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Should parents have a say in which GCSE/A-Level subjects their child studies? Watch

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    Do you think so?
    Why?
    What is your argument?
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    (Original post by AlexSharratt01)
    Do you think so?
    Why?
    What is your argument?
    I dunno, probably not. My mum really wanted me to take business studies, she was nagging me so much about it to the point where I had to sit down and tell her that I didn't want to take it and that it was my GCSE'S and I'd much rather take a subject which I would enjoy and get good grades in.

    I'm so glad I didn't take it.
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    My parents let me do whatever I want, I think they can advise but get no serious say, no
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    (Original post by cookiemonster15)
    I dunno, probably not. My mum really wanted me to take business studies, she was nagging me so much about it to the point where I had to sit down and tell her that I didn't want to take it and that it was my GCSE'S and I'd much rather take a subject which I would enjoy and get good grades in.

    I'm so glad I didn't take it.
    rofl, out of all the subjects she nags you about business studies? why, even?

    the only time I think parents should interfere is when their children are making clearly dreadful choices, e.g. general studies, applied subjects, etc.
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    (Original post by popcornjpg)
    rofl, out of all the subjects she nags you about business studies? why, even?

    the only time I think parents should interfere is when their children are making clearly dreadful choices, e.g. general studies, applied subjects, etc.
    She didn't like that I wanted to do textiles and tried to tell me that Business studies could help me in the future -_-
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    (Original post by cookiemonster15)
    She didn't like that I wanted to do textiles and tried to tell me that Business studies could help me in the future -_-
    tbh business studies is useful so she may have been right, but it's a pretty garbage course and I'd still never recommend it
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    No, they're the onesthat will have to study the subjects, not the parents
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    (Original post by popcornjpg)
    tbh business studies is useful so she may have been right, but it's a pretty garbage course and I'd still never recommend it
    eh, It didn't really interest me and the rest of my subjects required more hard work so I just wanted one of my subjects to be a bit more relaxing, besides, I really enjoyed textiles
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    (Original post by AlexSharratt01)
    Do you think so?
    Why?
    What is your argument?
    GCSEs - yes. Parents IMO have an obligation to make sure they study good options at GCSE. Of course they can study things they enjoy, but they shouldn't waste time on things that won't help them.

    A-level - depends. Parents should let their child pursue whatever, but must ensure they are taking the right options to enable them to pursue it. So if the son wants to do medicine, parents should make sure they study biology and chemistry.
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    With advice yes. Such as with making sure a child knows what their subjects can get them into and how much a certain subject counts e.g. my sister wanted to do PE optional and my parents questioned her as to how it would help her, her only two answers she could come up with in choosing it were: "she's doing it" (a friend) and "what would business studies get me?" (gg on this response). Not in choosing subjects though for the child so like parents making a child choose only sciences and maths at A level.
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    No - by the age of 14 you should have some independence about your choices, and GCSE options barely matter... So long as your choices are sensible, your parents shouldn't have a say in it

    (Original post by jamestg)
    GCSEs - yes. Parents IMO have an obligation to make sure they study good options at GCSE. Of course they can study things they enjoy, but they shouldn't waste time on things that won't help them.

    A-level - depends. Parents should let their child pursue whatever, but must ensure they are taking the right options to enable them to pursue it. So if the son wants to do medicine, parents should make sure they study biology and chemistry.
    I'm hoping a future doctor would be aware of the entry requirements, and not try to apply with a textiles btec...
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    Parents should try to talk with their child about the choices their child wants to make. But that doesn't mean the parents should tell their child what to study - just make sure that they fully think through their choice.
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    Of course it is fine for parents to make suggestions but ultimately it has to be their choice obviously lol, they're not 5
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    (Original post by Vicky628)
    No - by the age of 14 you should have some independence about your choices, and GCSE options barely matter... So long as your choices are sensible, your parents shouldn't have a say in it



    I'm hoping a future doctor would be aware of the entry requirements, and not try to apply with a textiles btec...
    In England we specialise our curriculum much earlier than other countries, which is why I think that parents should make sure their kids pick a wide range of options.

    Perhaps that wasn't a great example haha! Say someone wants to become a journalist, they pick media not because they enjoy it but because they think it will get them into the career they want. For the majority it isn't true, you can do anything you want and it's more important that you choose subjects you'll enjoy for careers/courses with no subject requirements.
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    no


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    I think parents should advise their kids but ultimately it should be the student's decision, it's them who will have to study it and their lives which will be affected. I think it's the school's responsibility to make sure people have the information they need to choose sensible options which don't shut down choices they will want in the future. Unfortunately most school careers advice is completely crap.
 
 
 
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