Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi guys, I've just written an answer to the question; Outline the Theory of Planned Behaviour as a model for the prevention of addictive behaviour which is a 4 marker, and was just wondering if anyone could give any feedback/tips to see if i'm on the right track!

    Here is my answer:

    The Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) states; behavioural attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control, influence the intentions an individual has to engage in a particular behaviour. The theory then suggests that if the person’s intentions are clear, then the individual’s behavioural outcomes are predictable. As a result of this explanation, the theory of planned behaviour works as a preventative model by discussing ways in which the original intention can be changed – in order to prevent the addictive behaviour forming in the first place. As the model states, behavioural attitudes are formed from the beliefs about possible outcomes of the behaviour. It explains, that if an individual views smoking positively, i.e. they find it fun - they are more at risk of forming an addiction through acting on that belief, than an individual who negatively perceives smoking – as that individual would have no intention of smoking to begin with. Therefore the way in which the theory suggests to prevent addictive behaviour is to remove the positive attitudes towards acting on the intention. The model also states subjective norms help to form addictive behaviours, these are developed from the perception that ‘Everyone does it,’ allowing the individual to adopt the belief that it is normal to pursue the behaviour i.e. smoking, taking drugs. One way to reduce this perception is to expose people to the fact that most people do not have an addiction, which would then undermine the original attitude that “everyone does it” and hopefully change their subjective Norm, consequently reducing the intention to carry out addictive behaviours. The theory finally explains perceived behavioural control the individual has influences the forming of an addiction. This refers to essentially how easy or hard it is for the individual to refrain from smoking, drugs etc. Therefore explains the best way to prevent addiction is then to encourage will power of those individuals with a low perception of behavioural control, in order for them to reject intentions of picking up addictive habits.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Alevel_geek)
    Hi guys, I've just written an answer to the question; Outline the Theory of Planned Behaviour as a model for the prevention of addictive behaviour which is a 4 marker, and was just wondering if anyone could give any feedback/tips to see if i'm on the right track!

    Here is my answer:

    The Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) states; behavioural attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control, influence the intentions an individual has to engage in a particular behaviour. The theory then suggests that if the person’s intentions are clear, then the individual’s behavioural outcomes are predictable. As a result of this explanation, the theory of planned behaviour works as a preventative model by discussing ways in which the original intention can be changed – in order to prevent the addictive behaviour forming in the first place. As the model states, behavioural attitudes are formed from the beliefs about possible outcomes of the behaviour. It explains, that if an individual views smoking positively, i.e. they find it fun - they are more at risk of forming an addiction through acting on that belief, than an individual who negatively perceives smoking – as that individual would have no intention of smoking to begin with. Therefore the way in which the theory suggests to prevent addictive behaviour is to remove the positive attitudes towards acting on the intention. The model also states subjective norms help to form addictive behaviours, these are developed from the perception that ‘Everyone does it,’ allowing the individual to adopt the belief that it is normal to pursue the behaviour i.e. smoking, taking drugs. One way to reduce this perception is to expose people to the fact that most people do not have an addiction, which would then undermine the original attitude that “everyone does it” and hopefully change their subjective Norm, consequently reducing the intention to carry out addictive behaviours. The theory finally explains perceived behavioural control the individual has influences the forming of an addiction. This refers to essentially how easy or hard it is for the individual to refrain from smoking, drugs etc. Therefore explains the best way to prevent addiction is then to encourage will power of those individuals with a low perception of behavioural control, in order for them to reject intentions of picking up addictive habits.
    It's a very good answer!! You could mention the theorist Ajzen. also mention that an individual with high perceived self control will try harder and longer than a person with low perceived control(PS may i use your answer for revision it is very good!!)
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by redarcher)
    It's a very good answer!! You could mention the theorist Ajzen. also mention that an individual with high perceived self control will try harder and longer than a person with low perceived control(PS may i use your answer for revision it is very good!!)
    Of course!

    I got full marks on it, although it was only 4, those 4 could be important The feedback was just - that it was very long and didn't need to be, but I write fast so I don't see the problem, I fit everything in on time haha!

    Thanks for the feedback, I will add in those little tweaks!
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: April 22, 2016

University open days

  • University of Chichester
    Multiple Departments Undergraduate
    Thu, 25 Oct '18
  • Norwich University of the Arts
    Undergraduate Open Days Undergraduate
    Fri, 26 Oct '18
  • University of Lincoln
    Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 27 Oct '18
Poll
Who do you think it's more helpful to talk about mental health with?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.