Katielk97
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Hey I got BBB for my AS levels and I was wondering if it is possible to get AAA at A2, my teachers have predicted me to get A*AA so obviously they think it is possible but I was just wondering if anyone has done the same before?? Or has anyone moved up a grade or two and has a success story to share thanks.
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undercxver
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Revision techniques vary from subject to subject.

I may be able to help if you if you tell me what subjects do you do.
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Katielk97
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(Original post by undercxver)
Revision techniques vary from subject to subject.

I may be able to help if you if you tell me what subjects do you do.
History law and English
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undercxver
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(Original post by Katielk97)
History law and English
I have tips for history...

Using a Text Book:

Use textbooks to create your own little revision guide. Don't just copy out what the book says, your your comprehension skills to write out your notes in a way that suits you. This way when you read back you wouldn't feel the need to take longer to grasp what has been stated. Go through the book chapter by chapter. Make your notes as detailed, but no too detailed. All you need to make sure is if your notes encounter what the course specification entails.

If you find it effective, you can read these notes on the morning before he exam.

This method is preferred to be used when you have a good amount of time till the exams, so you'll be able to fit in your past paper revision too.

5 Minutes to Spare Revision:

This 5 minute revision technique is something to do when you're feeling as if you lack knowledge on the content of your course with the use of your notes or text book.
  1. Read through one section/page of your text book
  2. Close the book; speak to yourself about what that section includes
  3. Open the book, check if correct
  4. If correct move on to next page, if incorrect then repeat steps
Condensing Content/Speeding up Revision:
  • Summarise the content of each module on one sheet of paper and memorise this
  • Condense events into 3 bullet points (linking with the point above)
  • Make a list of significant events and their dates and highlight each one you manage to remember
  • Do every single past paper question
  • Plan your essays with bullet points within a minute
  • Time yourself when doing essays
  • Practice writing really fast
  • If you're struggling with content then go through a revision book.
  • If teachers tell you some sort of prediction I suggest you don't go by it and revise everything!
Source Questions:

Not sure what specification or exam board you're doing, if it includes source questions then here are some tips.

You need to consider the following things:
  • Purpose: What's the purpose of the source? (e.g. to inform, to describe etc.)
  • Author: Who's the author of the source? Does this make them biased in any way?
  • Nature: What type of source is it? (e.g. book, report, article etc.)
  • Date: When was it published? Does the date have any significance? Is it outdated?
  • Audience: Who was the audience? How did it impact them? [this one isn't neccessary]
General questions to ask yourself:
  • How useful is the source?
  • Did the author/writer omit anything?
  • Is there any bias? -Why is there bias? How is it neutral?
AS Level/A Level History Exam Answer Structure:

Again, not sure which exam board you're doing. This is specifically for the old AQA specification. However, same structure may be applicable.
Spoiler:
Show
Introduction:

Write a short introduction for your 24 marker, not the 12. Roughy explain the points you are going to discuss.

How many paragraphs should I write?

12 marker: From 3 to 4 paragraphs (excluding conclusion).
24 marker: From 5 to 6 paragraphs (excluding conclusion), though this may vary depending on how strong each point is.

What structure should my paragraph be in?

PEEL.

Point: What are you talking about in this paragraph?
Evidence: Provide evidence for what you are talking about.
Explain: Explain your evidence, what does it show?
Link: Create a link to be able to bring your essay together, this way your paragraph would sync with your next. (Neccessary for a Level 4 answer in a 12 marker and a Level 5 answer for a 24 marker)

Should I discuss significance?

Yes. Do not miss this out in a 24 marker, it should be included somewhere in your essay. Most suitable place to identify the most and least significant factor/point is in the conclusion.

Conclusion:

Summarise your points by discussing significance/success/impact. What's your opinion?

How can I achieve the top marks?
  • Include historians views on this, just remember generic views - something almost everyone believes in. A good historian to use is Andrew Marr (I always use this historian in my essay).
  • Discuss significance
  • Make sure all points have a link, don't be jumping to a different topic in your essay or it won't flow.
  • Read into what you are studying, and enjoy it. That way you get a taste of the subject and can write your essays in that sort of format.
  • Don't forget to answer the question. So easy to forget what you are talking about. Keep looking back at what the question is sot you can address that rather than going off topic.
  • Explicitly say "therefore this can/cannot be considered successful/unsuccessful"
  • Avoid a narrative approach


Some revision methods can be used for Law. Not sure about English, sorry.
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Katielk97
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#5
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#5
(Original post by undercxver)
I have tips for history...

