to re-engage the more logical and pragmatic side of the brain. You need to re-familiarise yourself with some basic concepts (place value, long division) in order to proceed onwards with the rest of the material. If you find maths easy, then great, good for you. If it does not come quite so naturally, then yes, it does involve a certain degree of effort, study and revision.
    GCSE maths doesn't require any actual mathematical ability, it can all be learnt by wrote by building an 'instruction list' in your head on each type of problem.
 
 
 
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