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    I'm currently in year 12 and I am taking biology, chemistry, maths and further maths. When I was choosing my A levels taking biology instead of physics was a last minute decision. Before that moment I was pretty sure in taking physics. I don't regret taking biology, but I really want to do physics. It's too late for me to change but I will be taking AS level physics next year at least, planning to take the whole A level next year but I have to contact the exam board to see if it's possible with the new spec.

    I was just wondering if there were any universities that don't require A level physics for the degree? Keele allow it, if you have AS physics and an A in maths and I think Coventry but can anyone tell me any others. I'd also prefer not to apply to a foundation course.
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    Cambridge Physics only requires A-level Maths and Further Maths if you have 3 units of mechanics.
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    If you are super keen on doing physics then I would drop a subject besides maths. As heinous as if seems, most physics courses don't require a full A-level in fm. I think only some of them ones do. Most just expect a good A-level in maths.

    If you are able to take the whole A-level next year then I would strongly consider studying the AS over the summer, it'll tie in nicely to any mechanics modules you may do next year too.

    If you can't do the full A-level physics, do the AS and make sure you have a few mechanics modules and explain your situation to them. Maybe do it externally.
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    If your grades are good enough to study at a good Russell group university, I wouldn't bother with it. Cambridge does not require A level physics, which is actually the sensible position. Nonetheless, most other universities do. However much you like physics you'd probably have a better time, and better prospects, studying maths at Manchester than Physics at Keele or Coventry. My two cents. If you go for the full A level regardless you should study AS physics over the summer so you're better prepared for interviews, but having lots of exams in physics will be painful.
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    Was looking today and as far as I can tell Portsmouth uni BScBSc courses allow entry with just Maths or Physics C grade (260-280 overall)
    Either Applied physics or Physics, Astronomy and Cosmology.

    Can't comment on suitability as just doing some initial research


    (Original post by autumnblue)
    I'm currently in year 12 and I am taking biology, chemistry, maths and further maths. When I was choosing my A levels taking biology instead of physics was a last minute decision. Before that moment I was pretty sure in taking physics. I don't regret taking biology, but I really want to do physics. It's too late for me to change but I will be taking AS level physics next year at least, planning to take the whole A level next year but I have to contact the exam board to see if it's possible with the new spec.

    I was just wondering if there were any universities that don't require A level physics for the degree? Keele allow it, if you have AS physics and an A in maths and I think Coventry but can anyone tell me any others. I'd also prefer not to apply to a foundation course.
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    (Original post by autumnblue)
    I'm currently in year 12 and I am taking biology, chemistry, maths and further maths. When I was choosing my A levels taking biology instead of physics was a last minute decision. Before that moment I was pretty sure in taking physics. I don't regret taking biology, but I really want to do physics. It's too late for me to change but I will be taking AS level physics next year at least, planning to take the whole A level next year but I have to contact the exam board to see if it's possible with the new spec.

    I was just wondering if there were any universities that don't require A level physics for the degree? Keele allow it, if you have AS physics and an A in maths and I think Coventry but can anyone tell me any others. I'd also prefer not to apply to a foundation course.
    If you cant do the whole A-level in a year and do well in maths and further maths (AB or higher) then take a gap year as almost every uni wants physics (if you get AB in M+FM then you can get into much better places than keele, not that theres anything wrong with it but the further you go up the league table, the more advanced content you get to cover in later+earlier years)

    Its a shame A-level physics is an entry requirement as its really not that helpful to a physics degree
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    (Original post by autumnblue)
    I'm currently in year 12 and I am taking biology, chemistry, maths and further maths. When I was choosing my A levels taking biology instead of physics was a last minute decision. Before that moment I was pretty sure in taking physics. I don't regret taking biology, but I really want to do physics. It's too late for me to change but I will be taking AS level physics next year at least, planning to take the whole A level next year but I have to contact the exam board to see if it's possible with the new spec.

    I was just wondering if there were any universities that don't require A level physics for the degree? Keele allow it, if you have AS physics and an A in maths and I think Coventry but can anyone tell me any others. I'd also prefer not to apply to a foundation course.
    Avoid it! Its not the old physics you were sold when you chose your a levels, its the new course. Avoid it like the bubonic plague, its about 10 times harder than the old course
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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    If you cant do the whole A-level in a year and do well in maths and further maths (AB or higher) then take a gap year as almost every uni wants physics (if you get AB in M+FM then you can get into much better places than keele, not that theres anything wrong with it but the further you go up the league table, the more advanced content you get to cover in later+earlier years)

    Its a shame A-level physics is an entry requirement as its really not that helpful to a physics degree
    I think I'm just going to self teach myself, at least I'll be familiar with mechanics.
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    (Original post by Colinj451)
    Was looking today and as far as I can tell Portsmouth uni BScBSc courses allow entry with just Maths or Physics C grade (260-280 overall)
    Either Applied physics or Physics, Astronomy and Cosmology.

