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    What ways would you consider the most efficient to study/revise AS-level Biology?
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    (Original post by Philip-flop)
    What ways would you consider the most efficient to study/revise AS-level Biology?
    draw lots of diagrams ,make notes sometimes you even find play cards online that helps and previous papers most of it is really from previous papers be it any exam hope it helps
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    (Original post by megh12)
    draw lots of diagrams ,make notes sometimes you even find play cards online that helps and previous papers most of it is really from previous papers be it any exam hope it helps
    Thank you!! I think it's true that doing previous papers will help a lot with revision and exam technique!
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    (Original post by Philip-flop)
    Thank you!! I think it's true that doing previous papers will help a lot with revision and exam technique!
    yup its definetly true most of our questions during my exam were from previous papers just framed a bit differently !!! hope you do well ace it
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    First of all you make a plan of how many days you have before the exams and which of these days you have commitments on (eg attending college). You then divide up evenings into 3 x 45 minute shifts spaced by 15 minute breaks. On a free day eg Saturday, you should aim to complete 8 shifts. Count up the number of slots and revise TWICE. The first cycle of revision should take up 2/3 of your time and the second cycle 1/3.
    Break the first cycle up by the number of subjects being studied, placing most emphasis on your weakest subject. One problem I see frequently as a tutor is a student that loves one subject, is estimated an A on that subject, and then they devote 90% of their time to study that one, avoiding the other subjects as they find them dull. You spend MOST time on your weaker subject.
    On the first cycle of revision you should not be doing many past papers. It is about rote learning and fact recall. Read the notes and then jot down bullet points of what you recall. Then go back to your notes and focus on what you have missed out.
    You should leave 1 evening a week revision free or you will get revision fatigue and just fed up.
    On the second cycle, summarise the main points and focus on past papers. Try to identify where on the past papers you lose marks. Most people drop marks on the "how science works" topics, but I have come across a few students who are weak on essay type questions as they cannot express themselves with the correct jargon.
    Always learn definitions WORD for WORD eg a species is defined as..... an ecosystem is defined as.... These are easy marks if you have memorised it.
    Study alone, at a desk, with mobile phones switched off. I get students who try and study and then get distracted by text message alerts or FB notifications. Check your phone on a study break, not when you are revising.
    Do not compare yourself to other people. There will always be people who lie and claim they know it all. These people normally end up failing as they are just mouthing off.
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    (Original post by benion)
    First of all you make a plan of how many days you have before the exams and which of these days you have commitments on (eg attending college). You then divide up evenings into 3 x 45 minute shifts spaced by 15 minute breaks. On a free day eg Saturday, you should aim to complete 8 shifts. Count up the number of slots and revise TWICE. The first cycle of revision should take up 2/3 of your time and the second cycle 1/3.
    Break the first cycle up by the number of subjects being studied, placing most emphasis on your weakest subject. One problem I see frequently as a tutor is a student that loves one subject, is estimated an A on that subject, and then they devote 90% of their time to study that one, avoiding the other subjects as they find them dull. You spend MOST time on your weaker subject.
    On the first cycle of revision you should not be doing many past papers. It is about rote learning and fact recall. Read the notes and then jot down bullet points of what you recall. Then go back to your notes and focus on what you have missed out.
    You should leave 1 evening a week revision free or you will get revision fatigue and just fed up.
    On the second cycle, summarise the main points and focus on past papers. Try to identify where on the past papers you lose marks. Most people drop marks on the "how science works" topics, but I have come across a few students who are weak on essay type questions as they cannot express themselves with the correct jargon.
    Always learn definitions WORD for WORD eg a species is defined as..... an ecosystem is defined as.... These are easy marks if you have memorised it.
    Study alone, at a desk, with mobile phones switched off. I get students who try and study and then get distracted by text message alerts or FB notifications. Check your phone on a study break, not when you are revising.
    Do not compare yourself to other people. There will always be people who lie and claim they know it all. These people normally end up failing as they are just mouthing off.
    Thank you!! This seems like very useful advice and you sound like you know exactly what to do for exam preparation!! I'll try to stick to your systematic schedule that you have mentioned but when I start panicking I know for a fact that I'm going to go over the amount of time you've recommended
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    (Original post by Philip-flop)
    Thank you!! This seems like very useful advice and you sound like you know exactly what to do for exam preparation!! I'll try to stick to your systematic schedule that you have mentioned but when I start panicking I know for a fact that I'm going to go over the amount of time you've recommended
    Going over the recommended amount of shifts is brilliant. I struggle normally to get students to do those hours as frequently there are issues with motivation.
 
 
 
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