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Should pensioners be given the option of death? (Discuss) watch

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    After a certain age, should the option of a painless and quiet passing be given to patients? If the given person believes that they cannot contribute to society, have no grandchildren they want to help or just want to give a larger inheritance to their children, should they be given the option of a painless and quiet death in their sleep?

    Discuss.

    EDIT: I believe it would solve many problems. The housing bubble we have right now, where our ageing population is taking up housing space making it impossible for young people to get a foothold in the housing market and the increasing strain on the NHS with the care of pensioners on funding and ward space.
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    I believe so, but only if it is that person's decision and they are ready to pass on.

    It is better to go out painlessly and with dignity than suffer needlessly.
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    :shakecane:
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    Yes. As long as they are with it still. It's their choice
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    Everyone already has the option of death - suicide is legal.
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    (Original post by Stychomythia)
    Everyone already has the option of death - suicide is legal.
    But assisted suicide isn't.

    This is an issue because how can you kill yourself without help from doctors in a way that you can make sure is painless? It's very difficult, and leads to botched suicides which can be horrible.

    This is why many argue that certain individuals, usually those with a terminal illness with <6 months to live, should be able to choose when to die, with a doctor's help. However, this is currently illegal in the UK.
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    (Original post by AJ KO)
    But assisted suicide isn't.

    This is an issue because how can you kill yourself without help from doctors in a way that you can make sure is painless? It's very difficult, and leads to botched suicides which can be horrible.

    This is why many argue that certain individuals, usually those with a terminal illness with <6 months to live, should be able to choose when to die, with a doctor's help. However, this is currently illegal in the UK.
    Very good point. Suicides as of now are extremely messy. Often they aren't successful, and use painful methods such as bleeding out, hanging or overdose. A simple, cheap and painless injection administered by medical professionals is better for everybody in my opinion.
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    (Original post by gregy521)
    After a certain age, should the option of a painless and quiet passing be given to patients? If the given person believes that they cannot contribute to society, have no grandchildren they want to help or just want to give a larger inheritance to their children, should they be given the option of a painless and quiet death in their sleep?

    Discuss.
    yes they should be able to do what they want in matters like these
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    (Original post by gregy521)
    Very good point. Suicides as of now are extremely messy. Often they aren't successful, and use painful methods such as bleeding out, hanging or overdose. A simple, cheap and painless injection administered by medical professionals is better for everybody in my opinion.
    There's also the issue where paralysed individuals, such as in the famous case of Tony Nicklinson, physically cannot kill themselves (other than by starving themselves to death). In extreme cases, such individuals lose all ability to communicate, so that raises the issue of consent (ergo, can such individuals consent to assisted suicide?).

    Unfortunately, in the famous case of Nicklinson, the SC declined to change the law on assisted suicide (or in fact issue an Article 4 declaration of incompatibility between s.2(1) of the Suicide Act 1967 and Article 8 of the ECHR), and instead referred the issue to Parliament. Recently there was a bill that proposed decriminalising assisted suicide (Lord Falconer's Assisted Suicide Bill), however, this was rejected by MPs in the HoC 330-118, so the prospects for a change in the law are bleak.
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    My worry with if pensioners did have the option of death is that they might be pressured into it, and with the option, they might feel that it's their only option and that by getting old they are a burden to society or their family, some members of which may pressure them into it for the sake of inheritance. If it was legalised for pensioners to have assisted suicide then it's almost normalising it for no real reason. It's different of course if they have a serious or terminal illness, but if they are just a typical pensioner, no serious health concerns, then more should be done to promote their well-being to lead a great retirement and if they have no family then they should be given the option of support, not the option of death.
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    (Original post by AJ KO)
    There's also the issue where paralysed individuals, such as in the famous case of Tony Nicklinson, physically cannot kill themselves (other than by starving themselves to death). In extreme cases, such individuals lose all ability to communicate, so that raises the issue of consent (ergo, can such individuals consent to assisted suicide?).

