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    If say an antiparticle and particle collide their total mass is converted to photons. But reading in my text book it goes on about, say if, a proton and antiproton collide in accelerators, they can give different antiparticle and particles :s Does this mean annihilation doesn't always result in photons ?
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    No, the energy equivalence does not have to be transferred into all photons. Many subatomic particles of lower energy can be made from a high energy annihilation, depending on the type/place/composition of the particles involved. For example, the proton antiproton annihilation could potentially make muons, and W bosons.
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    (Original post by The-Spartan)
    No, the energy equivalence does not have to be transferred into all photons. Many subatomic particles of lower energy can be made from a high energy annihilation, depending on the type/place/composition of the particles involved. For example, the proton antiproton annihilation could potentially make muons, and W bosons.
    There fore what ur saying is that we always get photons but some of the k.e can be converted to mass in the creation of these new particles
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    (Original post by Asad_2015)
    There fore what ur saying is that we always get photons but some of the k.e can be converted to mass in the creation of these new particles
    Not Exactly
    Photons are not always made, just pretty much most of the time
    E=mc^2 works both ways
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    (Original post by The-Spartan)
    Not Exactly
    Photons are not always made, just pretty much most of the time
    E=mc^2 works both ways
    But if no photons are produced then is it still called annihilation.
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    (Original post by Asad_2015)
    But if no photons are produced then is it still called annihilation.
    Technically, no... annihilation will always produce photons in one way or another, be it the products decay into photons or the photons are created originally.

    But the initial annihilation does not have to always produce photons. In your example of proton antiproton, the valence quarks may annihilate with an anti quark, and then the rest of the quarks will rearrange into some mesons which decay into gamma rays etc. So while not directly producing photons from the initial annihilation, photons are created down the line.
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    (Original post by The-Spartan)
    Technically, no... annihilation will always produce photons in one way or another, be it the products decay into photons or the photons are created originally.

    But the initial annihilation does not have to always produce photons. In your example of proton antiproton, the valence quarks may annihilate with an anti quark, and then the rest of the quarks will rearrange into some mesons which decay into gamma rays etc. So while not directly producing photons from the initial annihilation, photons are created down the line.
    thanks your a true spartan
 
 
 
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