    Can't comment on suitability as just doing some initial research
    Thanks I'll check their courses out.

    **Just check and you need A level Physics.
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    (Original post by autumnblue)
    I think I'm just going to self teach myself, at least I'll be familiar with mechanics.
    Woo! Its mainly just memorizing concepts+facts and applying them to problems, theres not actually much content in comparison to say biology and theres no real maths in it either.

    Also when applying to physics at uni, an A in maths and/or FM is so so so so so so much better for admissions than an A in physics so focus on getting them as high as you can (even if it means getting a B in physics instead of an A etc)
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    (Original post by autumnblue)
    Thanks I'll check their courses out.

    **Just check and you need A level Physics.
    Entry
    260 points to include 2 A levels or equivalent, with 80 points from A level Mathematics, Physics, or Electronics.

    http://www.port.ac.uk/courses/mathem...and-cosmology/

    This is BSc, not MPhys, but you can trade up after first year if you get high enough results
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    (Original post by Colinj451)
    Entry
    260 points to include 2 A levels or equivalent, with 80 points from A level Mathematics, Physics, or Electronics.

    http://www.port.ac.uk/courses/mathem...and-cosmology/

    This is BSc, not MPhys, but you can trade up after first year if you get high enough results
    I would be VERY concerned about the level of content covered in a physics course that didnt require an A-level in mathematics as pre-requisite as it is fundamentally required knowledge for physics degree (and also it doesnt have accreditation, which isnt important in itself but with the combination of not requiring a maths A-level it may mean the course itsnt up to the general standard of most physics courses)
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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    I would be VERY concerned about the level of content covered in a physics course that didnt require an A-level in mathematics as pre-requisite as it is fundamentally required knowledge for physics degree (and also it doesnt have accreditation, which isnt important in itself but with the combination of not requiring a maths A-level it may mean the course itsnt up to the general standard of most physics courses)
    All I can say without any detailed knowledge is that it is IOP accredited and my limited dealings with enquiries have been answered quickly and efficiently.
    So I can't comment of the course, except it fulfills the request of the OP, in that it is a physics degree that requires maths without prescribing A2 physics. There are probably less options overall at a university such as Portsmouth as the research base and funding will be smaller.
    If it suits someone though then that is not necessarily a problem. For instance, Lincoln had a physics intake of 20 for 2016 I believe and are highly weighted towards computational and mathematical physics as it is a small unit, and that is the research that the staff are involved in.
    To that end I think it is worth looking at, but given the info and after further investigation obviously it may in the end not be suitable for any number of reasons (the same as any university course)
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    (Original post by Colinj451)
    All I can say without any detailed knowledge is that it is IOP accredited and my limited dealings with enquiries have been answered quickly and efficiently.
    So I can't comment of the course, except it fulfills the request of the OP, in that it is a physics degree that requires maths without prescribing A2 physics. There are probably less options overall at a university such as Portsmouth as the research base and funding will be smaller.
    If it suits someone though then that is not necessarily a problem. For instance, Lincoln had a physics intake of 20 for 2016 I believe and are highly weighted towards computational and mathematical physics as it is a small unit, and that is the research that the staff are involved in.
    To that end I think it is worth looking at, but given the info and after further investigation obviously it may in the end not be suitable for any number of reasons (the same as any university course)
    According to the IOP document that lists all current accredited courses, the physics courses at Portsmouth arent accredited as they do not appear in this document (see link to page with document)

    http://www.iop.org/education/higher_...age_43310.html

    It isnt the options etc I am concerned about, it is the fact that the course does not require students to have been exposed to calculus prior to first year (where as every other physics course in the UK does) as calculus is FUNDAMENTAL to physics. All of the core physics learnt requires the knowledge of calculus and beyond. While you are right that it is an option for the OP it is something I would approach with EXTREME caution due to the above reason

    The example of Lincoln you gave isnt really relevant to not needing a maths A-level it is just giving an example of later year research opportunities (which most students wont see until their project anyway), I am talking about core physics that EVERY physics student must learn. (things like classical mechanics etc)
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    I apologise regarding the accreditation
    I am aware of the IOP document, in fact if you look at it then Leeds courses ran out in November last year so I don't set much stall by it, given that it is stated that it was published in Jan 2016 but they still appear (Bath, ICL, Keele, Kent, Manchester, Nottingham,Salford, Southampton & Nottingham Trent and Scottish universities going back to 2014, I would have thought that the IOP fact checking and proof reading would have been slightly better)

    The course is on the recognised list and last year stated that they were awaiting accreditation

    Either way it is for the OP to look at the exact make up of the course. If a suitable physics degree won't take him without A2 physics then there are a number of integrated foundation courses that are available, in fact probably more than usual open to him if he takes physics but does poorly in the exam.
 
 
 
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