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    Hi guys,

    I'm a first year psychology student and cannot for the life of me use SPSS to do even the simplest of things.

    I just want simple step by step guides for how to do the easiest things like:
    - find the effect size (d)
    -find the mean difference between 2 conditions
    - screen the data for outliers etc.

    can anyone help me?

    Thank youuu
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    (Original post by failingschool)
    Hi guys,

    I'm a first year psychology student and cannot for the life of me use SPSS to do even the simplest of things.

    I just want simple step by step guides for how to do the easiest things like:
    - find the effect size (d)
    -find the mean difference between 2 conditions
    - screen the data for outliers etc.

    can anyone help me?

    Thank youuu
    SPSS just requires practise, no one is naturally good at it. Andy Field's book has pretty solid instructions, and has youtube (it sounds like the t-test section would be useful). As far as i am aware you can't calculate cohen's D effect size on SPSS- you need to do this using the output from SPSS (for two groups and a continuous variable you need the SD and mean for each group) and the formula for cohen's d (you could put it into here http://www.socscistatistics.com/effe.../Default3.aspx ).

    As far as outliers go, you need to be a little more specific. You can have univariate outliers (e.g. take 100 class member's height, if one of them is recorded as 2000m you can be sure that its a outlier) or multivariate outliers (i.e. if you plot hand length and height, someone with quite large hands but is the smallest in the class could be a mutlivariate outlier).
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    (Original post by iammichealjackson)
    SPSS just requires practise, no one is naturally good at it. Andy Field's book has pretty solid instructions, and has youtube (it sounds like the t-test section would be useful). As far as i am aware you can't calculate cohen's D effect size on SPSS- you need to do this using the output from SPSS (for two groups and a continuous variable you need the SD and mean for each group) and the formula for cohen's d (you could put it into here http://www.socscistatistics.com/effe.../Default3.aspx ).

    As far as outliers go, you need to be a little more specific. You can have univariate outliers (e.g. take 100 class member's height, if one of them is recorded as 2000m you can be sure that its a outlier) or multivariate outliers (i.e. if you plot hand length and height, someone with quite large hands but is the smallest in the class could be a mutlivariate outlier).
    Just come across this thread, looking for someone who knows how to use SPSS. Could you answer my question please? http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...rimary_content
    I'm having the same problem really especially understanding how to interpret some of the numbers, since I've no experience in stats and haven't done maths since GCSE. And are you using a PDF version of Andy Field's book?
 
 
 
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