Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

Why don't we have 'assistant doctors' who can prescribe low-level medication? watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    All industries (accounting, law, engineering and so on) have them: the person who is a step below the "qualified" professional and can engage in low-level, basic professional tasks.

    In light of the strain on the NHS, especially GP surgeries, why don't we introduce 'assistant doctors'. These would be people who had to undergo some training, but less than that of a doctor and a nurse (not requiring a degree) and it would be largely vocational in nature. They would then be authorised to deal with/prescribe for minor ailments at the GP surgery and hospital.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by Grand High Witch)
    All industries (accounting, law, engineering and so on) have them: the person who is a step below the "qualified" professional and can engage in low-level, basic professional tasks.

    In light of the strain on the NHS, especially GP surgeries, why don't we introduce 'assistant doctors'. These would be people who had to undergo some training, but less than that of a doctor and a nurse (not requiring a degree) and it would be largely vocational in nature. They would then be authorised to deal with/prescribe for minor ailments at the GP surgery and hospital.
    Like a pharmacist... or a nurse.

    http://www.nhs.uk/chq/Pages/1629.aspx?CategoryID=68
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Grand High Witch)
    All industries (accounting, law, engineering and so on) have them: the person who is a step below the "qualified" professional and can engage in low-level, basic professional tasks.

    In light of the strain on the NHS, especially GP surgeries, why don't we introduce 'assistant doctors'. These would be people who had to undergo some training, but less than that of a doctor and a nurse (not requiring a degree) and it would be largely vocational in nature. They would then be authorised to deal with/prescribe for minor ailments at the GP surgery and hospital.
    Yes let's put people with little to no qualifications in charge of giving out drugs. Why on earth would that be a bad idea.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jneill)
    Like a pharmacist... or a nurse.

    http://www.nhs.uk/chq/Pages/1629.aspx?CategoryID=68
    We need someone in between a pharmacist and a nurse in terms of prescribing power to deal with the demand in GP surgeries and hospitals.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Think they're called nurses, nurse practitioners, paramedics...
    • Section Leader
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Very Important Poster
    Peer Support Volunteers
    When you say minor ailments what do you mean? You can see a pharmacist for basic advice and I ve regularly spoken to one before deciding if making a GP appointment is necessary or not.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by claireestelle)
    When you say minor ailments what do you mean? You can see a pharmacist for basic advice and I ve regularly spoken to one before deciding if making a GP appointment is necessary or not.
    Where what you want cannot be prescribed by a pharmacist and is too minor to be required to be prescribed by a GP or nurse.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by Grand High Witch)
    We need someone in between a pharmacist and a nurse in terms of prescribing power to deal with the demand in GP surgeries and hospitals.
    Nurses *can* prescribe. Read the link.
    • Section Leader
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Very Important Poster
    Peer Support Volunteers
    (Original post by Grand High Witch)
    Where what you want cannot be prescribed by a pharmacist and is too minor to be required to be prescribed by a GP or nurse.
    There aren't any conditions I can think of that come under that?
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by Grand High Witch)
    Where what you want cannot be prescribed by a pharmacist and is too minor to be required to be prescribed by a GP or nurse.
    For example?
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    There is a new P.A role now i think , similar to a doctor but needs to work under consultant directly.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Nurses can and I think a pharmacist has some discretion
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jneill)
    For example?
    No idea, but it's obvious that GP surgeries are under too much demand, especially with minor ailments. If nurses are not meeting the demand then what's wrong with starting a new profession which takes a bit less time to qualify compared to a nurse/GP and will attract a lot of applicants and might relieve demand?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Grand High Witch)
    No idea, but it's obvious that GP surgeries are under too much demand, especially with minor ailments. If nurses are not meeting the demand then what's wrong with starting a new profession which takes a bit less time to qualify compared to a nurse/GP and will attract a lot of applicants and might relieve demand?
    https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...cian-associate
    • Very Important Poster
    Online

    19
    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by Grand High Witch)
    No idea, but it's obvious that GP surgeries are under too much demand, especially with minor ailments. If nurses are not meeting the demand then what's wrong with starting a new profession which takes a bit less time to qualify compared to a nurse/GP and will attract a lot of applicants and might relieve demand?
    Why would you need a new profession, why not just have more nurses? The limit is money.
    What was the legal equivalent you were thinking of? You have trainees, but they arent allowed to do anything on their own initiative, except under heavy supervision.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by Grand High Witch)
    No idea, but it's obvious that GP surgeries are under too much demand, especially with minor ailments. If nurses are not meeting the demand then what's wrong with starting a new profession which takes a bit less time to qualify compared to a nurse/GP and will attract a lot of applicants and might relieve demand?
    As I said, nurses (and pharmacists) already can perform that role. I understand it's 4 years training for a nurse, plus a short supplementary course for the prescribing role.

    I'd rather not be prescribed by anyone with less training than that.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Fam, why be just an "assistant doctor" after going through all that pain and crap loads of student debt? :erm:

    You have to be properly trained, otherwise you're putting people's lives at risk. And I'm pretty sure its 4 years training for a nurse, and 5/6 years for a junior doc....soo anything less than 4 is a wee bit risky?

    Doctors have to train/ learn in order to specialize further too...
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Interesting Can they prescribe?

    And they are post grads with a further 2 years of training. Sounds sensible.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jneill)
    Interesting Can they prescribe?

    And they are post grads with a further 2 years of training. Sounds sensible.
    I don't think they can yet, but it's something I imagine they'll be able to do in the future.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Grand High Witch)
    We need someone in between a pharmacist and a nurse in terms of prescribing power to deal with the demand in GP surgeries and hospitals.
    I would suggest you do a little bit of research about about Nurse andPharmacist independent prescribing ...

    then you'll realise how little sense your comment makes
 
 
 
Poll
Do I go to The Streets tomorrow night?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.