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    I am admitted to Imperial College London (Physics major, I have already met the condition.) and UCLA. Now I am hesitating between these two. While I am most interested in general engineering, or applied physics in engineering, both IC and UCLA do not have programs that exactly fit my passion. Alternatively, my intended major is physics currently, for I believe it could lead me to any engineering field in the future. I would like to go directly to graduate school in US in the future.

    Accordingly, here are some factors to be considered.

    1. The quality of lectures and Professor's teaching ability. How helpful are their instructions? Academics is always at my first priority for consideration.

    2. The accessibility of professors beyond lecture time. IC seems to have a not good reputation on that saying professors only show up on lectures and do not care about undergraduate students too much. I would like to have a frequent connection with professors considering the research opportunities, recommendation letters and other first-hand inspirations.

    3. Is there any difference considering graduate school application between these two? I wonder how is the reputation of Imperial College London in US. Or any insider could tell my where IC students who apply to US grad school go.

    4. About the major, I really want to take courses besides physics and math to better prepare for an engineering career. (While I do not apply to single engineering course is that I want to study more generally and comprehensively during undergraduate education.) I learnt from somewhere that some students indeed took double degree in math and physics in IC, but IC physics department does not tell me I could do double majors when I was asking--they only told me physics courseload is really heavy and I would not have time to branch out. Is it really impossible in terms of administrative regulation? Or could any physics student in IC tell how many time you spend per week on physics study?

    5. I heard that the British system uses different grading system so if the score is translated to GPA, it is highly difficult to get a high one.

    Any other insights are also highly appreciated. I could not make my mind until now. Currently I have learnt a lot about UCLA in its active students group but I know almost nothing about what my life will be in Imperial College. I will be grateful if any insider could convince me or offer description about life of studying physics in IC. Thanks very much!!!
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    (Original post by SukieH)
    I am admitted to Imperial College London (Physics major, I have already met the condition.) and UCLA. Now I am hesitating between these two. While I am most interested in general engineering, or applied physics in engineering, both IC and UCLA do not have programs that exactly fit my passion. Alternatively, my intended major is physics currently, for I believe it could lead me to any engineering field in the future. I would like to go directly to graduate school in US in the future.

    Accordingly, here are some factors to be considered.

    1. The quality of lectures and Professor's teaching ability. How helpful are their instructions? Academics is always at my first priority for consideration.

    2. The accessibility of professors beyond lecture time. IC seems to have a not good reputation on that saying professors only show up on lectures and do not care about undergraduate students too much. I would like to have a frequent connection with professors considering the research opportunities, recommendation letters and other first-hand inspirations.

    3. Is there any difference considering graduate school application between these two? I wonder how is the reputation of Imperial College London in US. Or any insider could tell my where IC students who apply to US grad school go.

    4. About the major, I really want to take courses besides physics and math to better prepare for an engineering career. (While I do not apply to single engineering course is that I want to study more generally and comprehensively during undergraduate education.) I learnt from somewhere that some students indeed took double degree in math and physics in IC, but IC physics department does not tell me I could do double majors when I was asking--they only told me physics courseload is really heavy and I would not have time to branch out. Is it really impossible in terms of administrative regulation? Or could any physics student in IC tell how many time you spend per week on physics study?

    5. I heard that the British system uses different grading system so if the score is translated to GPA, it is highly difficult to get a high one.

    Any other insights are also highly appreciated. I could not make my mind until now. Currently I have learnt a lot about UCLA in its active students group but I know almost nothing about what my life will be in Imperial College. I will be grateful if any insider could convince me or offer description about life of studying physics in IC. Thanks very much!!!
    imperial does a maths with applied maths and mathematical physics, it's in the school of maths.

    if you want to study a variety of modules you might be better off applying to physics courses at somewhere like Warwick where afaik you have an open module to take in any department in the later years.

    TBH if you know you want to be an engineer you're better off just applying for engineering courses, at least as far as the british system is concerned imo.
 
 
 
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