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    Since I was 14 I thought I definitely wanted to be a doctor, however at GCSE I did not get the grades (even though they are good) would mean I would be rejected by most medical schools in the current climate, and looking at the cons of the profession, I am not sure if I would be able to handle the stress.

    Recently I have been draw to nursing, specifically children nursing, not because its the "easy option" but I prefer the option of being able to bond more with patients and having more of a life outside of work.

    My parents however, believe that I should do a degree in biomedical sciences or something like that and get a "proper degree" because they believe that if i go into nursing I wont be "fulfilling my potential"or something.

    Now, I do not agree with this, nor to i think nurses are dumb, im just looking for honest opinions on what I should do

    Any ideas?
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    (Original post by brixghtside)
    Since I was 14 I thought I definitely wanted to be a doctor, however at GCSE I did not get the grades (even though they are good) would mean I would be rejected by most medical schools in the current climate, and looking at the cons of the profession, I am not sure if I would be able to handle the stress.

    Recently I have been draw to nursing, specifically children nursing, not because its the "easy option" but I prefer the option of being able to bond more with patients and having more of a life outside of work.

    My parents however, believe that I should do a degree in biomedical sciences or something like that and get a "proper degree" because they believe that if i go into nursing I wont be "fulfilling my potential"or something.

    Now, I do not agree with this, nor to i think nurses are dumb, im just looking for honest opinions on what I should do

    Any ideas?
    I've moved this thread into the Nursing and Midwifery forum. The Healthcare forum you posted in is for other Health Professions not Nursing.
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    (Original post by brixghtside)
    Since I was 14 I thought I definitely wanted to be a doctor, however at GCSE I did not get the grades (even though they are good) would mean I would be rejected by most medical schools in the current climate, and looking at the cons of the profession, I am not sure if I would be able to handle the stress.

    Recently I have been draw to nursing, specifically children nursing, not because its the "easy option" but I prefer the option of being able to bond more with patients and having more of a life outside of work.

    My parents however, believe that I should do a degree in biomedical sciences or something like that and get a "proper degree" because they believe that if i go into nursing I wont be "fulfilling my potential"or something.

    Now, I do not agree with this, nor to i think nurses are dumb, im just looking for honest opinions on what I should do

    Any ideas?
    Realistically if you know that nursing is the career that you want then you should go for it regardless of what anyone else thinks. At the end of the day, it is not your parents who would have to do that job every day.

    Depending on the job you take you won't necessarily be working fewer hours than a doctor does, and compared to being at school I know that I personally don't have the time or energy for a great social life outside of work. Nursing is still a stressful job, arguably sometimes moreso than medicine because you have bonded with these patients and you are responsible for meeting their care needs, and dealing with the emotional fallout when something goes wrong (and it will, probably several times a day :grin:). Obviously I'm not trying to put you off being a nurse, but it's definitely a big decision to make and you need to have a clear idea of what you're getting yourself into. While nursing is one of the most stressful and emotionally tasking professions, it is also one of the most rewarding.

    If you're not 100% sure that nursing is for you then the best recommendation I can give is to try and get some work experience shadowing a nurse, or even speaking to a nurse about her career. There are also lots of nursing-related volunteering opportunities which may be useful to you, but fewer that are related to children's nursing (although it isn't impossible).
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    (Original post by Charlotte49)
    Realistically if you know that nursing is the career that you want then you should go for it regardless of what anyone else thinks. At the end of the day, it is not your parents who would have to do that job every day.

    Depending on the job you take you won't necessarily be working fewer hours than a doctor does, and compared to being at school I know that I personally don't have the time or energy for a great social life outside of work. Nursing is still a stressful job, arguably sometimes moreso than medicine because you have bonded with these patients and you are responsible for meeting their care needs, and dealing with the emotional fallout when something goes wrong (and it will, probably several times a day :grin:). Obviously I'm not trying to put you off being a nurse, but it's definitely a big decision to make and you need to have a clear idea of what you're getting yourself into. While nursing is one of the most stressful and emotionally tasking professions, it is also one of the most rewarding.