    Unfortunately, in the famous case of Nicklinson, the SC declined to change the law on assisted suicide (or in fact issue an Article 4 declaration of incompatibility between s.2(1) of the Suicide Act 1967 and Article 8 of the ECHR), and instead referred the issue to Parliament. Recently there was a bill that proposed decriminalising assisted suicide (Lord Falconer's Assisted Suicide Bill), however, this was rejected by MPs in the HoC 330-118, so the prospects for a change in the law are bleak.
    I think the first case was rejected because of political climate. It was the 1960s. It's unlikely to have worked in that time. A more recent debate might still be denied because of taboo, but I think that if the public shows support for it, MP's can actually debate it in the HoC without fear of being judged as immoral by the public.
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    I feel like pulling my hair
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    (Original post by -CarpeDiem-)
    My worry with if pensioners did have the option of death is that they might be pressured into it, and with the option, they might feel that it's their only option and that by getting old they are a burden to society or their family, some members of which may pressure them into it for the sake of inheritance. If it was legalised for pensioners to have assisted suicide then it's almost normalising it for no real reason. It's different of course if they have a serious or terminal illness, but if they are just a typical pensioner, no serious health concerns, then more should be done to promote their well-being to lead a great retirement and if they have no family then they should be given the option of support, not the option of death.
    I agree with what you say in general and think it's a reasonable middle ground, but why not support and the option of death?

    Ultimately it comes down to how paternalistic you think the government should be vis-a-vis its citizens.

    (Original post by gregy521)
    I think the first case was rejected because of political climate. It was the 1960s. It's unlikely to have worked in that time. A more recent debate might still be denied because of taboo, but I think that if the public shows support for it, MP's can actually debate it in the HoC without fear of being judged as immoral by the public.
    No, the Nicklinson case I mentioned was heard in the UK Supreme Court in 2014, and the Assisted Dying Bill was rejected by MPs in Parliament only last year. But you are right about public opinion, a 2015 poll showed that 82% of people supported the Assisted Dying Bill.

    http://www.newlawjournal.co.uk/nlj/c...suicide-appeal
    http://www.theguardian.com/society/2...ted-dying-bill
    http://www.dignityindying.org.uk/ass...ublic-opinion/
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    I agree with the poster who said that some older people might be/feel pressured into it if they are a 'burden'. Really what we need is for elderly people to have appropriate levels of support and activity so they can be fulfilled and still involved in society as much as possible.
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    (Original post by doodle_333)
    I agree with the poster who said that some older people might be/feel pressured into it if they are a 'burden'. Really what we need is for elderly people to have appropriate levels of support and activity so they can be fulfilled and still involved in society as much as possible.
    Is the fear of people being coerced into ending their life sufficient to justify a blanket ban on assisted suicide?

    Why not, instead of having people go abroad or have to end their lives in pain, introduce safeguards into the law that lets people choose when to live their lives, whilst mitigating against the risks of coercion?
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    (Original post by doodle_333)
    I agree with the poster who said that some older people might be/feel pressured into it if they are a 'burden'. Really what we need is for elderly people to have appropriate levels of support and activity so they can be fulfilled and still involved in society as much as possible.
    However, that's the problem that many people have when they retire. They don't have anything to do. Just idly sitting at home watching midday television. That's no way to live. I support the movement of satisfaction in your early years. University is supposed to be the best years of your life. I think that should carry on for a while during your preparation for work, then people can retire a bit later and help in the training of the newer generation.
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    No what is wrong with you guys. It is immoral and wrong, in my opinion.
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    Yes.

    I wont have children as I dont want them so one day when my parents and partner have all died I will be alone, if I live to old age. I can imagine myself killing myself if and when that happens and I dont think thats a bad thing if you have lived a full and happy life and just decide that being a lonely old fart is not worth it for you. Assisted suicide will be available everywhere by the time we are old, which will be great cause no more suffering for people with terminal illnesses etc. Its awful that it isnt legal yet, why would you not help a terminally ill person die if they are suffering? Its cruel and it could easily be prevented.
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    (Original post by Trapz99)
    No what is wrong with you guys. It is immoral and wrong, in my opinion.
    Could you explain? We aren't putting a pillow over their heads, we are offering an option for peace. They aren't obligated to take it in any way, it's just there.
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    (Original post by Trapz99)
    No what is wrong with you guys. It is immoral and wrong, in my opinion.
    Well, who can argue with that brilliantly articulated destruction of the proposition. :facepalm2:
 
 
 
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