Lifal12
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I've chosen the following subjects for A levels: Maths, Chemistry, Economics and Psychology.

I want to study Chemistry or Chemical Engineering at Uni but apparently Chemical Engineering has more employment opportunities and a much higher starting salary (+£10,000). On the other hand, Chemistry apparently involves more research and lab work which I'd enjoy more than industrial work (I'm okay with both tbh).

However, in some Universities, Chemical Engineering requires Maths, Chemistry and Physics. In other, such as Imperial, only Maths and Chemistry are required. Will I still be able to study Chemical Engineering without taking physics for A levels?

I'm awful at Physics but good at Maths and Chemistry. How much physics is involved in Chemical Engineering and will the physics side be taught well enough for me to understand - regardless of not taking it for A levels?

I plan on getting a master's degree either way but can't decide on whether Chemistry or Chemical Engineering would be more appropriate.

Also, would psychology reduce my chances of getting accepted to study Chemistry/Chemical Engineering since some universities don't even consider it a 'subject'?. If so, what alternative subject should I consider? (other than Further Maths and Physics).

Thanks
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hellomynameisr
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(Original post by Lifal12)
I've chosen the following subjects for A levels: Maths, Chemistry, Economics and Psychology.

I want to study Chemistry or Chemical Engineering at Uni but apparently Chemical Engineering has more employment opportunities and a much higher starting salary (+£10,000). On the other hand, Chemistry apparently involves more research and lab work which I'd enjoy more than industrial work (I'm okay with both tbh).

However, in some Universities, Chemical Engineering requires Maths, Chemistry and Physics. In other, such as Imperial, only Maths and Chemistry are required. Will I still be able to study Chemical Engineering without taking physics for A levels?

I'm awful at Physics but good at Maths and Chemistry. How much physics is involved in Chemical Engineering and will the physics side be taught well enough for me to understand - regardless of not taking it for A levels?

I plan on getting a master's degree either way but can't decide on whether Chemistry or Chemical Engineering would be more appropriate.

Also, would psychology reduce my chances of getting accepted to study Chemistry/Chemical Engineering since some universities don't even consider it a 'subject'?. If so, what alternative subject should I consider? (other than Further Maths and Physics).

Thanks
sorry but...further maths is probably needed by top unis
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sweeneyrod
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(Original post by Lifal12)
I've chosen the following subjects for A levels: Maths, Chemistry, Economics and Psychology.

I want to study Chemistry or Chemical Engineering at Uni but apparently Chemical Engineering has more employment opportunities and a much higher starting salary (+£10,000). On the other hand, Chemistry apparently involves more research and lab work which I'd enjoy more than industrial work (I'm okay with both tbh).

However, in some Universities, Chemical Engineering requires Maths, Chemistry and Physics. In other, such as Imperial, only Maths and Chemistry are required. Will I still be able to study Chemical Engineering without taking physics for A levels?

I'm awful at Physics but good at Maths and Chemistry. How much physics is involved in Chemical Engineering and will the physics side be taught well enough for me to understand - regardless of not taking it for A levels?

I plan on getting a master's degree either way but can't decide on whether Chemistry or Chemical Engineering would be more appropriate.

Also, would psychology reduce my chances of getting accepted to study Chemistry/Chemical Engineering since some universities don't even consider it a 'subject'?. If so, what alternative subject should I consider? (other than Further Maths and Physics).

Thanks
If you're thinking of applying to Imperial and similar unis, I'd definitely reconsider not doing physics (or further maths, but physics is easier and more sensible).
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carpe.noctem
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(Original post by Lifal12)
I've chosen the following subjects for A levels: Maths, Chemistry, Economics and Psychology.

I want to study Chemistry or Chemical Engineering at Uni but apparently Chemical Engineering has more employment opportunities and a much higher starting salary (+£10,000). On the other hand, Chemistry apparently involves more research and lab work which I'd enjoy more than industrial work (I'm okay with both tbh).

However, in some Universities, Chemical Engineering requires Maths, Chemistry and Physics. In other, such as Imperial, only Maths and Chemistry are required. Will I still be able to study Chemical Engineering without taking physics for A levels?

I'm awful at Physics but good at Maths and Chemistry. How much physics is involved in Chemical Engineering and will the physics side be taught well enough for me to understand - regardless of not taking it for A levels?

I plan on getting a master's degree either way but can't decide on whether Chemistry or Chemical Engineering would be more appropriate.

Also, would psychology reduce my chances of getting accepted to study Chemistry/Chemical Engineering since some universities don't even consider it a 'subject'?. If so, what alternative subject should I consider? (other than Further Maths and Physics).

Thanks
If the uni's your thinking of applying to require just maths and chemistry then all you need is MATHS AND CHEMISTRY, taking physics will pose no advantage unless it is stated by the university on their website. Some people clearly don't know how universities work so things like "if your aiming for a top uni then yo should do physics" unless it is stated by a uni that they require physics then YOU DON'T NEED TO DO IT and it will be no advantage over someone who doesn't, and yes I do believe that both UCL and imperial don't require physics and also a thing to note is that UCL actually prefer you to do non science or contrasting subjects along with your science A-levels, so in that case your a-level choices right now would actually give you an advantage.
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Smack
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(Original post by Lifal12)
I've chosen the following subjects for A levels: Maths, Chemistry, Economics and Psychology.

I want to study Chemistry or Chemical Engineering at Uni but apparently Chemical Engineering has more employment opportunities and a much higher starting salary (+£10,000). On the other hand, Chemistry apparently involves more research and lab work which I'd enjoy more than industrial work (I'm okay with both tbh).

However, in some Universities, Chemical Engineering requires Maths, Chemistry and Physics. In other, such as Imperial, only Maths and Chemistry are required. Will I still be able to study Chemical Engineering without taking physics for A levels?

I'm awful at Physics but good at Maths and Chemistry. How much physics is involved in Chemical Engineering and will the physics side be taught well enough for me to understand - regardless of not taking it for A levels?

I plan on getting a master's degree either way but can't decide on whether Chemistry or Chemical Engineering would be more appropriate.

Also, would psychology reduce my chances of getting accepted to study Chemistry/Chemical Engineering since some universities don't even consider it a 'subject'?. If so, what alternative subject should I consider? (other than Further Maths and Physics).

Thanks
If you're not good at physics then perhaps engineering isn't the degree or vocation for you since much of it revolves around the application of physics principles.
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Lifal12
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After watching many videos on past AS/A2 physics exam questions, I feel like I could be comfortable with doing these: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...wCk_xh7TLgXZ7P Maybe physics isn't as scary as people make it out to be

Quick questions: Are these formulae given in the exams or are you expected to remember all of these? And since all of the exams are now at the end of the 2 years, will the number of exams be the same as AS exams + A2 exams or will it be half the number (only A2 exams)?

If I replace Psychology with Physics, would it be impressive/suitable to take Chemical Engineering with Maths, Chemistry, Physics and Economics?
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ODES_PDES
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I would have taken Chemistry, Physics, Maths and Further Maths.
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