    If you're not 100% sure that nursing is for you then the best recommendation I can give is to try and get some work experience shadowing a nurse, or even speaking to a nurse about her career. There are also lots of nursing-related volunteering opportunities which may be useful to you, but fewer that are related to children's nursing (although it isn't impossible).
    Or "His career". Please don't stereotype nurses to all be female - it's so outdated :facepalm:
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    (Original post by brixghtside)
    Since I was 14 I thought I definitely wanted to be a doctor, however at GCSE I did not get the grades (even though they are good) would mean I would be rejected by most medical schools in the current climate, and looking at the cons of the profession, I am not sure if I would be able to handle the stress.

    Recently I have been draw to nursing, specifically children nursing, not because its the "easy option" but I prefer the option of being able to bond more with patients and having more of a life outside of work.

    My parents however, believe that I should do a degree in biomedical sciences or something like that and get a "proper degree" because they believe that if i go into nursing I wont be "fulfilling my potential"or something.

    Now, I do not agree with this, nor to i think nurses are dumb, im just looking for honest opinions on what I should do

    Any ideas?
    I'm a qualified children's nurse - and originally I did look into medicine (As well as physio and paramedic) but I'm SO glad I chose nursing. The doctors might see the patient once or twice a day. As a nurse, I may well be in and out of a patient's room 30 times during a 12.5 hour shift. If I'm on consecutive shifts, I'm often allocated the same patients, so by the end of 3 night shifts, you get to know the child and parent really well. If this is what you are looking for, then nursing is more for you. Now I see what the doctors do, I'm glad I became a nurse as that's more what I was after in a career.

    I wouldn't say nurses have much more of a life outside of work - maybe just a little - but then it depends what job you go into once you qualify. Unfortunately, I frequently leave work late due to the demands of the job, and often I spend my days off resting and sleeping (Not saying Doctors don't, though).

    As for getting a "proper degree" - nursing is still a proper BSc, BA or BN degree and it's graded the same as all other degrees. There are plenty of opportunities in nursing, broader than being on the wards - for example, going into nurse education. There are also Masters degrees and Phds all available in loads of areas of nursing. If you wanted to stay clinical there are roles such as Clinical Nurse Specialist - many of these nurses will have a Masters degree, make decisions independent of doctors, and can prescribe certain medications.

    Bottom line though, don't listen too much to your parents. You are the one who has to live with this decision. Do what you want. Hope that helps you! Feel free to ask any more questions!
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    (Original post by brixghtside)
    Since I was 14 I thought I definitely wanted to be a doctor, however at GCSE I did not get the grades (even though they are good) would mean I would be rejected by most medical schools in the current climate, and looking at the cons of the profession, I am not sure if I would be able to handle the stress.

    Recently I have been draw to nursing, specifically children nursing, not because its the "easy option" but I prefer the option of being able to bond more with patients and having more of a life outside of work.

    My parents however, believe that I should do a degree in biomedical sciences or something like that and get a "proper degree" because they believe that if i go into nursing I wont be "fulfilling my potential"or something.

    Now, I do not agree with this, nor to i think nurses are dumb, im just looking for honest opinions on what I should do

