Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

Want to get a well paid job? Become a maths teacher... watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thefish_uk)
    I wouldn't touch teaching myself unless they started a scheme where you could do some after/during university just for a short time to pay off your debts... I think they do that in America?
    I wouldn't mind doing a couple years maths/physics teaching after uni graduation if it was a recognised 'community service' type scheme which you could put as a strong point on your CV.

    I think the problem with GCSE maths as it stands is that it's quite dull, frankly. In some ways this is unavoidable, because doing the interesting stuff like calc before you can factorise is like trying to run before you can walk.
    Offline

    14
    Yes, pay them more, then my step-mum can buy me things, i'm horrified by the lack of Birthday presents i got, which was in fact zero.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by corey)
    But there are other benefits to be being a teacher in any subject! Firstly, you t least at times will be working with some more advanced stuff with 6th form classes, but also you get the pleasure of teaching someone to love whatever subject you teach.

    Theres the added benefits of any school trips you could go on, long holidays where you get paid!! and can do any research/reading at a more advanced level for your subject...and of course you always have a ready made social life with your staff!

    I myself want to be a teacher (and I should be qualified enough to teach PPE subjects, maths (GCSE) and things like business studies). I would prefer to work in a private/grammar school - but theres also benefits of working in state comprehensives, such as the pleasure you would get from seeing someone succeed through his/her and your own efforts despite the odds (if it happens to be a bad school etc.)
    My school didn't have a 6th form. =P like 2 of us in a year of 300 took higher tier maths GCSE. I think I'd have the ability to inspire people and make them understand but well, I have no great yearnings to exercise it.

    The rest are all good points, but are not things I want from a job (well not right now whilst I'm young and don't actually appreciate the benefits of stability and security).
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by edders)
    Lighthearted posts, you mean? The 'thread' is the name given to the sequence of posts within the topic I created.
    Teaching in most this country's public sector schools is anything but a cakewalk, I wouldn't consider £60,000 decent reward for it, compared to other jobs.

    "Superteachers" in failing schools can earn £120,000+ but I would rather die a slow death than enter such an occupation.

    A maths graduate with any sense will not become a teacher.

    Teaching is anything but a sinecure, although it can be rewarding in other ways. In terms of salaried work, a maths grad could earn a lot more, for less stress outside of (especially public sector) teaching.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    Teaching in most this country's public sector schools is anything but a cakewalk, I wouldn't consider £60,000 decent reward for it, compared to other jobs.

    "Superteachers" in failing schools can earn £120,000+ but I would rather die a slow death than enter such an occupation.

    A maths graduate with any sense will not become a teacher.

    Teaching is anything but a sinecure, although it can be rewarding in other ways. In terms of salaried work, a maths grad could earn a lot more, for less stress outside of (especially public sector) teaching.
    Well, if I was only interested in money I would be heading for a career as a lawyer or banker, instead of as a scientist. However, I and others also want to do something to benefit the society from which we have taken so much, so we go for jobs of a middling rather than a high income. I suspect many teachers feel they are doing a community service by being teachers, which indeed they are.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    money does make it more appealing. but i wouldnt want to teach maths because of the thought of having to teach the same thigns year after year. also teaching to a group of year 10 foundation/bottom set group most of whom who dont really care about education makes it slightly less fun.
    money would be the main factor, which is why i'd make a bad teacher.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by edders)
    Well, if I was only interested in money I would be heading for a career as a lawyer or banker, instead of as a scientist. However, I and others also want to do something to benefit the society from which we have taken so much, so we go for jobs of a middling rather than a high income. I suspect many teachers feel they are doing a community service by being teachers, which indeed they are.
    Maybe so, but remember the following:
    - There will be little time for 'creativity' and 'new directions'. At AS and A-level: You will be teaching to a syllabus which will be more proscribed than the syllabuses of today.
    - Teach any lower than AS-level and A-level, and you will simply be treading water for the rest of your professional career - I could probably teach GCSE and I despise all things mathematical.
    - Teach in an inner city school, and you run the risk of a breakdown.
    - Prepare to enjoy mountains of redtape and paperpushing, rather than teaching.
    - Prepare for a promised expansion of performance related pay and tighter scrutiny.
    - Prepare for the abolition of the 6-week summer holiday.
    - Prepare for one of the biggest shake-ups of secondary schooling since the introduction of comprehensive schools.
    - Prepare for growing militancy in the sector and an increasingly pissed-off and unaccommodating government stance.
    - Prepare to be cheeked right-left-and-centre by uppity pupils and their parents, who display a patent lack of respect for you, your profession and your authority.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by edders)
    Well that's what teaching training is for.
    yeh i know, but it still strikes me as a thing i wouldn't want to teach- i'd much rather teach psychology cos i find it easier to get enthusiastic about- i love maths but not enough to inspire others

    lou xxx
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lou p lou)
    yeh i know, but it still strikes me as a thing i wouldn't want to teach- i'd much rather teach psychology cos i find it easier to get enthusiastic about- i love maths but not enough to inspire others

    lou xxx
    i no what you mean. i think being able to teach maths is amazing...firstly you have to understand it, and then you have to make others understand it. it must be really hard. i guess it's for those naturals who didnt fail in their edexcel maths higher gcse like im gona!!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lou p lou)
    yeh i know, but it still strikes me as a thing i wouldn't want to teach- i'd much rather teach psychology cos i find it easier to get enthusiastic about- i love maths but not enough to inspire others

    lou xxx
    Heh, I am in the opposite boat kind of, I would love to teach English - discussing books and inspiring others over literature would be great - but I don't want to do a degree in English!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Ive heard that teachers have the worst life expectancy after they retire mostly because of the stress :eek:
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    Maybe so, but remember the following:
    - There will be little time for 'creativity' and 'new directions'. At AS and A-level: You will be teaching to a syllabus which will be more proscribed than the syllabuses of today.
    You have a point, but hopefully the new high school diploma which is to be introduced in a few years will give more freedom to teachers.

