runny4
Badges: 6
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
For the paper below, in question 17bii, i know that it gives you the correct answer but it is not on the mark scheme with the 5 methods that they have put, so could you just do the R=V/I where V=2.6V and I=5550A?

http://qualifications.pearson.com/co...-June-2014.pdf
- Paper

http://qualifications.pearson.com/co...-June-2014.pdf
- Mark Scheme

http://qualifications.pearson.com/co...-June-2014.pdf
- Examiner's report
0
reply
Vikingninja
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
Depends really. You need to ask a teacher because your answer would only be accepted in one of 5 of those methods they put in the mark scheme.

"Examiners should also be prepared to award zero marks if the candidate’s response is not worthy of credit according to the mark scheme."

"Mark schemes should be applied positively. Candidates must be rewarded for what they have shown they can do rather than penalised for omissions."
0
reply
uberteknik
  • Study Helper
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 5 years ago
#3
(Original post by runny4)
For the paper below, in question 17bii, i know that it gives you the correct answer but it is not on the mark scheme with the 5 methods that they have put, so could you just do the R=V/I where V=2.6V and I=5550A?

http://qualifications.pearson.com/co...-June-2014.pdf
- Paper

http://qualifications.pearson.com/co...-June-2014.pdf
- Mark Scheme

http://qualifications.pearson.com/co...-June-2014.pdf
- Examiner's report
No. The mark scheme is explicit that one of the five methods is used.

Clearly the question is aimed at a basic knowledge of the time-constant relationship between the capacitance and discharge path resistance.

Using ohms law is unacceptable.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Would you give consent for uni's to contact your parent/trusted person in a mental health crisis?

Yes - my parent/carer (119)
33.9%
Yes - a trusted person (95)
27.07%
No (93)
26.5%
I'm not sure (44)
12.54%

Watched Threads

View All