why doesnt kcl offer economics? Watch

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BazTheMoney
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#61
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#61
(Original post by mobbdeeprob)
True. To be honest though, I would have thought that York should offer a law course - not that I have 'fallen in love with the place', infact quite opposite. For what is a popular subject, offered at several top-flight institutions - it just stuck me as bizarre that York did not offer the course. There is an expectation that every top institution should offer law, unless its specialisms clearly lie elsewhere (e.g. Imperial and Bath).

For something like dentistry (which is only offered at about 10 places, I think) then obviously it would be a lot more problematic to make assumptions about which institutions offer the course.
But denistry, similar to medicine, is one of thoise subjects that you decide that you want to study it before you choose what university you want to go to - it isn't the universities obligation to offer a subject, it the students job to find somewhere that does. For instance did York ever say they offered York? You were the one that made the assumption, it's your problem.
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mobbdeeprob
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#62
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(Original post by BazTheMoney)
But denistry, similar to medicine, is one of thoise subjects that you decide that you want to study it before you choose what university you want to go to
That can be the case for law too. Don't most people (regardless of their course) choose their course before potential universities?
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mobbdeeprob
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#63
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(Original post by BazTheMoney)
You were the one that made the assumption, it's your problem.
It would appear that York sees it as their problem, when you consider they are going to create a law faculty in the medium-term.
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BazTheMoney
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#64
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(Original post by mobbdeeprob)
That can be the case for law too. Don't most people (regardless of their course) choose their course before potential universities?
I wouldn't say so, not at all, many people are university orientated and select courses in accordance to universities they like; it's not something I'd advice, but too many people do it.
It would appear that York sees it as their problem, when you consider they are going to create a law faculty in the medium-term.
That's probable because they've seen a gap in the market and want to exploit it; there's demand for Law, York have the facilities to create a Law department, why not make some money?
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mobbdeeprob
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#65
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(Original post by BazTheMoney)
I wouldn't say so, not at all, many people are university orientated and select courses in accordance to universities they like; it's not something I'd advice, but too many people do it.
Sounds a tad cynical to me, at the moment (within my school cohort) you could go around asking people what they want to do and they will usually say Dentistry, Law, English, Engineering etc. Ask them where they want to go, and the response is often altogether more vague. Surely only a very insecure candidate would look at institutions before courses, rather than the inverse.

(Original post by BazTheMoney)
That's probable because they've seen a gap in the market [size=2]and want to exploit it; there's demand for Law, York have the facilities to create a Law department, why not make some money?
York and St Andrews were the only place which I was truly surprised did not offer Law courses. RHUL, York and St. Andrews are the only* institutions in The Times Top-20 which don't offer Law.

*Excluding places with an obvious technical bias.
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BazTheMoney
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#66
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#66
(Original post by mobbdeeprob)
Sounds a tad cynical to me, at the moment (within my school cohort) you could go around asking people what they want to do and they will usually say Dentistry, Law, English, Engineering etc. Ask them where they want to go, and the response is often altogether more vague. Surely only a very insecure candidate would look at institutions before courses, rather than the inverse.
I'm not saying it's completely university orientated, but universities certain influence many students decisions; and I've came in contact with many, many students. Maybe it's just an Oxbridge thing; or maybe it just I look as it as someone who's gone though the process and has access to student who have gone though the process. I certainly know people who would admit now, which they wouldn't do in Year 12/13, that universities influenced their decision of what subject more than they made out.
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mobbdeeprob
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#67
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#67
(Original post by BazTheMoney)
I'm not saying it's completely university orientated, but universities certain influence many students decisions; and I've came in contact with many, many students. Maybe it's just an Oxbridge thing; or maybe it just I look as it as someone who's gone though the process and has access to student who have gone though the process. I certainly know people who would admit now, which they wouldn't do in Year 12/13, that universities influenced their decision of what subject more than they made out.
I would say that the peergroup also has a degree of influence over which unis people apply to. Manchester, Leeds, Sheffield and Nottingham seem to be very talked about amongst people. This becomes more of a factor due to a lot of people having six choices to make - I have a good idea of where I want to go for about 4 places. Being almost overly honest, I'm tempted to put one or two of the above aforesaid unis down, not only because they offer decent courses, but because a lot of my friends will.
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BazTheMoney
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#68
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#68
(Original post by mobbdeeprob)
I would say that the peergroup also has a degree of influence over which unis people apply to. Manchester, Leeds, Sheffield and Nottingham seem to be very talked about amongst people. This becomes more of a factor due to a lot of people having six choices to make - I have a good idea of where I want to go for about 4 places. Being almost overly honest, I'm tempted to put one or two of the above aforesaid unis down, not only because they offer decent courses, but because a lot of my friends will.
Persoanally I'd reduce it from 6 options to 4, cut down on paper work; improve the application process, in the process allowing more universities to interview, ect. I think a lot of people apply to universities for the sake of it, you pay the same amount for 4 options as you do 6, why not use the extra 2. :rolleyes:
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mobbdeeprob
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#69
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#69
(Original post by BazTheMoney)
Persoanally I'd reduce it from 6 options to 4, cut down on paper work; improve the application process, in the process allowing more universities to interview, ect. I think a lot of people apply to universities for the sake of it, you pay the same amount for 4 options as you do 6, why not use the extra 2. :rolleyes:
Yes, I would agree. That would also make a lot of people think more carefully about Oxbridge application. A lot of really top quality medics that I know will not contemplate applying to Oxbridge - because they have only four choices and it demands the BMAT to be taken. On the other hand, somebody told me last week that they will be applying to Oxbridge for four days off school with interviews - and that they didn't think they stood a chance of getting in. They wouldn't do this if they had only four choices.
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BazTheMoney
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#70
(Original post by mobbdeeprob)
Yes, I would agree. That would also make a lot of people think more carefully about Oxbridge application. A lot of really top quality medics that I know will not contemplate applying to Oxbridge - because they have only four choices and it demands the BMAT to be taken. On the other hand, somebody told me last week that they will be applying to Oxbridge for four days off school with interviews - and that they didn't think they stood a chance of getting in. They wouldn't do this if they had only four choices.
I think it would dispel the image of the fashionable university too. For instance, speaking for my subject, Nottingham doesn't offer that great an Economics course, but puts on AAA offer on it because demand is high, manly due to the reputation the university has built amongst the prospective students. This basically mean application is no more that a lottery; which dosen;t help anyone, well, accept those who get the offers who shouldn't. If students were told they had only 4 choices, they would/should consider their option far more seriously, and probable make better choices; hopefully based on better reasons.
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mobbdeeprob
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(Original post by BazTheMoney)
I think it would dispel the image of the fashionable university too. For instance, speaking for my subject, Nottingham doesn't offer that great an Economics course, but puts on AAA offer on it because demand is high, manly due to the reputation the university has built amongst the prospective students. This basically mean application is no more that a lottery; which dosen;t help anyone, well, accept those who get the offers who shouldn't. If students were told they had only 4 choices, they would/should consider their option far more seriously, and probable make better choices; hopefully based on better reasons.
With Nottingham in particular, although it is a good uni, I can't help but think that as you say, it is 'fashionable'. A lot of the medics that I know would have significant qualms about putting down Bristol and Nottingham (as two choices) on their UCAS - I (and others) wouldn't be afraid to this. You have 6 choices - you can afford to have a gamble* on one or two v. popular courses and apply for Oxbridge as well.

