rachanne
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
Hi

I have just come back from visiting Queens Belfast University yesterday, where I have applied to study chemical engineering. However I am having second thoughts about studying it. I applied as I enjoy maths and chemistry however I am unsure about the physics side of things and the lab work. I know getting an engineering degree would be very good for work etc but I do not know if I want to be working on things like heat transfer in labs for the rest of my life. I have thought about changing my course to maths with finance when I get there, but looking online I am a bit confused at the mathematics course as it seems to be quite physics based with applied mathematics modules, but I cannot tell if these are compulsory as otherwise I would just do pure mathematics modules. Also I want to move away and I love Belfast university but the course for mathematics and finance does seem better at Liverpool uni ( i live here) and if i decided to become an actuary etc in the future the degree at liverpool gives exemption from some actuarial exams. However once again I do not know what I would do with a maths and finance degree maybe banking but it is competitive would chemical engineering give me a better overall career? I would also like to live abroad in the future. I do not know what to do, I am thinking shall i just take a gap year?
0
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
(Original post by rachanne)
Hi

I have just come back from visiting Queens Belfast University yesterday, where I have applied to study chemical engineering. However I am having second thoughts about studying it. I applied as I enjoy maths and chemistry however I am unsure about the physics side of things and the lab work. I know getting an engineering degree would be very good for work etc but I do not know if I want to be working on things like heat transfer in labs for the rest of my life. I have thought about changing my course to maths with finance when I get there, but looking online I am a bit confused at the mathematics course as it seems to be quite physics based with applied mathematics modules, but I cannot tell if these are compulsory as otherwise I would just do pure mathematics modules. Also I want to move away and I love Belfast university but the course for mathematics and finance does seem better at Liverpool uni ( i live here) and if i decided to become an actuary etc in the future the degree at liverpool gives exemption from some actuarial exams. However once again I do not know what I would do with a maths and finance degree maybe banking but it is competitive would chemical engineering give me a better overall career? I would also like to live abroad in the future. I do not know what to do, I am thinking shall i just take a gap year?
I don't think that very many chemical engineers are found working in labs. It's engineering after all, not chemistry. But a hesitation about the physics side of things is a suitable reason to consider reconsidering. It's engineering after all, and much of the mathematical side of it revolves around the application of physics.
1
reply
Jassy16
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by rachanne)
Hi

I have just come back from visiting Queens Belfast University yesterday, where I have applied to study chemical engineering. However I am having second thoughts about studying it. I applied as I enjoy maths and chemistry however I am unsure about the physics side of things and the lab work. I know getting an engineering degree would be very good for work etc but I do not know if I want to be working on things like heat transfer in labs for the rest of my life. I have thought about changing my course to maths with finance when I get there, but looking online I am a bit confused at the mathematics course as it seems to be quite physics based with applied mathematics modules, but I cannot tell if these are compulsory as otherwise I would just do pure mathematics modules. Also I want to move away and I love Belfast university but the course for mathematics and finance does seem better at Liverpool uni ( i live here) and if i decided to become an actuary etc in the future the degree at liverpool gives exemption from some actuarial exams. However once again I do not know what I would do with a maths and finance degree maybe banking but it is competitive would chemical engineering give me a better overall career? I would also like to live abroad in the future. I do not know what to do, I am thinking shall i just take a gap year?
Hi,

Im currently racking my brains about what sort of extra curricular activities for chemical engineering. If its not too much trouble could you share some things you done that you wrote about on your personal statement.
0
reply
rachanne
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#4
(Original post by Jassy16)
Hi,

Im currently racking my brains about what sort of extra curricular activities for chemical engineering. If its not too much trouble could you share some things you done that you wrote about on your personal statement.
I didn't apply for chemical engineering I applied to Queens Belfast for chemistry but after deliberation I have decided that if i go i will transfer to chemical engineering in the first year as you are able to if you meet the criteria.
0
reply
Raman9
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 years ago
#5
(Original post by rachanne)
I didn't apply for chemical engineering I applied to Queens Belfast for chemistry but after deliberation I have decided that if i go i will transfer to chemical engineering in the first year as you are able to if you meet the criteria.
I am confused, if you don't like physics, why are you considering transferring to chemical engineering? A chemistry degree might be more appropriate, and university chemistry is way more mathematical than A-level.
0
reply
username738914
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 years ago
#6
Engineering keeps both the engineering jobs open and everything else. Maths and Finance only keeps the everything else open.


EDIT: Didn't read. OP you shouldn't pursue engineering if you dislike physics, every single engineering course is heavy on physics. Chem Eng is more Maths and Physics than Chem - doubt there's a lot of chem if I'm honest.

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Doones
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#7
Report 4 years ago
#7
(Original post by Summit)
I am confused, if you don't like physics, why are you considering transferring to chemical engineering? A chemistry degree might be more appropriate, and university chemistry is way more mathematical than A-level.
(Original post by Princepieman)
Engineering keeps both the engineering jobs open and everything else. Maths and Finance only keeps the everything else open.


EDIT: Didn't read. OP you shouldn't pursue engineering if you dislike physics, every single engineering course is heavy on physics. Chem Eng is more Maths and Physics than Chem - doubt there's a lot of chem if I'm honest.

Posted from TSR Mobile
Yup.

OP, Chemical Engineering =/= "Chemistry" Engineering. It's mostly Maths and Physics, not Chemistry.


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you have the space and resources you need to succeed in home learning?

Yes I have everything I need (77)
63.64%
I don't have everything I need (44)
36.36%

Watched Threads

View All