    Any ideas?
    Your parents probably said that because they just assume its cleaning up after people, giving patients their medicines and working long hours including nights when its much more to it. There are many opportunities within nursing and opportunity to specialise in an area as well.
    I know one colleague who who worked as an adult nurse for 5 years is looking to do her tissue viability training or to be an ANP (Advanced Nursing Practitioner).
    Also if your GCSE's is bothering you retake them? but there should be uni's who would rather look at your A-levels and work experience instead.
    If i were in your position i would've tried to get into med school as you have more responsibility and able to diagnose which as nurse you can't do unless you were an ANP.
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    (Original post by chikane)
    Your parents probably said that because they just assume its cleaning up after people, giving patients their medicines and working long hours including nights when its much more to it. There are many opportunities within nursing and opportunity to specialise in an area as well.
    I know one colleague who who worked as an adult nurse for 5 years is looking to do her tissue viability training or to be an ANP (Advanced Nursing Practitioner).
    Also if your GCSE's is bothering you retake them? but there should be uni's who would rather look at your A-levels and work experience instead.
    If i were in your position i would've tried to get into med school as you have more responsibility and able to diagnose which as nurse you can't do unless you were an ANP.
    Although you're right in what you say, the OP has said they prefer to bond with patients. I'd argue nursing offers more opportunities for this than medicine. You must be cautious that the advice you are giving matches the person's individual situation or preferences.
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    (Original post by brixghtside)
    Since I was 14 I thought I definitely wanted to be a doctor, however at GCSE I did not get the grades (even though they are good) would mean I would be rejected by most medical schools in the current climate, and looking at the cons of the profession, I am not sure if I would be able to handle the stress.

    Recently I have been draw to nursing, specifically children nursing, not because its the "easy option" but I prefer the option of being able to bond more with patients and having more of a life outside of work.

    My parents however, believe that I should do a degree in biomedical sciences or something like that and get a "proper degree" because they believe that if i go into nursing I wont be "fulfilling my potential"or something.

    Now, I do not agree with this, nor to i think nurses are dumb, im just looking for honest opinions on what I should do

    Any ideas?
    Hi there,

    When I was a lot younger I knew I always wanted to work in medicine and wanted to be a doctor because I wanted to treat people and look after them. After growing up a bit and doing some research I soon realised that doctors usually only get to see a patient for 5 minutes once a day and have very little hands on patient contact. The doctors do not have lengthy chats with their patients like they do on Holby City, make them cups of tea or anything like that. After receiving treatment on the NHS and going through some tough times at school I decided to look into nursing and I have never looked back.

    If you want hands on patient care and have more involvement with people then nursing is definitely an option and there are many different specialities you can look into. Adult is the most varied, but Children's offers a lot of variety too and if you are based at a big children's hospital there will be loads of different opportunities. As well as different specialities to choose from, there are lots of different routes. You can become a specialist nurse in your chosen field, choose to go into management and then there is becoming an Advanced Clinical Practitioner or even teaching. Nursing is definitely a "proper" degree. Aside from medicine I think it is one of the most demanding and difficult degrees, and there will be a lot of blood, sweat and tears but it is one of the most rewarding careers.

    I am still able to have a life outside of work but it does vary on my shift pattern. I just don't get as much time or as many weekends as my non nursing friends do. But I can still schedule in a social life, I just sometimes have to arrange things for in the week!
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    (Original post by PaediatricStN)
    Or "His career". Please don't stereotype nurses to all be female - it's so outdated :facepalm:
    Obviously this was not intentional and hopefully OP would assume that the advice given is more important than a pronoun typo...

    Of course, for clarification, OP should feel free to take advice from both male and female, genderqueer, trans, non-gendered, intergender, multigender and so on as they see fit.

    I sincerely hope that I can be forgiven for this heinous crime and that your face will be saved from future 'face palm' injuries. As a nurse, I can not recommend this practice as a response to offence caused by typographical errors on online forums.
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    (Original post by Charlotte49)
    Obviously this was not intentional and hopefully OP would assume that the advice given is more important than a pronoun typo...

    Of course, for clarification, OP should feel free to take advice from both male and female, genderqueer, trans, non-gendered, intergender, multigender and so on as they see fit.

    I sincerely hope that I can be forgiven for this heinous crime and that your face will be saved from future 'face palm' injuries. As a nurse, I can not recommend this practice as a response to offence caused by typographical errors on online forums.
    Well played. Very well played.
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    (Original post by Charlotte49)
    Obviously this was not intentional and hopefully OP would assume that the advice given is more important than a pronoun typo...

    Of course, for clarification, OP should feel free to take advice from both male and female, genderqueer, trans, non-gendered, intergender, multigender and so on as they see fit.

