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    So, I have received three unconditional offers for psychology. I have been accepted by Abertay, Glasgow Caledonian, and Dundee. Each course varies slightly but all three are accredited by the BPS. The Abertay course is a BSc called "psychology with forensic biology". The Glasgow Caledonian course is also a BSc called "applied psychology". The Dundee course is just psychology. Now, I know that Dundee would probably be the most obvious choice, but the course I applied for is an undergraduate MA course ( apparently it's a Scottish thing). I am planning on becoming a forensic psychologist. Would an MA degree help with that or is a BSc better? I thought that the Abertay course seems like it would give me more options in case I change my mind and I don't want to go in that direction... The GCU course offers a named degree in forensic psychology, but when I looked at the league tables, it was ranked very low in psychology (gcu was 100, dundee was I think 33, and abertay was 54) compared to the other two unis. Maybe the answer is obvious. I'm not so sure. I just need some help weighing the pros and cons of each university and probably a little reassurance that the choice I make isn't going to bite me in the ass in the future. All opinions are welcome
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    If you want to specialise in a psychology career then BScs tend to be the best option as the course teaches psychology as an experimental science rather than just theory.

    But to be a forensic or any other type of psychologist a postgraduate degree is useful (I don't think and undergraduate degree is enough to do anything specialised). If the MA is BPS accredited then the choice really is up to you.
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    (Original post by Nmys)
    If you want to specialise in a psychology career then BScs tend to be the best option as the course teaches psychology as an experimental science rather than just theory.

    But to be a forensic or any other type of psychologist a postgraduate degree is useful (I don't think and undergraduate degree is enough to do anything specialised). If the MA is BPS accredited then the choice really is up to you.
    I intend to get a postgraduate degree as well. I just need to know if getting an MA degree would hinder my ability to get accepted into a postgraduate forensic psychology course. The entry requirements were pretty vague... :/
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    (Original post by aaaaaa.hhhhhh)
    I intend to get a postgraduate degree as well. I just need to know if getting an MA degree would hinder my ability to get accepted into a postgraduate forensic psychology course. The entry requirements were pretty vague... :/
    Isn't an MA a postgraduate degree? Or were you planning on going to PhD or getting another masters?
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    (Original post by Nmys)
    Isn't an MA a postgraduate degree? Or were you planning on going to PhD or getting another masters?
    In this case, it's not a postgraduate degree, but an undergraduate one. It's a Scottish thing apparently, that only around five universities offer. I'm not quite sure about the details, but it specifically says that it's an undergraduate course and it's four years full time.
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    (Original post by aaaaaa.hhhhhh)
    In this case, it's not a postgraduate degree, but an undergraduate one. It's a Scottish thing apparently, that only around five universities offer. I'm not quite sure about the details, but it specifically says that it's an undergraduate course and it's four years full time.
    Oh right. Well if you look at some entry requirements for postgraduate psychology courses, most do not tend to specify a particular bachelor's degree, so I guess as long as the course is BPS accredited you should just choose what would interest you the most.
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    (Original post by Nmys)
    Oh right. Well if you look at some entry requirements for postgraduate psychology courses, most do not tend to specify a particular bachelor's degree, so I guess as long as the course is BPS accredited you should just choose what would interest you the most.
    I think it's really between Abertay and Dundee. The forensic biology aspect of the course sounds really compelling, but they offer little information on the course on their website and the student satisfaction rates weren't especially high. Dundee, on the other hand, has a better rank in psychology and seems to have better facilities as well. The course outline was also very detailed. They are both in the same city, so that doesn't really factor into my decision.
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    (Original post by Nmys)
    If you want to specialise in a psychology career then BScs tend to be the best option as the course teaches psychology as an experimental science rather than just theory.

    But to be a forensic or any other type of psychologist a postgraduate degree is useful (I don't think and undergraduate degree is enough to do anything specialised). If the MA is BPS accredited then the choice really is up to you.
    http://bea-blogs-life.blogspot.co.uk/

    this might help a little?

    Bea x
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    (Original post by b_e_a_t_a)
    http://bea-blogs-life.blogspot.co.uk/

    this might help a little?

    Bea x
    I accepted the offer from Dundee about a week ago. After reading your post, I feel reassured. Thanks Dundee university seems like the right place for me.
 
 
 
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