*which is sadly what it amounts to with circa 25:1 applicant/places for law.
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BazTheMoney
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#72
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#72
(Original post by mobbdeeprob)
With Nottingham in particular, although it is a good uni, I can't help but think that as you say, it is 'fashionable'. A lot of the medics that I know would have significant qualms about putting down Bristol and Nottingham (as two choices) on their UCAS - I (and others) wouldn't be afraid to this. You have 6 choices - you can afford to have a gamble* on one or two v. popular courses and apply for Oxbridge as well.

*which is sadly what it amounts to with circa 25:1 applicant/places for law.
I agree, Nottingham is a good university, but I wouldn't say it's an outstanding university, it's offer are certainly inflated to compensate for it's image. Saying that, it's the student who build the image, not the university.

25:1 speaks for it's self, how the hell can they select the best candidates when there are so many, especially when grades are going to be pretty much identical. It's the same problem LSE have for Management, expect that course deserves more than it's ABB(?) standard offer.
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mobbdeeprob
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#73
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#73
(Original post by BazTheMoney)
I agree, Nottingham is a good university, but I wouldn't say it's an outstanding university, it's offer are certainly inflated to compensate for it's image. Saying that, it's the student who build the image, not the university.

25:1 speaks for it's self, how the hell can they select the best candidates when there are so many, especially when grades are going to be pretty much identical. It's the same problem LSE have for Management, expect that course deserves more than it's ABB(?) standard offer.
Well, the sheer number of applicants might suggest that a higher offer than ABB should be in place - if only to deter a few people from applying .

But with the exception of a few Social Policy and Environmental Science courses, the LSE is probably one of the most inaccessible places in the land, for virtually every course it offers. My only worry in applying to places like the LSE, is obviously rejection, but then the fact that a lot of people don't hear anything from them (in terms of an offer) until well after March. Unlike Oxbridge and UCL, the LSE seem to be one of the top institutions which is prepared to lower the bar - as far as International students are concerned. This also peeves me slightly, although I can understand why it makes corporate sense.
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BazTheMoney
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#74
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#74
(Original post by mobbdeeprob)
Well, the sheer number of applicants might suggest that a higher offer than ABB should be in place - if only to deter a few people from applying .

But with the exception of a few Social Policy and Environmental Science courses, the LSE is probably one of the most inaccessible places in the land, for virtually every course it offers. My only worry in applying to places like the LSE, is obviously rejection, but then the fact that a lot of people don't hear anything from them (in terms of an offer) until well after March. Unlike Oxbridge and UCL, the LSE seem to be one of the top institutions which is prepared to lower the bar - as far as International students are concerned. This also peeves me slightly, although I can understand why it makes corporate sense.
That's the problem, nowadays so many people are being predicted AAA it probable wouldn't matter.

It quite common to not get offers until March, I don't know why students complain, they could always put your application in the bin in November and tell you you're rejected. :rolleyes: Faced with that I think many people would rather wait till March - most people don't send their application off until December time anyway. And international students are just one of those things, at least LSE are fairly open about it.
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kingslaw
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#75
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(Original post by Just an LSE guy)
BTW kingslaw, I have lots of law books in excellent condition (never used in some cases) - many are still the same edition as in the shops.

Fancy buying any? I could sell all of them to you for one price, or on an individual basis. I can e-mail a list if you're interested.

I also have a few essays - but I'd give those for free.
That'd be really useful actually. Thankyou very much. I'd better wait till I get my results though as I may not actually have a lot of use for the books if I dont actually get in!
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magicalsausage
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#76
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The last thing Britain needs is another Law faculty.
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