    I sincerely hope that I can be forgiven for this heinous crime and that your face will be saved from future 'face palm' injuries. As a nurse, I can not recommend this practice as a response to offence caused by typographical errors on online forums.

    Actual LOL.
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    (Original post by Charlotte49)
    Realistically if you know that nursing is the career that you want then you should go for it regardless of what anyone else thinks. At the end of the day, it is not your parents who would have to do that job every day.

    Depending on the job you take you won't necessarily be working fewer hours than a doctor does, and compared to being at school I know that I personally don't have the time or energy for a great social life outside of work. Nursing is still a stressful job, arguably sometimes moreso than medicine because you have bonded with these patients and you are responsible for meeting their care needs, and dealing with the emotional fallout when something goes wrong (and it will, probably several times a day :grin:). Obviously I'm not trying to put you off being a nurse, but it's definitely a big decision to make and you need to have a clear idea of what you're getting yourself into. While nursing is one of the most stressful and emotionally tasking professions, it is also one of the most rewarding.

    If you're not 100% sure that nursing is for you then the best recommendation I can give is to try and get some work experience shadowing a nurse, or even speaking to a nurse about her career. There are also lots of nursing-related volunteering opportunities which may be useful to you, but fewer that are related to children's nursing (although it isn't impossible).
    Out of interest, how much is the take home pay for regular nurses?
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    Out of interest, how much is the take home pay for regular nurses?
    Depends where you work, pay is higher in London (I believe usually +15% of standard wage) and varies if you were to work in a care home or in the private sector.

    A newly qualified nurse working in the NHS would be a band 5 and would earn £21,692 as a minimum, going up to £28,180. If they moved up to a band 6 post, after gaining more experience this would be £26,041 to £34,876 (according to current RCN figures). Obviously this can increase if you work unsocial hours, holidays etc. although I'm sure that will be the next thing the government gets rid of... (Had to include the obligatory moan about pay somewhere )
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    Out of interest, how much is the take home pay for regular nurses?

    You have asked this question on several of my threads and others threads and has been answered on multiple occasions. The answer is not going to change!!!
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    (Original post by ButterflyRN)
    You have asked this question on several of my threads and others threads and has been answered on multiple occasions. The answer is not going to change!!!
    We can live in hope though, right? :bigsmile:
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    (Original post by ButterflyRN)
    You have asked this question on several of my threads and others threads and has been answered on multiple occasions. The answer is not going to change!!!
    Cool.
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    (Original post by Charlotte49)
    We can live in hope though, right? :bigsmile:
    I'm hoping for that 10% pay rise that the MPs are giving themselves but I don't think that will happen in this life time. LOL!
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    (Original post by ButterflyRN)
    I'm hoping for that 10% pay rise that the MPs are giving themselves but I don't think that will happen in this life time. LOL!
    Don't worry, we all got the 1% pay increase with the hidden 1.35% NI increase behind it
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    There's lots of potential for 'clever' nurses (maybe should say academically motivated rather than clever, as implies others are not clever!) to move up the pay scale and keep challenging themselves.

    There are specialist nurses who are highly skilled e.g. diabetes nurses, nurse prescribers in all sorts of roles, positions in co-ordination/logistics such as organising trauma lists or bed flows, roles as ward managers and heads of department, you can be in theatres as an essential part of the operating team, you can be part of acute care as a member of critical outreach, you can work in ITU/A&E/general acute specialties, you can become involved in academic research as a specialist nurse helping to run clinical trials... the list goes on :P

    Or you don't have to do any of that. Just saying, there's plenty of stuff to do if you want to challenge yourself as a nurse.
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    I agree with all posters and they've all said it bang on! But I will add....I really wouldn't class nursing as an easy path. I think your parents are thinking of nightingale times when nurses where no where near appreciated. I'm doing my nursing degree (it really is a proper degree lol) and I'm wracking my brains out right now! Not saying medical school is the same of course not. But nursing is definitely not easy. Good luck with whatever path you choose to take


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