    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    - Teach any lower than AS-level and A-level, and you will simply be treading water for the rest of your professional career - I could probably teach GCSE and I despise all things mathematical.
    Well, just because the level of maths seems low to us doesn't mean it isn't hard to teach. There's a challenge to try and convey fundamental concepts which requires professional skills. Plus you have time out of the classroom to pursue your own interests in maths.

    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    - Teach in an inner city school, and you run the risk of a breakdown.
    They're not all that bad. Obviously, a school with well-behaved pupils is a bonus. I think if you're a good teacher your pupils will show you respect. The unruly ones can sense a weak teacher!

    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    - Prepare to enjoy mountains of redtape and paperpushing, rather than teaching.
    Some red tape is a neccessary part of the huge public education system. However, you're right a lot could be reduced; that's a political debate to be had, but it doesn't impinge on the intrinsic virtues of the career.

    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    - Prepare for a promised expansion of performance related pay and tighter scrutiny.
    Well, if you're a good teacher, I would have thought that PRP would be welcomed. Scrutiny is neccessary, although it can be over intrusive.

    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    - Prepare for the abolition of the 6-week summer holiday.
    But not an overall reduction in the amount of holiday time?

    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    - Prepare for one of the biggest shake-ups of secondary schooling since the introduction of comprehensive schools.
    It may be for the better?

    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    - Prepare for growing militancy in the sector and an increasingly pissed-off and unaccommodating government stance.
    I don't see that as a trend.

    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    - Prepare to be cheeked right-left-and-centre by uppity pupils and their parents, who display a patent lack of respect for you, your profession and your authority.
    You're right there are a few bad apples, but that's a problem with society at large that most careers face, unfortunately.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ovalorbit)
    Teaching = Backup plan. If all else fails TEACH. - That should be the motto!
    lol - its funny because its true.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Do you need to have a degree in maths to teach alevel maths?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by eddiedaboss)
    Do you need to have a degree in maths to teach alevel maths?
    nope (although both my teachers do)

    lou xxx
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lou p lou)
    nope (although both my teachers do)

    lou xxx

    So lets say I get a degree in Economics and then decide to pursue a maths teaching career (inc. alevel maths material).

    When would I learn all the maths content and over how many years would this take?

    ps. taking into account I had done alevel maths myself
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    As a son of two maths teachers and am going on to take a degree in maths, I wouldn't touch it with a bargepole (or any teaching in general). Both my parents are decent teachers (one of mum's pupils rang in to Newsround to say how good she was ) but they find it increasingly difficult to teach maths. My Dad goes to work at 7.45am and regularly finishes at midnight. My mum works similar hours (about 12 a day). They enjoy teaching nice kids but when there are a large group of disruptive students it becomes nigh on impossible to teach. Unfortunately, these "head-bangers" have now been forced into the mainstream education when they would benefit more from 1 to 1 tuition at specialist schools which used to be run by the LEA. These individuals then take up loads of lesson time. On top of that, whenever they try to discipline pupils, all they get in response is "You can't do that" or "My mum's going to sue/beat you up." I would rather be unemployed than work as a maths teacher in the state sector.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by meepmeep)
    As a son of two maths teachers and am going on to take a degree in maths, I wouldn't touch it with a bargepole (or any teaching in general). Both my parents are decent teachers (one of mum's pupils rang in to Newsround to say how good she was ) but they find it increasingly difficult to teach maths. My Dad goes to work at 7.45am and regularly finishes at midnight. My mum works similar hours (about 12 a day). They enjoy teaching nice kids but when there are a large group of disruptive students it becomes nigh on impossible to teach. Unfortunately, these "head-bangers" have now been forced into the mainstream education when they would benefit more from 1 to 1 tuition at specialist schools which used to be run by the LEA. These individuals then take up loads of lesson time. On top of that, whenever they try to discipline pupils, all they get in response is "You can't do that" or "My mum's going to sue/beat you up." I would rather be unemployed than work as a maths teacher in the state sector.
    agreed- i wouldn't touch teaching either- my mum has just quit after over 30 years because she said she didn't believe in it anymore and she was so restricted by curriculum etc that it was like following instructions and was so monotonous and boring with no job satisfaction (and she was a really good teacher). quite a few of her friends have also left or want to leave.

    lou xxx
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by eddiedaboss)
    Do you need to have a degree in maths to teach alevel maths?
    Yes. If you disagree, find me a counterexample...
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by edders)
    Yes. If you disagree, find me a counterexample...
    quite a few people on the A level maths threads before the exams said they weren't taught by maths graduates- i seemed to be strange in havibng 2 teachers both with degrees in the subject (but it seemed to occur more in schools with small 6th forms than colleges)

    lou xxx
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.