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    I am currently in year 12 studying Maths, Further Maths, Physics and German. I plan on continuing with all four subjects next year too. I've always loved maths and it makes sense that I should continue studying maths at uni.
    However, some of the topics in MEI Further Pure 1 seem totally horrific to me, like the topic "Identities and Roots of Polynomial Equations", and "Proof by Mathematical Induction"
    I've heard that there's a lot of calculus at degree-level maths and that branch of maths actually really appeals to me.
    Basically, my question is, if there are some topics within a-level that I'm not particularly keen on and don't enjoy, do I need to rethink my options??? Or is the course varied enough (especially in the first and second years) that I won't get stuck looking at identities and roots of polynomials for months on end?
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    (Original post by 10me2234)
    I am currently in year 12 studying Maths, Further Maths, Physics and German. I plan on continuing with all four subjects next year too. I've always loved maths and it makes sense that I should continue studying maths at uni.
    However, some of the topics in MEI Further Pure 1 seem totally horrific to me, like the topic "Identities and Roots of Polynomial Equations", and "Proof by Mathematical Induction"
    I've heard that there's a lot of calculus at degree-level maths and that branch of maths actually really appeals to me.
    Basically, my question is, if there are some topics within a-level that I'm not particularly keen on and don't enjoy, do I need to rethink my options??? Or is the course varied enough (especially in the first and second years) that I won't get stuck looking at identities and roots of polynomials for months on end?
    What exactly is horrific about them? Proof by induction is an essential tool in maths and I would not even classify it as a "topic". One may enjoy some branches and not the others which is normal. For instance you may not like Vectors and be bad at visualization of 3d objects etc which is fine, but you can't just not like "induction". What's wrong with it?
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    (Original post by 10me2234)
    I am currently in year 12 studying Maths, Further Maths, Physics and German. I plan on continuing with all four subjects next year too. I've always loved maths and it makes sense that I should continue studying maths at uni.
    However, some of the topics in MEI Further Pure 1 seem totally horrific to me, like the topic "Identities and Roots of Polynomial Equations", and "Proof by Mathematical Induction"
    I've heard that there's a lot of calculus at degree-level maths and that branch of maths actually really appeals to me.
    Basically, my question is, if there are some topics within a-level that I'm not particularly keen on and don't enjoy, do I need to rethink my options??? Or is the course varied enough (especially in the first and second years) that I won't get stuck looking at identities and roots of polynomials for months on end?
    You are able to take maths in university without ever touching a subject such as those, it just depends on the course you select and the available/core options. You could even do a degree in a mathematical related discipline such as engineering/physics/economics where proofs such as those don't arise.I used to be obsessed with pure mathematics as a child, number theory and euclidean geometry and then realised the school curriculum never actually taught really. So from the maths I did learn i was able to differentiate ( no pun intended, I love calculus) stuff I didn't like and found my self my progressively interested in mechanics/physics and found that even though I still love pure concepts and proofs such as by Induction or counter example I am have developed a hungering passion for applied mathematics, particularly to physics. So don't threat about the type of mathematics you are doing now, you just need to be able to understand them and get the required grade to move onto stuff you will enjoy which is a bit 'wrong' in my eyes because I feel the pre-university mathematics curriculum needs a serious overhaul.

    BSc Mathematics/MSc Applied mathematics
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    I did BSc maths and didn't realise I didn't like pure maths until I was well into my first year so no turning back! I muddled through by revising a lot but maybe consider doing an Applied Maths course if you really don't like them because it wouldn't be worth lowering your overall grade because of 1 or 2 units (as usually in straight maths courses, the pure units are compulsory). I had 1 pure unit in 1st year and 1 in 2nd year and then could stay well clear of them in 3rd year so if this sounds manageable to you then go for it! If not, don't put yourself off the subject just because of 1 or 2 units
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    (Original post by zoe.soothill)
    I did BSc maths and didn't realise I didn't like pure maths until I was well into my first year so no turning back! I muddled through by revising a lot but maybe consider doing an Applied Maths course if you really don't like them because it wouldn't be worth lowering your overall grade because of 1 or 2 units (as usually in straight maths courses, the pure units are compulsory). I had 1 pure unit in 1st year and 1 in 2nd year and then could stay well clear of them in 3rd year so if this sounds manageable to you then go for it! If not, don't put yourself off the subject just because of 1 or 2 units
    Only 2 pure compulsory modules in year 1 and 2?
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    I dont do A levels so correct me if im wrong. But. Roots of polynomial, isnt that just finding zeroes? That stuff is kind of assumed? And proof of induction, i didnt heard of it until i was in uni. But its an essential tool as mentioned before and no in contrary to what people above say, you CANT get away with not touching proof by induction. But its really a very very small part of maths so dont doubt! If you want to continue with maths you should just do it. Sure its a huge thing to do maths (thoughts like do i really want to do maths, am i good enough, etc) but almost all of everyone I know in my course start with those thoughts but ended up loving (well thats really strong) maths. Yeah the stream of maths you want to go to, thats something to consider. Thats the difficult bit. Do you like proofs, learning abstract maths? It might sound scary but its pretty cool and its like the foundation of maths, its the little things we take for granted. Or do you like applied? A lot like mechanics (from what I heard) and you do physics too so if you want to continue with those then applied is the way to go. Or stats? Pretty straightforward but I didnt know stats are more than you know just calculating means hahahahha. Or perhaps operational research? Its like decision maths in A level. Its the most "maths" division of math (as of undergraduate level) and by "maths" i mean subjects that involve numbers and actually (simple) counting.
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    (Original post by 10me2234)
    I am currently in year 12 studying Maths, Further Maths, Physics and German. I plan on continuing with all four subjects next year too. I've always loved maths and it makes sense that I should continue studying maths at uni.
    However, some of the topics in MEI Further Pure 1 seem totally horrific to me, like the topic "Identities and Roots of Polynomial Equations", and "Proof by Mathematical Induction"
    I've heard that there's a lot of calculus at degree-level maths and that branch of maths actually really appeals to me.
    Basically, my question is, if there are some topics within a-level that I'm not particularly keen on and don't enjoy, do I need to rethink my options??? Or is the course varied enough (especially in the first and second years) that I won't get stuck looking at identities and roots of polynomials for months on end?
    In the later years you'll get to pick which modules you do. Generally speaking there are three core areas of maths: Pure (analysis, number theory, abstract mathematics etc), Applied (lots of calculus, maths problems that relate to real life etc), and Statistics (data analysis, uncertainties etc). You'll most likely tend to like one or two more than the others - I don't know of any cases where someone has loved all three equally. If you're not so much into the Pure stuff then that's fine - you can avoid those sorts of modules later on. For now though you just need to sit through and learn the stuff as it's quite important anyway.
 
 
 
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