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    Hey, my friend wants to become a lawyer when she's older and is struggling on deciding what A-levels she needs. We have looked on some university websites for requirements but they don't state any in particular. Which, I know, is an answer in itself. BUT, is there any that may up her chances? or make her stand out a little more?
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    (Original post by Maisie13)
    Hey, my friend wants to become a lawyer when she's older and is struggling on deciding what A-levels she needs. We have looked on some university websites for requirements but they don't state any in particular. Which, I know, is an answer in itself. BUT, is there any that may up her chances? or make her stand out a little more?
    Some of my friends here are studying towards their Undergraduate Law degree and some are studying towards related degrees who will then convert to Law. A-Levels that Universities tend to prefer for Law are:

    History
    English Literature
    Maths
    Geography

    History or English Literature are somewhat of a must if you are to have a decent chance for a Law degree at any decent University. Maths isn't necessary, nor is it advised if you cannot do well in it. A general rule of thumb for Law is to pick either History or English Literature, then 1 more essay based subject (doesn't really matter which) and then a third 'strong' A2 of your choice.
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    Hi, I have completely the same problem as you


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    well taking law would be a start
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    Actually, don't take law as an A-level.

    Anything you like within reason, but strong academic subjects are preferred.
    Doing maths, english etc (at least one essay subject would be good); is much better than doing PE, Drama, Home ec. etc.

    For reference, I did math, physics, economics/bus and politics.
    Doing history/english is not a must, just that an essay based subject is ideal, as would something involving problem solving. Just make sure they're something one could actually do well in - pointless if you'd fail.
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    (Original post by bigwang)
    Some of my friends here are studying towards their Undergraduate Law degree and some are studying towards related degrees who will then convert to Law. A-Levels that Universities tend to prefer for Law are:

    History
    English Literature
    Maths
    Geography

    History or English Literature are somewhat of a must if you are to have a decent chance for a Law degree at any decent University. Maths isn't necessary, nor is it advised if you cannot do well in it. A general rule of thumb for Law is to pick either History or English Literature, then 1 more essay based subject (doesn't really matter which) and then a third 'strong' A2 of your choice.
    Thank you so much, I'll make sure to forward this on to her!
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    (Original post by Inazuma)
    Actually, don't take law as an A-level.

    Anything you like within reason, but strong academic subjects are preferred.
    Doing maths, english etc (at least one essay subject would be good); is much better than doing PE, Drama, Home ec. etc.

    For reference, I did math, physics, economics/bus and politics.
    Doing history/english is not a must, just that an essay based subject is ideal, as would something involving problem solving. Just make sure they're something one could actually do well in - pointless if you'd fail.
    I really don't get why people say this, like 50% do and the rest don't
    I mean I am looking to get into oxford law and I do not see why it should be bad to do law
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    (Original post by bigwang)
    Some of my friends here are studying towards their Undergraduate Law degree and some are studying towards related degrees who will then convert to Law. A-Levels that Universities tend to prefer for Law are:

    History
    English Literature
    Maths
    Geography

    History or English Literature are somewhat of a must if you are to have a decent chance for a Law degree at any decent University. Maths isn't necessary, nor is it advised if you cannot do well in it. A general rule of thumb for Law is to pick either History or English Literature, then 1 more essay based subject (doesn't really matter which) and then a third 'strong' A2 of your choice.
    I would only advise to choose traditional a-levels, irrespective of whether they are essay-based or not. I am doing Maths, Fmaths, Physics and English Lit, this did not hinder my application since I got 5 offers from top 10 unis. In fact, doing a traditional science helps you think critically and logically, which is helpful and proves that you can do more than memorising facts and waffling through essays (anyone with half a brain could do that).
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    (Original post by AperfectBalance)
    I really don't get why people say this, like 50% do and the rest don't
    I mean I am looking to get into oxford law and I do not see why it should be bad to do law

    I think when I was researching a year ago somewhere said that law is considered a soft subject for them? or that they preferred to teach law fresh to first years instead of them thinking law alevels is the basis of a law degree, I'm not too sure but check up on that.
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    Some unis do specify subjects like A level English, or humanities subjects so do have a look at all of the potential unis.

    Subjects that would be useful..

    English Literature
    History
    Modern Studies
    Politics
    Modern Language
    Latin
    Classical Studies

    I mean in most of those subjects, the material itself is not relevant, but the skills and techniques that are picked up are invaluable.

    Hope this helps !
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    (Original post by AperfectBalance)
    I really don't get why people say this, like 50% do and the rest don't
    I mean I am looking to get into oxford law and I do not see why it should be bad to do law
    It's not bad per se, but law schools prefer to teach you in their own way, and it's much easier to start with a blank canvas so to speak.
    Mine for instance teaches land law and trusts from a certain perspective, and leaves out topics that other schools use. Also, A level law might get one into bad habits with regards to certain things - again, my law school for instance likes people to answer Qs in certain ways.
    If you have other strong subjects it won't be that harmful though imo. Just a preference.
 
 
 
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