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    Hi,

    If anyone has done the MA in Social Work previously, please can you let me know what your timetable was like? I am on a full time course now but it is only 3 days so i am just curious to know what this will be like?

    Thank you
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    Hey,

    I completed the MA social work course at LJMU from 2012-2014, so it might have changed quite a bit since then. However, I can't imagine the general hours per week will have changed too much, as there's still a lot to learn!

    Monday: 9:30am to 4:30pm
    Tuesday: 9:30am to 4:30pm
    Wednesday - Off
    Thursday: 9:30am to 4:30pm
    Friday: 9:30am to 12:30pm (split into groups 1 and 2, with each group only coming in for 90 minutes [9:30am-11am or 11am-12:30pm])

    Monday and Tuesday was for the 'larger' modules, which would take up the entire day. Thursday was divided into a Law module in the morning, and a poverty and social exclusion module in the afternoon. Friday was a seminar for the law module, which would be more interactive and discussion-based.

    They sound like long hours, and they are slightly exhausting, but keep in mind you do get regular 15/20 minute breaks for every hour of work you do. They are really generous when it comes to giving you a break and not impeding on lunch hours etc. Also, just because a lecture is scheduled to end at 4:30pm doesn't mean it did. The latest I can recall finishing was around 4:10pm, and on some days they would even let us go as early as 2:30pm if we got through it faster than anticipated.

    I'm not sure how different the timetable is now, but hopefully that gives you a basic idea of what to expect.

    Martin.
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    (Original post by LPK)
    Hey,

    I completed the MA social work course at LJMU from 2012-2014, so it might have changed quite a bit since then. However, I can't imagine the general hours per week will have changed too much, as there's still a lot to learn!

    Monday: 9:30am to 4:30pm
    Tuesday: 9:30am to 4:30pm
    Wednesday - Off
    Thursday: 9:30am to 4:30pm
    Friday: 9:30am to 12:30pm (split into groups 1 and 2, with each group only coming in for 90 minutes [9:30am-11am or 11am-12:30pm])

    Monday and Tuesday was for the 'larger' modules, which would take up the entire day. Thursday was divided into a Law module in the morning, and a poverty and social exclusion module in the afternoon. Friday was a seminar for the law module, which would be more interactive and discussion-based.

    They sound like long hours, and they are slightly exhausting, but keep in mind you do get regular 15/20 minute breaks for every hour of work you do. They are really generous when it comes to giving you a break and not impeding on lunch hours etc. Also, just because a lecture is scheduled to end at 4:30pm doesn't mean it did. The latest I can recall finishing was around 4:10pm, and on some days they would even let us go as early as 2:30pm if we got through it faster than anticipated.

    I'm not sure how different the timetable is now, but hopefully that gives you a basic idea of what to expect.

    Martin.
    Thank you so much, this was really helpful! How often were you on placement ?
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    (Original post by megxb)
    Thank you so much, this was really helpful! How often were you on placement ?
    Placement was from mid-January to mid-June, with most weeks being Monday to Friday (i.e. 5 days per week). However, you also have 5 recall days during the placement, which would typically be the last Friday of each month. On those weeks, you'll only be in Monday-Thursday.

    You don't get any half term/study week whilst on placement, so you'll be there unless it's a scheduled recall day or a bank holiday.

    Edit: Although, I should note that this was before the placement days dropped to 170. I was required to do 200 days of training (2 100 day placements), so this outline won't strictly apply to you during your first year when you only do 70 days on placement.
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    Hi,

    This is not specifically a timetable question by I was wondering if either of you had any advise regarding the interview process for the MA social work at LJMU? I have an interview next week and was feeling quite confident but as time has gone on I am becoming less and less.

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Gjc1993)
    Hi,

    This is not specifically a timetable question by I was wondering if either of you had any advise regarding the interview process for the MA social work at LJMU? I have an interview next week and was feeling quite confident but as time has gone on I am becoming less and less.

    Thanks
    Honestly, my advice would be to not overthink it with 'script' style planning.

    I frequently see that applicants get so worried by the application process that they like to know the questions in advance, and plan out every part of what they will say etc. It's not really necessary to stage manage yourself in that way, and the staff at the interview process will do everything they can to make you feel comfortable and confident on the day. They aren't there to try and trip you up and make you say the wrong thing. On the contrary, they're interested in who you are as a person.

    If I had to give advice, I would recommend that you read up on the latest issues affecting social work. These will no doubt be useful to refer to at various points. Furthermore, be sure to reflect on your previous experiences as much as you can, and relate this to why you want to be a social worker. They aren't going to expect you to know the complex social work theories and methods (that's the point of the training), but they do want you to demonstrate that you have the potential to complete that training.