Using a Text Book:

Use textbooks to create your own little revision guide. Don't just copy out what the book says, your your comprehension skills to write out your notes in a way that suits you. This way when you read back you wouldn't feel the need to take longer to grasp what has been stated. Go through the book chapter by chapter. Make your notes as detailed, but no too detailed. All you need to make sure is if your notes encounter what the course specification entails.

If you find it effective, you can read these notes on the morning before he exam.

This method is preferred to be used when you have a good amount of time till the exams, so you'll be able to fit in your past paper revision too.

5 Minutes to Spare Revision:

This 5 minute revision technique is something to do when you're feeling as if you lack knowledge on the content of your course with the use of your notes or text book.
  1. Read through one section/page of your text book
  2. Close the book; speak to yourself about what that section includes
  3. Open the book, check if correct
  4. If correct move on to next page, if incorrect then repeat steps
Condensing Content/Speeding up Revision:
  • Summarise the content of each module on one sheet of paper and memorise this
  • Condense events into 3 bullet points (linking with the point above)
  • Make a list of significant events and their dates and highlight each one you manage to remember
  • Do every single past paper question
  • Plan your essays with bullet points within a minute
  • Time yourself when doing essays
  • Practice writing really fast
  • If you're struggling with content then go through a revision book.
  • If teachers tell you some sort of prediction I suggest you don't go by it and revise everything!
Source Questions:

Not sure what specification or exam board you're doing, if it includes source questions then here are some tips.

You need to consider the following things:
  • Purpose: What's the purpose of the source? (e.g. to inform, to describe etc.)
  • Author: Who's the author of the source? Does this make them biased in any way?
  • Nature: What type of source is it? (e.g. book, report, article etc.)
  • Date: When was it published? Does the date have any significance? Is it outdated?
  • Audience: Who was the audience? How did it impact them? [this one isn't neccessary]
General questions to ask yourself:
  • How useful is the source?
  • Did the author/writer omit anything?
  • Is there any bias? -Why is there bias? How is it neutral?
AS Level/A Level History Exam Answer Structure:

Again, not sure which exam board you're doing. This is specifically for the old AQA specification. However, same structure may be applicable.
Spoiler:
Show
Introduction:

Write a short introduction for your 24 marker, not the 12. Roughy explain the points you are going to discuss.

How many paragraphs should I write?

12 marker: From 3 to 4 paragraphs (excluding conclusion).
24 marker: From 5 to 6 paragraphs (excluding conclusion), though this may vary depending on how strong each point is.

What structure should my paragraph be in?

PEEL.

Point: What are you talking about in this paragraph?
Evidence: Provide evidence for what you are talking about.
Explain: Explain your evidence, what does it show?
Link: Create a link to be able to bring your essay together, this way your paragraph would sync with your next. (Neccessary for a Level 4 answer in a 12 marker and a Level 5 answer for a 24 marker)

Should I discuss significance?

Yes. Do not miss this out in a 24 marker, it should be included somewhere in your essay. Most suitable place to identify the most and least significant factor/point is in the conclusion.

Conclusion:

Summarise your points by discussing significance/success/impact. What's your opinion?

How can I achieve the top marks?
  • Include historians views on this, just remember generic views - something almost everyone believes in. A good historian to use is Andrew Marr (I always use this historian in my essay).
  • Discuss significance
  • Make sure all points have a link, don't be jumping to a different topic in your essay or it won't flow.
  • Read into what you are studying, and enjoy it. That way you get a taste of the subject and can write your essays in that sort of format.
  • Don't forget to answer the question. So easy to forget what you are talking about. Keep looking back at what the question is sot you can address that rather than going off topic.
  • Explicitly say "therefore this can/cannot be considered successful/unsuccessful"
  • Avoid a narrative approach

Some revision methods can be used for Law. Not sure about English, sorry.
Thank you!! That will help a lot I'm sure ☺️
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