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    I am currently in year 12 and will be applying next year to do a degree in history. Is there anything I need to be doing in terms of extra-curricular i.e work experience etc? Thank you to anyone who can help!!
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    (Original post by theftse1999)
    I am currently in year 12 and will be applying next year to do a degree in history. Is there anything I need to be doing in terms of extra-curricular i.e work experience etc? Thank you to anyone who can help!!
    Nothing much extra-curricular. Focus on academics such as extra reading and possibly try for super-curriculars such as university taster courses, essay competitions etc.

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    I'm planning on doing either a history or history and politics degree in 2017 and for work experience, I've got a placement with my local MP. I've also volunteered to be an electoral observer for the upcoming EU referendum
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    I went to a open day at Oxford and one of the lectures told me that if you want work experience try and volunteer in your local museum. She said that it didn't matter how established or big the museum was because it just shows you are interested.


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    Yeah, I agree with Rosa Leonora, museum work experience is a very good idea. I'm 18 now and should be going to uni in September to study history and politics, and I do regret not having as yet, any museum experience, especially as I've started thinking about it as a possible career path anyway.
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    You really don't need any work-based experience. Everybody tries to bag a museum placement, or something concerning heritage and culture, but such opportunities are both hard to come by and super competitive.

    The best thing you can do is read as much as possible. This was the advice I was given when I was applying back in 2014, and it was the best advice I received, as one of the first questions the admissions tutor who interviewed me for the university I go to now asked me was: "what have you read that has helped to nurture your interest in history?". I was able to discuss my own opinions re. the books that I had been reading, which opened up a healthy debate that allowed me to show my ability to think critically and analyse the historiography, which you can't do if you haven't read anything to talk about.

    It seems like such simple advice, but it definitely works, and the great thing is that it is so accessible - unlike history-based work experience, which is so hard to find. Admission tutors don't care if you manage to catch a placement in a fancy museum or at a National Trust site. Although work experience in a heritage site is impressive, it doesn't contribute to your degree as much as a broad historiographical knowledge, which you can rely on during your degree.

    I hope this helps you, and good luck with your university applications!

    EDIT: It is actually easier to get museum experience whilst AT university, as it makes you more attractive to the museum in question. Your university will have a careers centre that will help you find a placement in the heritage sector.
 
 
 
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