    Keep your experiences at the forefront of your mind, and be reflective when discussing it during the interview. Outline how you practiced with considerations for oppression and discrimination; outline the barriers you faced and how you overcame them; and even own your mistakes and state what improvements you hope to make as a student. Some might squirm at the idea of pointing out weaknesses, but they're more than likely going to ask you about it, and you are going to want to show you're self-aware that you know your own boundaries and limits. The most dangerous social worker is one who doesn't know where their knowledge and practice deficiencies lie. Sure, you don't just want to run off a list of weaknesses, but emphasise them and show the potential the course will have to let you address them. I found them to be extremely responsive to this honesty and reflective practice throughout my time on the course, and it's what they will expect you to do when completing placement reports when training.

    Best of luck with it! The staff there are fantastic people and they will do everything they can to make you feel comfortable.
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    (Original post by LPK)
    Placement was from mid-January to mid-June, with most weeks being Monday to Friday (i.e. 5 days per week). However, you also have 5 recall days during the placement, which would typically be the last Friday of each month. On those weeks, you'll only be in Monday-Thursday.

    You don't get any half term/study week whilst on placement, so you'll be there unless it's a scheduled recall day or a bank holiday.

    Edit: Although, I should note that this was before the placement days dropped to 170. I was required to do 200 days of training (2 100 day placements), so this outline won't strictly apply to you during your first year when you only do 70 days on placement.
    Hi Martin

    I'm Alice, ive seen you graduated from LJMU and was wondering about graduate prospects.

    I have been offered a place at LJMU and birmingham for september. I would rather be in Liverpool but Birmingham is the better uni. Do you think this is significant or does LJMU have good job prosepcts also? Are employers more focused on the individual and their skills? I've read its important to complete a statuatory placement, what are the chances of being offered one at LJMU?

    Thank you
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    (Original post by alicemhr)
    Hi Martin

    I'm Alice, ive seen you graduated from LJMU and was wondering about graduate prospects.

    I have been offered a place at LJMU and birmingham for september. I would rather be in Liverpool but Birmingham is the better uni. Do you think this is significant or does LJMU have good job prosepcts also? Are employers more focused on the individual and their skills? I've read its important to complete a statuatory placement, what are the chances of being offered one at LJMU?

    Thank you
    Hey,

    I am not entirely familiar with the influence that league tables have on social work recruitment, so people may have different opinions beyond my anecdotal evidence. However, I haven't witnessed any hierarchy within recruitment procedures, based on the University you graduate from. I understand that it is something which is a big issue in other careers, such as Medicine and Law, but social work doesn't really have the capability to develop a similar approach, simply because it is rather restricted in the institutions which offer it. Quite a few of the 'reputable' red-brick universities simply don't offer social work training, so employers are required to rely on individual skills and knowledge rather than adopt that hierarchical approach. It is also tightly monitored and regulated by the HCPC, so every course is relatively uniformed when meeting the necessary professional requirements and standards. That may be subject to challenge by others, but that's my own personal experience.

    The employment prospects from LJMU are fantastic too, from what I have experienced. I was fortunate to be friends with quite a large group of people during my time on the course, and all of them are in professional practice today within a statutory setting (bar one who is on maternity leave).

    As for statutory placements, there was certainly no shortage of them when I was there. LJMU is perfectly placed within a variety of local authorities across Merseyside, Cheshire, and even beyond. Therefore, the pool of providers it can utilise to arrange statutory placements is really good. I don't know how this compares to Birmingham, so may be worth checking with them, but there's definitely no shortage of them at LJMU. I was fortunate enough to train on the Wirral, so they even go out of their way to ensure that your placement is as near to your term-time address as possible to make things easier for you. They're also very accommodating over health and illness, disabilities, family commitments etc.
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    (Original post by LPK)
    Hey,

    I am not entirely familiar with the influence that league tables have on social work recruitment, so people may have different opinions beyond my anecdotal evidence. However, I haven't witnessed any hierarchy within recruitment procedures, based on the University you graduate from. I understand that it is something which is a big issue in other careers, such as Medicine and Law, but social work doesn't really have the capability to develop a similar approach, simply because it is rather restricted in the institutions which offer it. Quite a few of the 'reputable' red-brick universities simply don't offer social work training, so employers are required to rely on individual skills and knowledge rather than adopt that hierarchical approach. It is also tightly monitored and regulated by the HCPC, so every course is relatively uniformed when meeting the necessary professional requirements and standards. That may be subject to challenge by others, but that's my own personal experience.

    The employment prospects from LJMU are fantastic too, from what I have experienced. I was fortunate to be friends with quite a large group of people during my time on the course, and all of them are in professional practice today within a statutory setting (bar one who is on maternity leave).

    As for statutory placements, there was certainly no shortage of them when I was there. LJMU is perfectly placed within a variety of local authorities across Merseyside, Cheshire, and even beyond. Therefore, the pool of providers it can utilise to arrange statutory placements is really good. I don't know how this compares to Birmingham, so may be worth checking with them, but there's definitely no shortage of them at LJMU. I was fortunate enough to train on the Wirral, so they even go out of their way to ensure that your placement is as near to your term-time address as possible to make things easier for you. They're also very accommodating over health and illness, disabilities, family commitments etc.
    Thank you very much, thats really helpful and sounds promising. However, it does put me back at square one in my decision making!!

    Alice
 
 
 
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