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    Hello

    What (if any) difference is there between a dipole molecule and a polar covalent bond? Is it just that a dipole molecule has a covalent polar bond?

    Sorry if this is a basic question, I've been looking for a simple answer all over Google, but haven't found one.

    Thanks in advance!
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    A polar covalent bond is a covalent bond that is polar.
    A dipole molecule is a molecule that is polar.

    A molecule with polar covalent bonds is not necessarily polar(eg. BF_3).
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    A polar covalent bond is a covalent bond that is polar.
    A dipole molecule is a molecule that is polar.

    A molecule with polar covalent bonds is not necessarily polar(eg. BF_3).
    Thanks for the info. So, there are dipole molecules with many types of bonds, for example ionic?
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    (Original post by the81kid)
    Thanks for the info. So, there are dipole molecules with many types of bonds, for example ionic?
    No, just covalent.
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    No, just covalent.
    So... there are covalent bonds. Some of these can be polar. Polar covalent bond (describing the bond) and dipolar (describing the molecule) are both terms for the same thing (except that one is describing the bond, and the other describing the molecule)?
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    (Original post by the81kid)
    Thanks for the info. So, there are dipole molecules with many types of bonds, for example ionic?
    It cannot be ionic as the dipoles indicate the shift of the shared electrons, so a more electronegative element would have a more negative dipole as it attracts electrons more whereas in ionic compounds electrons are donated so thus aren't shared and can't have dipoles.
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    (Original post by KaylaB)
    It cannot be ionic as the dipoles indicate the shift of the shared electrons, so a more electronegative element would have a more negative dipole as it attracts electrons more whereas in ionic compounds electrons are donated so thus aren't shared and can't have dipoles.
    Thanks. My chemistry is not great. I've been teaching myself Biology A-Level, mostly because I'm quite good at the social/ecological aspects at least. Chemistry is quite new for me.

    So is this correct:
    There are covalent bonds. Some of these can be polar. Polar covalent bond (describing the bond) and dipolar (describing the molecule) are both terms for the same thing (except that one is describing the bond, and the other describing the molecule)?
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    (Original post by the81kid)
    Thanks. My chemistry is not great. I've been teaching myself Biology A-Level, mostly because I'm quite good at the social/ecological aspects at least. Chemistry is quite new for me.

    So is this correct:
    There are covalent bonds. Some of these can be polar. Polar covalent bond (describing the bond) and dipolar (describing the molecule) are both terms for the same thing (except that one is describing the bond, and the other describing the molecule)?
    I think so
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    (Original post by KaylaB)
    I think so
    Thanks for the information. Is that a yes? Where can I check?
    I'm just trying to make myself more certain of the concepts.
    In any case, thanks a lot.
 
 
 
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