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    how can we reconcile the fact it is neither immoral or illegal for adults to drink alcohol, however, they are responsible for their actions under its influence
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    (Original post by Miawatson2)
    how can we reconcile the fact it is neither immoral or illegal for adults to drink alcohol, however, they are responsible for their actions under its influence
    Well, I guess I would say that it's because you are making the conscious decision to consume alcohol whilst knowing the consequences it would bring.
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    (Original post by cookiemonster15)
    Well, I guess I would say that it's because you are making the conscious decision to consume alcohol whilst knowing the consequences it would bring.
    its a 1200 word essay so i wish it was as simple as stating that, however it is not

    Thanks though
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    it's all about the free choice of consuming a certain amount - if you freely drink too much, then the consequences of you becoming dangerous in your behaviour stem from a free choice
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    (Original post by Miawatson2)
    how can we reconcile the fact it is neither immoral or illegal for adults to drink alcohol, however, they are responsible for their actions under its influence
    I don't think you can talk about morality as if it is as black and white as facts. If any culture had a concrete and unanimous understanding of what is and isn't moral then philosophy would cease to be debated so often and heatedly.

    Many people and entire people-groups choose to abstain completely from alcohol consumption indicating that they see it as immoral. I'm not saying that I think it is or isn't moral, just that you can't make blanket statements in regards to ethics.
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    (Original post by cookiemonster15)
    Well, I guess I would say that it's because you are making the conscious decision to consume alcohol whilst knowing the consequences it would bring.
    Supposing that is the case, could someone with an addiction to alcohol be expected to take the same level of responsibility given that there is a compulsion for them to drink rather than them making a conscious decision to do so?
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    (Original post by domlpool)
    Supposing that is the case, could someone with an addiction to alcohol be expected to take the same level of responsibility given that there is a compulsion for them to drink rather than them making a conscious decision to do so?
    But, saying that, when they first consumed alcohol, they must have known what might happen. ie, they can get addicted.
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    (Original post by cookiemonster15)
    But, saying that, when they first consumed alcohol, they must have known what might happen. ie, they can get addicted.
    when someone gets into a car they know there is a risk of being involved in a car accident, that doesn't stop compensation claims because they knew there was a risk at some point.
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    (Original post by domlpool)
    when someone gets into a car they know there is a risk of being involved in a car accident, that doesn't stop compensation claims because they knew there was a risk at some point.
    Yes, there is, however, you are not always the cause of the crash.

    I think that whether you are sober, or intoxicated, you should take the blame for any of your actions
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    But couldn't you say that someone that has an addiction and is compelled to do something that is going to alter there state of mind could claim diminished responsibility for there actions whilst under the influence of that addiction.
 
 
 
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